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This morning I woke up to a yard full of snow. Tonight I will be trick-or-treating with my soon-to-be 4-year-old.

It's not ideal, but it is tradition. October is an annoying time of year, weather-wise, in many parts of North America. In my town, we just keep calm and put our mittens on, but in other cities across North America parents are engaged in Halloween debate.

With much of the east coast expecting rain and parts of the Midwest already shoveling snow, moms and municipal leaders are wondering if trick-or-treating should be postponed. Montreal's mayor is asking parents to postpone their Halloween due to rain, but as Chicago is getting it's earliest winter since the 1980s, some parents are suggesting we all pretend like it's the 1980s and get on with it.

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A Facebook post is going viral, declaring that "rain on Halloween will not kill your child" and asking "What would your mom have done on October 31, 1984?"

"She would have either trailed behind you in the station wagon to stay dry (while possibly smoking with the windows rolled up and sipping on a wine cooler) while you trick-or-treated in the rain, or you would have headed out together with umbrellas," Brittany Marie Haight notes in her viral post.

As someone who spent a few 1980s and '90s Halloweens wearing her costume over her snowsuit, I get this mom's point, but I can also see the appeal of waiting for better weather.

And if it wasn't the weather we would still be talking about moving Halloween, because we talk about it every year.

There are plenty of parents who dislike tick-or-treating on weeknights and many communities have been wondering if they should just move Halloween to the closest Saturday each year (for safety's sake).

As CBS reported last year, more than 33,000 parents signed a change.org petition suggesting we move Halloween to the weekend, specifically the last Saturday in October. Parents in favor of the move say the holiday is just not as much fun when it happens on a hectic workday (although it is totally possible to make it work).

It's not like moving the day around a bit is an unprecedented move. Thanksgiving isn't on a specific date, but rather the fourth Thursday in November. Likewise, Memorial Day is always the last Monday in May.

But unlike those holidays, Halloween isn't a "real" holiday in the sense that nobody gets the day off. Businesses aren't closed. The world is still running, we're just running it in funny clothes.

In some communities, parents are already making this change on their own, arranging trick-or-treating around the block on the last Saturday of October in order to save themselves the hassle of a weekday Halloween, but if more parents push for the change, we could all do it.

Next year we will get a Halloween on a Saturday. I'm crossing my fingers for good weather.

[A version of this story was first posted on October 31, 2018. It has been updated.]

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Motherhood is a practice in learning, growing and loving more than you ever thought possible. Even as a "veteran" mama of four young sons and one newly adopted teenager, Jalyssa Richardson enthusiastically adapts to whatever any given day has in store—a skill she says she's refined through the years.

Here's what just one day in her life looks like:


Jalyssa says she learned to embrace agility throughout her motherhood journey. Here's more from this incredible mama of five boys.

What is the most challenging part of your day as a mom of five?

Time management! I want to meet each of the boys' individual needs—plus show up for myself—but I often feel like someone gets overlooked.

What's the best part of being a mom of five?

The little moments of love. The hugs, the kisses, the cuddles, the smiles... they all serve as little reminders that I am blessed and I'm doing okay.

Are there misconceptions about raising boys?

There are so many misconceptions about raising boys. I think the biggest one is that boys don't have many emotions and they're just so active all the time. My boys display many emotions and they also love to be sweet and cuddly a lot of the time.

What do you think would surprise people the most about being a mom of five?

How much I enjoy it. I never knew I wanted to be a mom until I was pregnant with my first. My desire only grew and the numbers did! I am surprised with every single baby as my capacity to love and nurture grows. It's incredible.

How do you create balance and make time for yourself?

Balance for me looks like intentional planning and scheduling because I never want my boys to feel like they aren't my first priority, but it is extremely difficult. What I try to do is not fit it all into one day. I have work days because motherhood is my first priority. I fit in segments of self-care after the kids' bedtime so I don't grow weary.

What's the biggest lesson you have learned from motherhood?

I have learned that sacrifice is actually beautiful. I was terrified of the selflessness motherhood would require, but I've grown so much through the sacrifice. There is nothing better than living for something bigger than myself.

When did you first feel like a mom? How has your motherhood evolved?

I first felt like a mom when I was pregnant with my first son and I intentionally chose to change my eating habits so my body could be strong and healthy for him. I didn't have to think twice—I just did what I thought would be best for him. That decision being so effortless made me realize I was made for motherhood.

My perspective has changed with each baby as I've realized motherhood doesn't have to be one-size-fits-all. With my first son, I was a by-the-book mama and it was so stressful. With each baby, I have felt more freedom and it has made motherhood so much more beautiful. I have evolved into the mother that they need, I am perfect for these boys.

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