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We know many mothers are excited by the possibilities of flexible micro-businesses (small businesses that allow you to work on the schedule you determine), but many aren't sure exactly what skills and services they could sell.


So we've done the upfront work to create a list of them for inspiration, especially the not-so-obvious ones, or the small, hyper-specific slices of more well-known services.

This resulting list is hopefully just a starting point—take a look!

Food + cooking

We have to eat—every day, in fact. If you're passionate about food, cooking or grocery shopping (I envy you for this one), there are lots of micro-business opportunities.

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1. Home chef/meal prep: For busy people that want to eat healthy and are done with takeout. You can even specialize in a particular region of cuisine.

2. Recipe planning and grocery list planning: If you're obsessed with food blogs, a pro at organizing but aren't looking to cook, consider this one. Maybe someone is okay cooking for themselves, but they're having trouble finding recipes they like and planning the grocery lists to bring them to life.

3. Dessert creation: Make a killer Magic Bar or picture-perfect cupcake? Sell that to someone for their next party.

4. Cake decorating: Pro at fondant and can make a cake that looks like anything? Your neighbor would much rather hire you than their grocery store bakery department.

5. Healthy eating planning: someone wants to clean up their diet and doesn't know where to start? You'd be good at this if you've done the Whole30 and actually found delicious recipes that fit into it.

Organizing

Many people sell full-scale home organization services, but perhaps there's one room, item, or area of life that you excel at organizing. Be super specific and sell just that.

Here are some ideas:

1. Fridge or pantry: reorganize the contents and set someone up with a system that will keep things in place going forward.

2. Closets: Do you actually look forward to switching things out for the change of season? Color code your closet like a boss? Actually have an proper place for shoes/hats/scarves?

3. Kids closets: Like the above, but specifically focused on kids because they grow out of things so darn fast!

4. Basement or garage overhaul: Bins, boxes, labels, all sorted in a logical way that doesn't make the basement a scary place.

5. Art work: Kids bring home lots of it and no one wants to hurt their feelings by throwing it out. Come up with a plan for sorting through and displaying it in a way that works for everyone.

6. Organize my inbox, tabs, folders, triggers, filters: I really wish I could be one of those people that has the perfect folder, color, and tab for every piece of correspondence that hits their inbox and actually adheres to that system.

7. Finances: Get someone set up with the online (or offline—hello envelopes!) tools for organizing their personal finances and getting good budgets and systems in place.

8. Book all my appointments/things I have been putting off: Enough said.

9. Pack a family for vacation: If you pack your suitcases days before vacation and have traveled with your family enough times to know exactly what's needed, this one's for you.

10. Calendar planning for parents: Help a busy parent schedule appointments, various kids' extracurriculars and figure out where they'll need childcare or transportation help to make it all happen.

11. College move-in prep: It's an emotional roller coaster when a kid goes to college and also a very logistic-heavy time. Help an overwhelmed family with dorm packing, shopping, and other planning to navigate this major life change.

12. Photo organizing: Organize overflowing boxes, computers and phones full of photo files. Go a step further and put them into beautiful displays or books.

13. Fitness routine planning: No need to physically train anyone. Work with clients based on their goals, come up with a recommendation of fitness activities, gym classes, and the schedule to fit it into their life.

14. Picking up prescriptions and other essentials: From the woman who has left her prescriptions at CVS for weeks on end, despite their incessant automatic phone calls.

15. Ebay reselling: So many ways to offload and make money from stuff you are done with, but many people can't get around to it. Open up your own virtual consignment shop by helping them resell on eBay and more.

Business + communications

Take the talents you've honed over the years and offer them to small businesses or non-profits on a more flexible basis.

1. Negotiating: Coach someone on learning to advocate for themselves, in anything from a tough situation at work to asking for a refund for a service they're not pleased with.

2. Emails: No one loves them, everyone's got to write them. Write a small business' marketing emails to customers, in areas like: welcomes, announcements, promotions, sales, and more.

3. Cold outreach emails: Perhaps even more painful than most emails. In business it's always good to go in with a warm connection, but sometimes you just have to reach out cold. If you've mastered this art, coach someone on how to write good pitch emails that get answered.

4. Communications and tact: Similar to negotiating, but a step further. Perhaps a business owner needs help creating a compelling case for a potential client who doesn't want to pay them what they're asking for, or addressing other customer conflicts.

