When it comes to period care, I'm a total period cup convert. I made the switch several years ago and after instantly finding them more convenient, cheaper, and better for my body, I've never looked back. But admittedly, I've never given much thought to how they work. Like my car, I sort of trust that whatever is under the hood just works. Magic!

But I'm a grown up lady, and knowledge is power, so when I stumbled upon the incredible period cup resource that is @periodnirvana's tiktok account, I went deep into the rabbit hole. (Ok, that's an unfortunate phrase given the subject but if anyone has an alternative please LMK.) All of their content is super informative and if you're considering making the switch, I can't recommend it highly enough. But the absolute first place to start is with their bonkers-viral Tiktok of how period cups work. (Who would have thought tiktok period cup content would be my go-to entertainment?)

@periodnirvana

Find the right cup or disc with help from Period Nirvana quiz 🩸🤩 there’s no “one size fits all” #menstrualcup #periodtok #periodtips #periodcup

♬ Sixty Second Commercial 1 by Michael Reynolds – malcolm

Using a clear cross-sectioned model of the female reproductive system, it showcases exactly what's happening when using a period cup. The vaginal walls secure it into place and sits just under the cervix, catching blood as it drips (or let's be real–occasionally gushes) from the uterus. And no, it cannot just wiggle its way up inside you getting lost like your car keys at the bottom of your beach bag. PROMISE. You might think so without this awesome visual, but look! Not possible.

It also highlights the fact that once it's properly in place, it should be comfortable and undetectable. A proper fit and insertion allows the narrowest portion to fit snugly in the vaginal canal as the top expands into the space of the vaginal fornix. (My only critique is that the stem should not sit down that low. If you can feel it between your labia, it's not going to be a good time. I can personally attest to this discomfort and no thank you.)

Once it's filled up, the video shows how easy it can be to remove and dispose of the collected blood. Reach up (bearing down if you need to), pinch to release the suction and pull it out. Ta-dah! In this demo they show the cup with 10 milliliters of fluid inside. For reference, most people shed between 30-60 milliliters throughout an entire cycle and most cups can hold around 30 milliliters. That means you can set it and forget for up to 12 hours–unlike tampons which require far more trips to the bathroom.

Not all the comments suggest everyone is as eager to convert as I was. There's definitely a lot of questions and anxiety, but the more you know, right? Period cups may not be for everybody, but my biggest regret was not trying one sooner. And now that I know how it works, I'm even more on board.

If your interest is piqued enough to give it a try, here are some of my favorites! (Trust me. I've tested a lot.)

My Favorite Period Cups

DivaCup

$39.99

1. DivaCup

It’s hard to say whether the DivaCup is the most popular cup on the market because it’s the best or because it’s the one most widely available on drugstore shelves. In any event, it’s been around since 2003 and managed to convert me. It comes in three different sizes.

Cora Cup

Cora

$39

2. The Easy Does It Cup

If you’re new to the cup game, Cora’s style makes it a great option for beginners (and pros alike!). It’s narrower at the bottom than most, showing you exactly where to pinch and fold for insertion. It’s also made from notably thinner and more flexible silicone than any that I’ve tested. (And trust me, I’ve tested a LOT.) But the best part each purchase gives health education and pads to girls who need them. What’s not to love about all of that?

Lena

$24.60

3. Lena cup

I chose the Lena when looking for a replacement based on the recommendation of the founders at Put a Cup In It (who also have a great quiz to help you find your match). It’s their top pick for starting out and I have to agree. The tulip shape of the Lena makes it easy to insert and also seems to help keep it from leaking.