Sometimes being a mom can feel like you're the Wizard of Oz. You're behind the curtain pulling all the levers to make stuff happen, but all the credit goes to some fantastic fictional character, not the flesh-and-blood human working hard behind the curtain.

That's why this Easter, Kelly Clarkson pulled back the curtain for her two kids, 4-year-old daughter River and 3-year-old son Remington, and let them know who really left those Easter baskets.

"I kind of just was like, 'Mommy and daddy did these for you.' I knew my mom always did it," Clarkson tells People.

She continues: "Sometimes I'm tired of giving credit to non-existent things. Like I'm very busy, and I took the time to shop at Target and put this all together. I did this — no bunny! They got chocolate, so they're fine."

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We totally get it, Kelly.

Moms are the family managers, personal shoppers and magic makers and we often don't get credit for that.

Of course, it's totally understandable if a parent wants to give credit to the Easter bunny (that's a tradition for a lot of families) but it is also pretty cool to see a mother letting her kids know that Mom is the one making all this stuff happen.

It's not like Clarkson isn't letting her kids enjoy Easter traditions (they totally had an egg hunt and painted eggs with mama), she's just taking credit where it's due.

And Clarkson isn't the only celeb to take this route. Kristen Bell and Dax Shepard told their daughters, 6-year-old Lincoln and 4-year-old Delta, the truth about Santa.

"This is going to be very controversial," Shepard told Us Weekly last year. "I have a fundamental rule that I will never lie to them, which is challenging at times. Our 5-year-old started asking questions like, 'Well, this doesn't make sense, and that doesn't make sense.' I'm like, 'You know what? This is just a fun thing we pretend while it's Christmas.'"

According to Shepard, this has not diminished the magic of Christmas in their home. "They love watching movies about Santa, they love talking about Santa," Shepard told Us. "They don't think he exists, but they're super happy and everything's fine."

The Bell-Shepard kids know that Kristen and Dax are the ones putting the gifts under the tree just like Clarkson's kids know mom bought the chocolates at Target, and that's totally okay. They understand how much effort their parents are putting into making them happy on a special day.

These kids know their parents love them. And that is a powerful, magical truth.

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