5. Slide deck creation: I envy people who can make beautiful and thoughtful PowerPoint decks in business settings. Mine always end up having too much text. If you're a master at making cohesive points and pulling in the right visuals, there's a great market for you.

6. Market research: Track down stats and statistics to support someone else's slide decks, business pitches, product planning, and more.

7. Office setup/decorating for collaboration and morale boosting: I have a friend who set his office up with lightbulbs that flashed different colors as the company hit their goals, which was super motivating for all. If you have creative hacks to help offices look and feel their best, sell that!

8. Customer service assistance: Answer online product questions, returns and exchange requests, and other customer service needs that will help a small business (or non profit) put their best foot forward.

9. Social media content planning: Busy executives need to know what's happening in their industry, but don't have the time to read all the articles or follow all the relevant people. Do this for them, hand off the right tweets to share, and make them look great in the process.

Entertainment

Whether it's providing flexible, creative activities and outlets for kids to making it easier for parents to throw parties, there are lots of options here to suit a whole range of passions and talents

1. Music lessons for kids and babies: So many instruments, so many ages to benefit from music.

2. Art lessons: Same, but with all the different visual art mediums.

3. Museum outings: Organize outings to art museums and more. Especially helpful for mothers with multiple kids or new babies, but toddlers who still need to have fun!

4. Wine advice: This one's for the parents (or the adult who's running the kids outings ;)). No need to be a sommelier or even have a license. Joanne helps people come up with the perfect pairings for parties and other intimate social outings and leaves the purchasing to them.

5. Party themes: Cute first birthday parties are all the rage but there is no way I'm going to plan one. Help me!

6. Party favors: Go a layer deeper and just focus on creative trinkets for guests to take away

7. Summer vacation planning for family: Camps, playdates, travel and more. Lots of free time to kill and lots of ways it could go. Help a family scour the options in the area, understand the costs, and make smart decisions that keep things running as smooth as they did during the school year. Do some of the entertaining yourself even!

Home Management & Cleaning

There are lots of great generalists when it comes to cleaning, but not everyone needs a frequent house cleaner, or they may just want to outsource that deep cleaning tasks that are the toughest to drum up the motivation for. Here are some ideas.

1. Handywoman: Patch up holes, hammer in nails, tackle the repairs that so many of us ignore for months (or years).

2. Window washing: Speaking of, I'm pretty sure people go on for years without doing this, and once done it instantly elevates a space.

3. Deep floor cleaning (and moving all my stuff to go with it): So necessary, so hard to do!

4. Cabinet cleaning, kitchen counter conditioning: in the theme of deep cleaning things that are important but hard to do.

5. Laundry: It never ends. New York City has lots of laundry services; they are harder to come by in the suburbs where people have washing machines in home, but they still seem incredibly helpful.

6. Household management: Laundry folding and organization, packing kids' lunches and daycare bags, creating lists for errands and more.

7. Home Depot planning and shopping: This place takes hours off my family's life and seems so hard to navigate. Come up with a plan for me to get what I need out of it and get out.

Technology

Cheryl's business (tech consulting that connects tech-savvy teens with adults who are, well, less skilled at understanding their smart phones) is a brilliant example of the problems to be solved here.

1. Think through apps I need in my life: As someone who previously worked at an app company, I know how useful they can be—but there are so many out there it's hard to know where to begin. If you're on top of the tech and gadget blogs, turn your passion into something that can improve the quality of someone else's life.

2. Computer shortcut help: Help someone make the most of their computer and iPad's tricks and shortcuts so they're not wasting time on things they shouldn't be

3. Graphic design software lessons: If you're well-versed in a software like Adobe Photoshop (or any others), help someone get up to speed and empowered to create their own simple graphics and more.

4. Camera lessons: Teach simple tricks to help someone take better pictures of their dogs or kids.

Design & Style

Pinterest and HGTV have really brought the creative and design talent out of people. If you want to share your passion with the world, there are lots of simple, resourceful ways to do it.

1. Individual room design: Sara focuses on kids' rooms but maybe you can't get enough of subway tile and bathroom design Pinterest boards.

2. Pillow, lighting, rug, etc refresh: So many places to buy decor these days that it can make it hard to pull the trigger. Ease someone's anxiety by understanding their design tastes, budgets, and scouring big websites and stores for a range of options for them to choose from.

