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It's been a little over two months since I lost my mom to cancer. When I say the words “I lost my mom" out loud, they don't seem right, because a lost sock can be found again. This isn't just a missing sock. This is a huge hole in my gut, which will never, ever go away.

Losing a parent means you've joined a club with people who understand that just walking out the front door with your shoes on and your hair washed can be a challenge. It means that grocery shopping and picking up brussels sprouts, and remembering how much your mom loved to eat them once she realized she could cook them in the oven rather than boiling them, and they actually tasted good, makes your eyes start to burn.

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It's wanting to go for a run to create endorphins to stop the screaming of, “Your mom died!" that keeps running in your head over and over, but you can't because you also want to curl up in a ball and cry while watching “Gilmore Girls" on Netflix because it was “your thing" growing up with her.

There are a million things that change and take on new meanings and shapes. There are a million words that suddenly don't seem so nice anymore. There are a million faces that don't bring comfort like they used to.

I know time will help. This isn't my first loss, but it is the hardest.

So here are a few things that happen when your mom dies, in case you wanted to know where my head has been lately, or if you're trying to figure out why your friend who lost her own mom smells like a garbage can half the time, or cries at a simple Pampers commercial.

You cry a lot, and at random times. I can't begin to tell you how many times I've seen a cute commercial and started sobbing hysterically. Maybe the character's mom was cheering them on at a soccer game, or maybe she was just giving them a hug. Literally anything that shows another mom in it will have you crying.

Don't even get me started on walking around in public and seeing another mom with their child. I'm planning a wedding right now and almost started weeping when I was at a wedding show and they asked for mother/daughter duos to come on stage and win a prize. Sure, it wasn't meant to hurt me, but it burned.

You may get closer to your dad. This isn't really a negative. When you lose your mom, you suddenly realize that you need your dad's support and strength more than ever. While he's grieving as well, there's something special about sharing this together and being able to reminisce as a pair. You realize that you start telling your dad about your day in the same way you used to tell your mom, in hopes that maybe things will feel normal. It doesn't, but it does help a little to know that someone still has your back, and you're not going into every situation alone.

Life seems like you're permanently wearing sunglasses, never the same brightness it was before. I don't know how to explain this to someone who hasn't lost a parent. Just trust me, nothing will have the same brightness after you lose your mom. Those cute shoes at the store you were eyeing suddenly just seem like a stupid idea. That new casserole you wanted to make? Its ingredients are still at the back of the pantry collecting dust. You'll get back in the routine someday, but it won't be today.

You've joined a club with supportive people—one you never wanted to be in. No one ever wants to join the “I lost a parent" club. Fortunately when you do, you'll find that these are the people you needed in your life and they came at the perfect time. These are the people who will set their cell phone to a different ringer for you so they absolutely won't miss your call at 2am. These are the people who let you cuss like a sailor every other word because life is just not fair anymore. These are the people who will let you still be upset a month, a year, even 10 years from now. That brings me to my next point…

People seem to expect you to be okay after about a week or two. If they aren't a part of the “I lost a parent" club, people expect you to be okay pretty fast. Once the shock of the funeral (if you had one—we didn't) wears off, people will slowly start to forget about your pain and expect you to be normal again. It's okay to avoid people for a little while. It's okay to still be grieving. Remind those you love how hard this is. Sometimes people are so focused on themselves, they forget how to be a real friend.

You can never fully grieve because something new hits you every day. When my mom passed away, I was on my second day of a three-week trip overseas. I had to push my grieving back because I wasn't home and I had school and places to see. There was no funeral, so no reason to go home. My mom had wanted it this way.

I tried to push through and be okay, I really did. But grief would slip out of me and I would find myself hysterically crying in the middle of a street in Dublin. When I got home, I still felt like I should be okay, at least for my son and my dad. I didn't want them to think I was falling apart. So I held a lot of my sadness inside. It's hard to fully grieve, especially when you're a parent. When I'm trying to remember what ingredients my mom used in her special lasagna, I find myself grieving all over again. It never really stops, you just learn to accept it.

