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Navigating childhood challenges can be stressful, and sometimes deep breathing isn’t the solution that works for your child. When your child is in need of tension relief, try one of these techniques:


1. Try an inversion.

For centuries, Yogis have understood the calming power of bringing the head below the level of the heart, otherwise known as inversion. Whether it’s relaxing in child’s pose, bending over to touch your toes, or practicing a headstand—inverting the body has a restorative effect on the autonomic nervous system, which controls the body’s response to stress.

2. Visualize a quiet place.

Research has shown that visualization is beneficial for a range of populations to reduce stress levels. Ask your child to close their eyes and picture a calm, peaceful place. Then, gently guide them to slowly start to build up a picture of how it looks, smells and feels to be there.

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3. Drink water.

Dehydration has been linked to a reduction in mental performance. Pour your child a tall class of cold water and have them sip it slowly. You can try this with them and observe the calming effect this has on your own nervous system.

4. Sing out loud.

Everyone knows the sweet relief associated with rocking out to your favorite tune. But the physical act of singing out loud, even if it is off key, has been shown to release endorphins—the “feel good” chemical in the brain.

5. Do the “Downward Facing Dog” pose.

Just like inversions help reset the autonomic nervous system, the yoga pose known as “Downward Facing Dog” in particular has the added benefit of activating several muscles in the arms, legs and core. This stretch helps muscles begin to burn additional blood glucose that is made available by the body’s fight or flight response.

6. Paint it out.

Not only does painting give the brain something to focus on other than the stressor, but participating in visual arts has been linked to resilience to stress in general. If the thought of dragging out the tempera gives you stress, have your child try “painting” with shaving cream on a plastic shower curtain in the yard. Not only is clean up a breeze, but your child will smell great when they are finished.

7. Jump rope.

Set a timer for 2 minutes, put on some music and challenge your child jump to the beat of the song. If your child isn’t able to jump rope, playing hop scotch is a great alternative.

8. Jump high.

Challenge your child to a jumping contest to see who can jump highest, longest, fastest, or slowest. This is another great way to get in some exercise to help your child blow off some steam.

9. Blow bubbles.

Just like blowing on a pinwheel, blowing bubbles can help your child gain control of their breathing and thus, their mental state. Bonus: Running around popping bubbles is just as fun as blowing them.

10. Take a hot bath.

After a long day at work, there is nothing more relaxing than laying in a bathtub of hot water with the lights turned down and no interruptions. The same holds true for kids. Use bath time as a chance to help your little one unwind from the activities of the day. Introduce a few simple bath toys and allow your child to relax as long as they need to.

11. Take a cold shower.

While the complete opposite of a hot bath, cold showers actually have a restorative effect on the body. Not only do cold or even cool showers reduce inflammation in the muscles, it improves heart flow back to the heart and leads to a boost in mood. One study on winter swimmers found that tension, fatigue, depression and negative moods all decreased with regular plunges into cold water.

12. Have a cozy drink.

There is a reason why many people herald September as the beginning of Pumpkin Spice Latte (PSL) season. Drinking a warm drink on a cool day makes your body feel warm, almost like a hug from the inside. Giving your child a warm hot chocolate or warmed milk with a splash of vanilla will elicit the same response you have over that first sip of your PSL.

13. Blow out a candle.

Light a candle for your child to blow out. Then re-light it and move it further and further away from them, so they have to take deeper and deeper breaths to blow it out. This is a great way to practice deep breathing, while making a game out of it.

14. Watch fish.

Have you ever wondered why there is always a fish tank in hospitals and medical centers? The University of Exeter in the UK did, and found that watching fish swim in an aquarium reduces blood pressure and heart rate. Better yet, the larger the fish tank, the greater the effect. The next time your child needs to calm down, take them to the local lake, hatchery, or aquarium for a little fish-watching therapy.

15. Count backwards from 100.

Not only does counting give your child a chance to focus on something other than what is bothering them, counting backwards offers an added concentration challenge without overwhelming their brain.

16. Repeat a mantra.

Create a mantra that you and your child can use to help them calm down. “I am calm” or “I am relaxed” work well, but feel free to get creative and make it something personal to you and your child.

17. Breathe into your belly.

Most of us breathe incorrectly, especially when we are in a stressful situation. Have your child think about their belly like it is a balloon. Tell them to breathe in deep to fill the balloon and breathe out to deflate it. Repeat this simple process 5 times and notice the effects.

18. Shake a glitter jar.

“Calm Down Jars” have been making their way around Pinterest for a while now, but the concept behind them is sound. Giving your child a focal point for 3-5 minutes that is not the stressor will allow their brain and body to reset itself. These jars can be made simply from sealed canning jars filled with colored water and glitter or with baby food jars filled with warm water and glitter glue.

19. Go for a run.

Running has been shown to reduce stress and can sometimes be more effective than a trip to the therapist’s office. Going for a 10 minute jog can not only affect your child’s mood immediately, its effects on their ability to cope with stress can last for several hours afterward.

20. Count to 5.

Just when it seems as though they “can’t take it anymore”, have your child close their eyes and count to five. This form of 5-second meditation offers the brain a chance to reset itself and be able to look at a situation from a different perspective. It also gives your child a chance to think before they act in a volatile situation.