3. Shop at Ikea/Target/Salvation Army/you name it: Take it a step further and shop through physical stores for additional inspiration. Bonus points if you like to hit up thrift or antique shops!

4. Holiday decorating: Bring your love of all things festive to someone else's home.

5. Pick paint colors: I nominate my mother for this. She can pick out a specific Benjamin Moore color on sight and knows exactly which beige is too green (apparently beige has green in it?). Someone else out there has to be like her, right?

6. Hang up pictures post move: Raise your hand if you've left your walls blank for an embarrassing amount of time after moving into a new place? If only there were someone to pick out and measure frames and figure out your art and photos to go in them. That someone could be you.

7. Renovation organization: Lots of old homes are in need of upgrades and lots of HGTV to make people want to buy their own fixer uppers. Surely they'll need help sorting through plans, vendors, and more.

8. Small repair coordination: Source electricians, plumbers, and other handy-people and book appointments.

Now's your turn. Tell us what YOU dream of doing, if only someone would pay you!

Originally published on Pepperlane.co.

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As sweet as it may be to cuddle, cradle, or carry your baby all day, at some point you — and your arms — need a break. Naptime offers a brief respite, but what happens when you have more to do than can be accomplished during baby's afternoon snooze?

During Best of Baby Month, Walmart.com is offering big online savings on must-have multitasking products (think exersaucers and activity centers) that allow you to keep an eye on baby while still tackling things like housekeeping, work, or that best-seller you just borrowed from the library. Your little one will be happily occupied (just not, you know, unattended) and you'll be relieved to have the use of your arms again.

Ready to save money and a bit of sanity, mama? Check out these items and more online now through September 30.

Fisher-Price 4-in-1 Step N'Play Piano

Walmart_BestofBaby

Your little musician will stay busy exploring more than 20 stimulating activities with lights and sounds, including drums, music note sliders, a tambourine, a microphone rattle, and more. They can even play the keyboard with their feet; the soft interactive play mat makes noise, too. Hearing baby entertain themself while you get to multitask will be music to your ears!

Price: $79 (regularly $90)

SHOP

Fisher-Price Infant-to-Toddler Rocker

Walmart_BestofBaby

Guns 'N Roses got it right when they sang, "Welcome to the jungle, we've got fun and games!" This colorful jungle-themed rocker will entertain baby with overhead toys that spin and clack. When they're tired of rocking (out), there's a kickstand to hold it in place and calming vibrations to soothe.

Price: 29.98 (regularly $37.87)

SHOP

Evenflo Exersaucer Bounce and Learn Sweet Tea Party

Walmart_BestofBaby

Baby can rock, bounce, spin, and reach in this sweetly designed exersaucer. While you're preparing dinner or scarfing down lunch, your little one can be enjoying their own tea party, complete with stacking cakes, a fun flip book, a self-discovery mirror, and other fine motor activities. Toss the removable seat cover in the washing machine when it needs cleaning because messes are inevitable in the kitchen.

Price: $44 (regularly $59)

SHOP

Graco Blossom 6-in-1 Convertible High Chair

Walmart_BestofBaby

Kitchen tables aren't just for eating—and neither are high chairs! Let your little one keep you company in the kitchen in this adjustable high chair that converts into six different seating options ranging from an infant high chair to a youth seat. Safely secured with your choice of either a 3- or 5-point harness, they can play with toys on the dishwasher safe tray while you get things done.

Price: $112.49 (regularly $134.99)

SHOP

Graco DuetSoothe Baby Swing and Rocker

Walmart_BestofBaby

When baby's acting fussy, give your arms a rest and let this cozy infant swing rock them 'til they're calm. You can even customize it based on your little one's preferences; the music-playing swing can move side-to-side or front-to-back. Plus, there's a plush mobile and mirrored dome to help distract them from whatever was causing that irritability in the first place.

Price: $98.99 (regularly $169.99)

SHOP

This article was sponsored by Walmart. Thank you for supporting the brands that support Motherly and mamas.

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[Content warning: This article references maternal suicide.]

Before she gave birth to her daughter, Dr. Stephanie Liu, a Clinical Lecturer with the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Alberta, expected she would breastfeed, but after extolling the benefits of breastfeeding to her patients for years, nursing did not come easily for Liu—but the guilt did.