Your child's curious words will make your heart hurt. My son is four so death is not something he's used to. Trying to explain to a four-year-old the idea of someone being gone is pretty impossible. We tried the “Mom-Mom is in heaven and she's an angel and always looking down on you" stuff. And for the most part it works, but then there are the days where he's reminding me, “Mommy, you don't have a mom anymore," where my heart breaks all over again. He doesn't know it's mean, he just says it like a statement. Because it's true, I don't. But man do those words hurt.

You'll experience a whole new kind of pain when you start to see how much it's affected your children. On the flip side to him being curious, he's also very sad. When my mom began receiving Hospice care, my son regressed and started wetting the bed at night again. We've tried everything to make him stop.

When I'm tucking him in and his tiny voice says things like, “I miss Mom-Mom," or, “Why does Mom-Mom have to die?" my heart aches. He constantly brings her up and while he might not always sound sad, I can tell that this is harder on him than he lets on. I just wish I could hold all his broken pieces together so he doesn't have to experience this kind of pain.

You may try to scour their phone, Facebook account, Netflix account, etc. searching for one last message, and it'll likely drive you bonkers. My mom and I shared a Netflix account which I now feel so thankful for. It's weird, but all I want to do is know my mom better. I searched through her phone looking for advice. I check Netflix to see what shows she was obsessed with. I went on her Facebook account looking for answers to questions I didn't even know I had.

I try to find notebooks with her handwriting, hoping maybe she left a note for me somewhere. It will frustrate you to do this, but you can't help it. You just need one more piece of her, however tiny it is.

You'll be jealous of everyone else who still has a mom. (Especially when they take her for granted.) From this point forward, you shall never complain about your parent in front of me again. Because darling, you have no idea how lucky you are and how much I want to be in your shoes. Cherish them. Love them. Be thankful you have one more day with them.

Hug your babies tight. Tell your mom you love her. Seek her advice and wisdom. Don't take these moments for granted. You only have one mom, and when she's gone you'll wish you'd never said an ugly word to her your whole life.

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    Jalyssa says she learned to embrace agility throughout her motherhood journey. Here's more from this incredible mama of five boys.

    What is the most challenging part of your day as a mom of five?

    Time management! I want to meet each of the boys' individual needs—plus show up for myself—but I often feel like someone gets overlooked.

    What's the best part of being a mom of five?

    The little moments of love. The hugs, the kisses, the cuddles, the smiles... they all serve as little reminders that I am blessed and I'm doing okay.

    Are there misconceptions about raising boys?

    There are so many misconceptions about raising boys. I think the biggest one is that boys don't have many emotions and they're just so active all the time. My boys display many emotions and they also love to be sweet and cuddly a lot of the time.

    What do you think would surprise people the most about being a mom of five?

    How much I enjoy it. I never knew I wanted to be a mom until I was pregnant with my first. My desire only grew and the numbers did! I am surprised with every single baby as my capacity to love and nurture grows. It's incredible.

    How do you create balance and make time for yourself?

    Balance for me looks like intentional planning and scheduling because I never want my boys to feel like they aren't my first priority, but it is extremely difficult. What I try to do is not fit it all into one day. I have work days because motherhood is my first priority. I fit in segments of self-care after the kids' bedtime so I don't grow weary.

    What's the biggest lesson you have learned from motherhood?

    I have learned that sacrifice is actually beautiful. I was terrified of the selflessness motherhood would require, but I've grown so much through the sacrifice. There is nothing better than living for something bigger than myself.

    When did you first feel like a mom? How has your motherhood evolved?

    I first felt like a mom when I was pregnant with my first son and I intentionally chose to change my eating habits so my body could be strong and healthy for him. I didn't have to think twice—I just did what I thought would be best for him. That decision being so effortless made me realize I was made for motherhood.

    My perspective has changed with each baby as I've realized motherhood doesn't have to be one-size-fits-all. With my first son, I was a by-the-book mama and it was so stressful. With each baby, I have felt more freedom and it has made motherhood so much more beautiful. I have evolved into the mother that they need, I am perfect for these boys.

    This article was sponsored by Dr. Brown's. Thank you for supporting the brands that support Motherly and mamas.


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