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foods for baby brain development

Has the time come to transition your baby into the world of solids? (Raise your hand if you're feeling excited. ) Each baby's first experience with solids is different—some babies take to their first foods right away, while others require some trial and error. Allow your baby to sample a variety of healthy and nutritious foods, and let patience—and nutrition—be your guide.

Remember to always check in with your child's pediatrician before starting solids, in case there are any specific considerations for your little one. Once you get the go-ahead, focus on foods that are rich in nutrients that support your baby's healthy growth.

Here are foods that could positively impact your baby's brain development:


1. Greek yogurt

Yogurt is a popular first food all around the world. It is a nutritious option because it contains calcium, protein and healthy fat.

Incorporating healthy fat options like yogurt into your baby's diet will help develop their brain cells as well as offer probiotics which help to build a strong microbiome. Recent studies have demonstrated a connection between our gut and brain. Plus, babies tend to like the rich, creamy texture of Greek yogurt.

2. Avocado

Creamy, mashed avocado is a popular first food. Avocado is a nutrient-dense fruit with healthy fat, vitamins and minerals. Not only is it nutritious, as the healthy fats contribute to brain cell development, but the texture is soft and easy for baby to tolerate.

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3. Cheese

Small soft cheeses are often introduced early, depending on your baby's readiness, because they're lighter in taste and texture. Cottage cheese is an easy offering: your baby can eat it as a finger food or it can be mixed with a vegetable or fruit.

4. Whole grain porridge

Offering your baby a whole grain cereal blend is a nutritious option. Whole grains such as oatmeal, quinoa and barley should be pulverized and blended into a fine powder form and boiled with water. Once cooked, mix it with breast milk, yogurt or a fruit/vegetable blend. Whole grains offer fiber and a source of protein.

5. Eggs

Egg whites should not be introduced until 12 months due to its higher risk as an allergen, but egg yolks are surprisingly nutritious and easy to digest.

Egg yolks contain cholesterol, which is what comprises the outer lining of brain cells. In addition, they contain fat-soluble vitamins as well as choline, selenium and Vitamin B12—all important for organ development.

6. Nut butters

Traditional nuts in their butter form are a good source of healthy fat, protein and fat-soluble vitamins. Peanut, cashew and almond butter are all options to offer your baby when you feel they're ready.

You could offer it as a small spoonful mixed into your baby's cereal or porridge blend, yogurt or even applesauce. As more public environments become “nut aware," there is increased popularity among sunflower seed butter, a.k.a. sun butter. Sunflower Butter is free from the top eight food allergens: peanuts, tree nuts, soy, dairy, eggs, wheat, fish and crustacean shellfish.

Note: According to a recent recommendation from the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, highly allergenic foods like nuts can be introduced into infants' diets as early as six months.

7. Apples

These nutritious fruits contain quercetin, which helps stimulate brain activity. Apples are easy to offer as a first food and throughout your baby's transitional food stages. (Check out this great applesauce recipe!) As they become more comfortable with finger foods and as they develop teeth, you could offer apples with nut butter as a healthy pairing.

8. Lentils

Lentils are available in various forms and are an extremely popular offering on the east side of the world. They are especially nutritious because they contain fiber, iron and protein. They're soft and easy to cook (no soaking required) and can easily be blended into puree or soup form. They're also one of the lighter legume and bean options to initially offer.

9. Leafy Greens

While these may be hard to offer initially as a single vegetable, they could be used as a blend so they're tolerated better. For example, you could blend spinach with apple or carrots. Because many leafy greens contain nitrates, it is often recommended as a later introduction at perhaps closer to 10 months onwards.

Leafy greens such as spinach or kale offer the lutein and Vitamin K which contribute to positive brain activity.

10. Salmon

Babies' growing brains require DHA, an omega-3 fatty acid that is essential to cognitive development. Salmon is an excellent dietary source of DHA. You could mash some cooked, mix into a puree or even create a salmon burger or nuggets if finger foods are accepted.


10 foods to boost baby's brain development

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