"I struggled to get her to latch and when she did latch it was very painful. As a result, my milk supply was insufficient. For the first two weeks, I supplemented with formula and was racked with guilt that I was not doing the best for Madi," she writes for The Conversation

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She is hardly alone in this. A recent commentary in the journal Nursing for Women's Health explains that "[p]sychological pressure to exclusively breastfeed has the potential to contribute to postpartum depression symptoms in new mothers who are unable to achieve their breastfeeding intentions."

Liu points out that a large 2011 study found mothers who had negative breastfeeding experiences were more likely to have symptoms of depression. On a personal level, she understands why.

"Breastfeeding was one of the things I looked forward to most when I was pregnant. In medical school I learned about the bond between mothers and babies when they are breastfeeding. I could not wait to experience this," Liu explains, adding that breastfeeding her daughter Madi turned out to be way more challenging than she had anticipated.

For Liu, this experience changed the way she practices medicine, and she hopes that in sharing it she may change the way other medical professionals counsel their patients.

"As a family doctor, I know that breast milk is the optimal feeding choice for health benefits, but as a mom, I know the extreme pressures that we are placed under as women to produce milk every time our baby needs it," she says.

The extreme pressure to breastfeed

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends mothers exclusively breastfeed their babies for the first six months of life, but ACOG also officially recognizes that a baby's mother "is uniquely qualified to decide whether exclusive breastfeeding, mixed feeding or formula feeding is optimal for her and her infant."

Unfortunately, many moms don't feel that they have a choice. They just want to do what is "best" for their baby, and when they can't they feel like failures.

Mom Jen Harper was convinced that breastfeeding was the way to go, and felt devastated (and exhausted) when no matter what she tried, it just didn't work for her and her son. "I'd been conditioned to think that since I was a woman, breastfeeding would be the most natural thing I've ever done," Harper writes.

She finally found relief when an ear, nose and throat specialist told her that not every baby is a fit for every breast.

"I had to give up the notion that this was, in fact, a failure, because it wasn't. I had to let go of my notion that everyone around me was judging me for pulling out a bottle and powder instead of delicately unclipping my cute nursing bra," she explains.

Harper came to terms with the fact that supplementing with formula was better for her son than having "a sobbing mommy."

But research shows a lot of moms are sobbing over this issue and don't get the advice Harper did.

"Breast is best" was a super successful public health campaign, but it has created a maternal mental health crisis. A growing number of new moms are dying by suicide, and some of the fathers left to raise babies as single dads are speaking out about the role the extreme pressure to breastfeed can play in fatal cases of postpartum depression.

Vancouver father Kim Chen lost his wife Florence Leung in 2016 shortly after they became parents. Their dreams were coming true, but Leung was under so much pressure and died by suicide.

"I still remember reading a handout upon Flo's discharge from hospital with the line 'Breast Milk Should Be the Exclusive Food For the Baby for the First Six Months.' I also remember posters on the maternity unit 'Breast is Best.' While agreeing to the benefits of breast milk, there NEED[s] to be an understanding that it is okay to supplement with formula, and that formula is a completely viable option," Chen wrote in a Facebook post after his wife's death.

Their son thrived on formula after his mother died. He was in the 90th percentile.

Support is best

According to Suzanne Barston, the author of Bottled Up: How the Way We Feed Babies Has Come to Define Motherhood, and Why It Shouldn't, it's time for those who support mothers—physicians like Liu, but also midwives, doulas, and those leading mom and baby support groups—to offer "solid, sensitive, personalized advice" to all mothers.

It's been over a decade since Barston launched her blog, The Fearless Formula Feeder and witnessed the evolution of online discussion of infant feeding go from "breast is breast" to "fed is best", but she says the conversation really needs to be a lot more nuanced than three word catch-phrases.

In 2018 she spoke to Motherly about why moms who use formula often feel unsupported in our society, and noted that while there has been a big shift in the last decade in terms of how people speak to and about moms who choose to supplement with formula, the choice to not breastfeed altogether is still not seen as a legitimate choice.

Moms feel like society doesn't support them overall, but when it comes to infant feeding, moms feel very unsupported. Moms are told they must do everything possible to succeed at breastfeeding, but that's extremely difficult in a society where many parents must go back to work when their infants are mere weeks old.

Yes, breastfeeding rates in America are lower than the World Health Organization would like, but this isn't because moms aren't educated about the benefits of breastfeeding. There are few among us who don't know the benefits of breastfeeding. In many cases, moms would like to breastfeed but can't because they don't have the support system to actually make it work.

"Whether you're feeling physically uncomfortable from your birth or you have to make dinner for your two other kids or you have to go back to work in three weeks, those are all very real issues that women have to deal with and no amount of awareness or education about breastfeeding changes," Barston told Motherly.

How to help mothers

Like Barston, Liu harnessed the power of the internet after her own infant feeding journey, and now supports other mothers in theirs through her blog, her blog Life of Dr. Mom.

It took having her own postpartum experience for Liu to learn that breast isn't always best, and she's changed the way she supports new mothers as a medical practitioner. There's just so much more nuance to this than "breast is best." You can't fit her thoughts as neatly on a poster, but her words are worthy of maternity ward walls and pamphlets and could save the lives.

"I always support the idea to breastfeed if you can, to reach out for support, and if you are struggling, there are other safe and healthy options to ensure your baby is well fed," she explains.

If you are struggling with postpartum depression, here are the resources you need.

If you are feeding your baby formula, breast milk or both, know that we support you and that you are a good mother.

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News

Fall is officially here! And whether you're excited about it or not, it's the perfect time to introduce little ones to fall crafts.

Fall DIY crafts are especially fun to do during that tricky gap between errands and dinner. It's not easy, but I try to do a couple of weekly crafts with my kids during this time. Lately, we've been inspired by the changing leaves and dropping temperatures, which we're channeling into some pretty cool artwork. If you're looking for fun fall activities, we've got you covered.

Here are 50 fall-themed crafts that are perfect for doing with little kids:

1. Fingerprint trees

With stamp ink or paint, make leaves on drawn-out trees using your fingerprints. These are fun, easy to make and easy to clean up!

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2. Popcorn music makers

Save those old tissue paper rolls, tape the ends with wax paper and fill them with popcorn kernels. Let your little ones decorate the outside and create some music!

3. Apple painting

Slice apples in half, paint and use them to stamp on paper. That makes for a fun afternoon—and good use of those excess apples.

4. Leaf art

There are so many different things you can do with leaves, but one of my favorite is to just create simple fun pictures with them. You can make animals out of them, trace around them or create a cool collage. The options are endless!

5. Leaf people

Take googly eyes, leaves, toothpicks, glue and construction paper and you can create one fun leaf dude!

6. Paper plate pumpkins

Paint paper plates orange, add a green construction paper stem and a brown pipe cleaner for a squiggly vine. Then let your toddler get creative with some finger paint for the face!

7. Fall wreaths

Using the leaves your little one collected this fall season, craft a fun leaf wreath for the backdoor.


8. Acorn handprints

Using two different shades of brown paint, paint the top of you little one's hand with the darker shade and the bottom with the lighter shade. Press their hand down on a piece of construction paper and you've got an acorn!

9. Pumpkin painting

Spread some newspaper out on the table or floor, grab a few pumpkins and paint the day away.

10. Cheerios on the cob

Cut out a few pieces of paper shaped like corn cobs and let your little one glue on some cheerios to make kernels.

11. Sucker ghouls

Wrap tootsie pops or dumdums with coffee filters, tie the underneath portion with a small piece of string and take a black marker to make two eyes. You've got cute little ghouls with something sweet underneath!

12. Scarecrow puppets

Using paper bags and some construction paper, make scarecrow puppets. These are fun to make—and play with!

13. Q-tip skeletons

Help your little one craft a skeleton with Q-tips glued to black paper.

14. Tissue pie slice

Cut up some pieces of tissue paper and a slice of construction paper. Then let your little one glue away! Try orange paper for pumpkin pie, brown for pecans and green for apples.

15. Thankful tree

Draw a tree on a piece of paper and write the things that your little one is thankful for on smaller pieces of paper. Let me glue those pieces to their tree and continue to go over the things they are thankful for and why they are thankful for those things.

16. Pumpkin rocks

Paint rocks with orange and black to create pumpkins and jack-o-lanterns. Hide a few around town if you are feeling up to it!

17. Paper plate bat

Paint or color paper plates and coffee filters black. Glue the coffee filters to the sides of the paper plate to mimic wings. Add some fun eyes, sharp teeth and a piece of string at the top and hang these from the ceiling.

18. Gauze mummies

Grab some gauze out of the first aid kit that's tucked away in the closet, cut it up and let your little one make some funny gauze mummies. Add a set of googly eyes to the mummy when done.

19. Paper plate owls

Using paper plates, muffin tin liners and brown paper bag trimmings, make an owl to hang on the refrigerator.

20. Leaf mobiles

Tie some fallen leaves from the backyard to some fishing wire and hang them on an embroidery hoop. You can hang these in their room or even outside for some fun, seasonal decor!


21. Apple suncatchers

Cut the an outline of an apple and stick it to contact paper. Then cut out small pieces of tissue paper, fill the inner apple with those pieces, top with addition contact paper, cut out and hang it on your window. When the sun sets in the evening, it will catch the apple just right and beam a ray of fun colors throughout your house.

22. Bubble wrap corn

Save that bubble wrap that comes in your weekly Amazon shipment, cut it out in the shape of a piece of corn, paint it and let dry.

23. Tissue paper bird feeder

Empty tissue paper rolls make great bird feeders. Let your little one smear peanut butter on them, roll them in birdseed, string them and hang them outside.

24. Tissue candy corn

To recreate this yummy snack, use yellow, orange and white tissue paper to create the shape of candy corn.

25. Puffy cotton ball ghosts

For this fun activity, all you need are cotton balls, black construction paper and some googly eyes. These are super cute and fun to touch!

26. Paper plate spider webs

Using a hole puncher, cut holes around the outside of a paper plate and let your little one string yarn throughout the holes. This little craft is great for those fine motor skills!

27. Clothes pin bats

Paint coffee filters and clothespins black, clip them together and string them with some fishing wire. These make for great pieces of Halloween decor!

28. Corn painting

Use a few ears of corn to paint with. The patterns are fun and who doesn't love to paint with food!

29. Tissue acorn

Using tissue or torn paper, craft an acorn and glue it to some construction paper. You can make these big or small!

30. Name leaf tree

Pick up some faux leaves from your craft store and spell your little one's name out with them and glue them onto a construction paper tree.

31. Felt apple pie

Take a small pie pan and line it with felt. Add colored pom-poms to make an “apple filling" and cut addition felt strips for the top. Encourage your little one to make a lattice on top of the pie with the felt strips. This craft is one that they can play with over and over again!



32. Potato leaf stamping

Cut the end of a potato in the shape of a leaf and let your little one stamp on a piece of paper.

33. Popsicle stick apple cores

Cut out the shape of the top and bottom of an apple, glue popsicle sticks in the middle for the core, add a few dots for seeds and glue a magnet on the back!

34. Cookie spiders

Snack crafts are always fun and these cookie spiders are yummy and so easy to make. Stick pretzel sticks into the sides of Oreos (to create spider legs) and add a few edible eye to the tops.

35. Edible bones

Add small marshmallows to the end of pretzel sticks and dip into some white chocolate. They will look like “bones" and be a perfect Halloween snack!

36. Candy corn hands

Paint your little ones hand to mimic a candy corn and press it down on a piece of paper. Hand-printing is always a hit with the little ones!

37. Pumpkin stamping

Cut a pumpkin up in various sizes and let your little ones use the pieces to stamp on construction paper.

38. Handprint scarecrow

Paint your little one's hand three different colors for the scarecrow face, shirt and pants. Stamp their hand down, let them add some hair and eyes and you've got a handprint scarecrow.

39. Popsicle stick spiders

Glue together four popsicle sticks, paint black and top with googly eyes!

40. Apple bird feeders

Cut an apple in half, core out a small hole with a spoon, top with birdseed and set outside. These are great for wildlife and 100% edible, which means no mess is left behind!



41. Paper plate scarecrows

Make a scarecrow out of paper plate, glue it to a popsicle stick and stick it in your flower beds!

42. Nature mural

Using all the sticks, leaves, acorns and other nature finds, glue them to a large poster board to create a nature collage. Then help your little one with identifying the different objects!

43. Hand-traced turkey

A great way to encourage fine motor skills and writing is by tracing. Encourage your little one to trace their hand on a piece of construction paper, cut it out and create a turkey out of it. All you need is a beak, feet and some wings!

44. Tissue tree

Similar to the above tissue paper crafts, make a tree using tissue paper for the trunk and leaves.

45. Owl rocks

Paint rocks to look like owls or other fall creatures.

46. Gratitude book

Print out pictures of your little one with family members, pets, etc, place them in a photo book and let them flip through the pages.

47. Franken feet

Instead of hand painting, paint your little one's foot green, place it on a piece of paper upside down, add some eyes, stitches and black hair.

48. Paper plate footballs

Cut paper plates into the shape of footballs, paint them and add some yarn for the laces. This is a perfect Sunday craft!

49. Tree bark coloring

This craft is a favorite of ours and such a fun thing to do outdoors. Wrap a large piece of paper around the base of a tree and let your little one color on it. The tree bark will come through making for a unique pattern and work of art!

50. Pumpkin cheerio tracing

Print off a picture of a pumpkin and let your little one trace the outline with cheerios or fruit loops!

Fall crafts are such a fun way to celebrate the season with little ones—and then for you to tuck away for cherishing in years to come.

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Learn + Play

It's on the walls of OB-GYN offices and maternity wards, and on the lips of friends, family and sometimes even strangers in the formula aisle. At times it's all a new mama can hear, even when she's sitting in silence with her thoughts.

When it comes to infant feeding, there is no phrase mothers hear more often than "breast is best" but new research, experts and moms who've lived a different truth say that while this message is amplified with the best intentions, new mamas need a lot more than those three words.

A recently published study, "The best of intentions: Prenatal breastfeeding intentions and infant health," suggests that there is a high societal cost to simplifying the cultural conversation around infant feeding into a three-word slogan.

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The study found that moms who intended to exclusively breastfeed but ended up using formula had children with health outcomes similar to exclusively breastfed infants. They also, in many cases, have a lot of undue guilt.

A mom's perspective

When Nicole Rivet-Barton welcomed her first child nearly four years ago she fully intended to breastfeed, but it was a struggle from the start.

"My expectation for myself was that my body would provide what it needed for my baby and when that didn't happen and I had to accept that and transition [to supplementing with formula] I felt like I was failing somehow," Rivet-Barton tells Motherly.

"I felt like less of a person," she explains, adding that whenever she had to have an encounter with a medical professional that wasn't her regular family doctor, she felt judged. On more than one occasion nurses chided her for bottle feeding, telling her "breast is best" without knowing those words were already never far from her thoughts.

"It wasn't the 'best' that I could give her. She was still hungry. My breast milk didn't have what she needed to grow properly," she says.

With the help of a breastfeeding support group and a lactation consultant, Rivet-Barton was eventually able to shift her mindset from "breast is best" to "you do you" and says she felt lighter for it.

"We went to a lactation consultant to help get my milk up and she basically said to me one day, 'You're going to pick your path and you're going to do what's right for your baby. Don't feel guilty.' And I guess I heard her that day, and I let it go," she recalls.

A lactation consultant who doesn't say "breast is best"

Leigh Anne O'Connor is an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant in private practice. She's not the lactation consultant Rivet-Barton turned to, but she certainly shares the same views when it comes to acknowledging that infant feeding can't be boiled down to three-word slogans.

"I've never embraced that phase, 'breast is best' or 'fed is best.' They're both divisive terms. It creates a division in parenting and it creates conflict," she says. In place of catchphrases, O'Connor advocates for a more nuanced, thoughtful conversation on the topic.

She believes we can have individual and cultural discussions that both normalize breastfeeding and encourage parents to get their baby fed in the way that works for them, whether it's through nursing, pumping, using donor milk or formula.

"It's complicated. It's not one size fits all," she says. "Breastfeeding isn't always all or nothing, and there's a place for supplementation."

When "you do you" is best

For Rivet-Barton, supplementing allowed her to keep breastfeeding as much as she could for six months after both of her daughters were born.

She says that by the time her second daughter came along, she felt more confident in her parenting choices, and gave herself a lot more grace when it came to her infant feeding choices.

"I got into my stride and got confident enough to listen to my gut and not other people," she tells Motherly, adding that she wishes medical professionals and society would use more than three words when trying to educate new parents about infant feeding. "Give them options without putting expectations on them," she suggests.

More research and more support needed

There is a massive body of research suggesting that breastfeeding is great for babies. That's not in dispute at all. But the researchers behind that recently published study suggest that the link just isn't as simple as "breast is best."

"Our results suggest that formula offers similar health benefits for our relatively advantaged sample of infants, once we take prenatal intentions into account," the study's authors note.

The research suggests that moms like Rivet-Barton really have nothing to feel guilty about.

The authors—Kerri M. Raissian, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Public Policy at the University of Connecticut and Jessica Su, an assistant professor in University at Buffalo Department of Sociology—explain that it's not actually the intention to breastfeed that makes the health difference, but rather the fact that mothers who intended to breastfeed often have a certain kind of privilege: They're the mothers who have more access to medical care and therefore more access to information about infant health.

Raissian and Su suggest that instead of amplifying the phrase "breast is best" and potentially overstating the benefits of breastfeeding, society would do better to give mothers the support they need during pregnancy and beyond.

This means making sure that everyone has access to perinatal care, and the kind of parental leave that makes it possible to breastfeed in the first place.

"The U.S. is the only developed country with no federal paid parental leave, and only about 12 percent of mothers in the private sector have access to paid leave," Su explains. "Paid maternity leave likely increases breastfeeding success, and also seems to have additional health benefits for mothers and infants. If we have concerns about disparities in infant health we need social policies that support these recommendations and also go beyond simply encouraging breastfeeding over formula."

Breastfeeding is great, but maybe "support for mothers" would be a better three-word slogan.

[This post was originally published October 19, 2018.]

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Back when my husband and I were creating our wedding registry, it was a fun, low-pressure opportunity to select some new dishes and linens. After all, I knew a thing or two about stocking my home and making the "wrong decision" with thread count was the only thing that posed any risk to my sleep at night.

Fast-forward a few years to when I created a baby registry before the birth of my first child—and I found the experience to have a much steeper learning curve. Unlike those sheets, it felt like a bad swaddle or bassinet selection would be catastrophic. Unsure of what to expect from motherhood or my baby, I leaned heavily on advice from friends who already ventured into parenthood. (Starting with their reminders to take deep breaths!)

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Now a mom of three little ones under the age of four, I'm happy to be in a position to pass along some baby registry wisdom.

Go shopping with a veteran parent

As first-time parents, my husband and I barely knew the difference between a bouncer and a swing, let alone what specific features we would want. So when a mom friend recommended we head to Walmart to build my registry together—because she found them to carry the trendy brands she loved AND make registering a breeze during her pregnancy—I leapt at the chance.

By walking through the aisles together and actually getting to see the products, I was much more confident in my registry selections. Thanks to that quick, in-store tutorial from my friend, I understood exactly how to match a perfect infant car seat with an extra base and stroller—which is something I would have been clueless about on my own.

Include items at a variety of price points

When it comes down to it, a registry is really a wish list. So, while I had a personal budget for a stroller if it had to come out of my own pocket, this was an opportunity for me to ask for the stroller of my dreams. And, wouldn't you know it? A few family members went in on it together, which made a bigger price tag much more manageable.

At the same time, it's nice to include some of the smaller ticket items that are absolutely essential. I can't even begin to tell you how grateful I was to skip buying my own diapers for those first few weeks. (With super cute patterns, these are also surprisingly fun to give, too!)

Think about the gifts you would like to give

The first time I bought a mom-to-be a gift after my own child was born, I knew immediately what to look for on her registry: a diaper bag backpack, which I had come to have very strong opinions about after battling falling straps with my first diaper bag. This allowed me to feel like I had a personal touch in my gift, even if I brought one pre-selected by her.

I also appreciate it when my friends clearly incorporate their style into their registry choices, like with adorable baby outfits or nursery decor—and there's no sweeter "thank you" than a picture from a friend showing your gift in use.

Ask for things to grow with your child

Even though it's called a "baby registry," there's no need to limit yourself to gifts used before the first birthday. (To this day, I still have people who attended my baby shower to thank for the convertible bed that my oldest child sleeps in!) Knowing that, I would have included more options with long lifespans into my registry.I'll also be honest: I'm jealous of people creating their baby registries today. Although it's just been a few years since I made mine, the options out there at big retailers and online are even better.

I'm just thankful I have such a cute selection when I'm perusing friends' registries—and that I could strongly suggest a "baby sprinkle" of my own if our family continues to grow.

Motherly is your daily #momlife manual; we are here to help you easily find the best, most beautiful products for your life that actually work. We share what we love—and we may receive a commission if you choose to buy. You've got this.


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