21. Talk it out.

For children who are able to verbalize their feelings, talking about what is bothering them gives them a chance to let you know what is going on while processing it for themselves. The trick is to resist the urge to “fix” the problem. Your child needs you to listen and ask appropriate questions, not offer unsolicited advice.

22. Write a letter in the voice of your BFF.

We would never talk to our best friend in the same critical way we talk to ourselves. The same is true for our children. Tell them to be kind to themselves and ask them what they would tell a best friend to do in their situation.

23. Decorate a wall.

We’re not talking about paint and decor, but poster tack and pictures from magazines or printed from the internet can give your child a chance to create large-scale temporary art in any space. The creative process is what is important, not the end result.

24. Create a vision board.

Have your child cut out words and pictures from magazines that speak to their interests, desires and dreams. Then have them glue these pictures and words onto a poster board to display in their room. Not only does the process of creation allow them to think about what they want from life, displaying things they love gives them an opportunity to focus on what is really important when they are upset.

25. Give or get a bear hug.

Hugging allows your body to produce oxytocin, a naturally occurring hormone in your body necessary for immune system function. Not only does a 20 second hug reduce blood pressure, increase feelings of well-being, and reduce the harmful physical effects of stress, both you and your child will reap the benefits!

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26. Walk in nature.

According to Stanford scientists, walking in nature has been proven to improve cognition and reduce stress. Even if you do not have time to spend the 50 minutes researchers did, taking a 15 minute walk in nature works can be just what your child needs.

27. Envision your best self.

This is a great way to motivate your child to work toward a goal. Have them write down where they would like to see themselves in a week, a month, or a year, with this specific goal in mind.

28. Blow on a pinwheel.

Similar to the candle exercise, blowing on a pinwheel focuses more on controlled exhalation rather than deep inhalation. Tell your child to make the pinwheel go slow, then fast, then slow to show them how they can vary the rate at which they blow out the air in their lungs.

29. Squish some putty.

When a child plays with putty, the brain’s electrical impulses begin firing away from the areas associated with stress. Try a store bought putty or make your own.

30. Take up pottery.

Much in the way playing with putty fires electrical impulses in your child’s brain, sculpting with clay or throwing pots can have a similar effect. It also has the added benefit of being considered “active learning,” a powerful condition that allows your child to learn through exploration.

31. Write it out.

For older children, journaling, or writing their feelings down can have a profound effect on their mood, especially if they can do so without the fear of having it read. Give your child a notebook to keep in a safe place and allow them to write about how they feel, assuring them you will not read it unless they ask you to.

32. Gratitude, gratitude, gratitude.

A cousin to “write it out,” gratitude journaling has been linked to better performance in the classroom as well as a reduction of stress outside of learning environments. Having a separate notebook only for things your child is grateful for will give them the freedom to keep their journaling activities separate.

33. Name your emotion.

Often when children become overwhelmed, it is because they have difficulty identifying the negative thoughts they are having. Whether your child is quick to anger, panic, or obsess to ensure things are perfect, ask them to give this feeling a name and help them talk back to it. For instance, by asking your child, “is Mr. Perfect bothering you again?” you can work together to help them challenge their perfectionism, rather than fight them over it.

34. Rock in a rocking chair.

Not only does rocking in a rocking chair provide non-weight bearing strengthening to the knees and core, its repetitive nature offers stress-relief as well. Rock in a rocking chair with your child or allow them to rock by themselves as a way to self-soothe their frenzied emotions.

35. Push against a wall.

This trick is perfect for allowing the body to get rid of stress hormones without having to go outside or even leave the room. Have your child try to push the wall over for 10 seconds, 3 times. This process allows the muscles to contract in a futile attempt to bring the wall down, then relax, releasing feel-good hormones into the body.

36. Crinkle tissue paper.

Babies are inherently aware of this trick as one of their favorite things to do is crinkle paper. Not only does crinkling tissue paper provide a satisfying noise, the textural changes in your child’s hand sends sensory feedback to the brain in a pathway away from those associated with stress.

37. Pop bubble wrap.

Anyone who has received a package in the mail knows the joy of popping row after row of bubble wrap. The same material can be found at most retailers and dollar stores and be cut into manageable pieces for stress-relief anywhere, anytime.

38. Roll a tennis ball on your back.

An old physical therapy trick, rolling a tennis ball on your child’s back will give them a gentle massage when they are most in need of a calming touch. Focus on the shoulders, neck, and lower back as these are typical places where the body holds tension.

39. Roll a golf ball under your feet.

Rolling a golf ball under your child’s feet can not only improve circulation, but there are pressure points on the bottom of the feet that relieve stress and relax the muscles of the feet and legs. Roll over the entire sole of your child’s foot using various pressures for maximum benefit.

40. Go to your calm down space.

Having a designated “Calm Down Space” in your home gives children an opportunity to retreat when they feel out of control and rejoin the group when they need to. It is important to make this space comfortable so your child wants to visit it when they are in need of a self-imposed “time out”.

41. Play music.

Music has a profound effect on mood, sleep, stress, and anxiety. Use a variety of musical styles to set the tone in your home, car, or your child’s room.

42. Have a dance party.

Adding a physical component to your musical enjoyment gets your kids moving and is a fun way to be active. Crank up the tunes and have a dance party in your living room when your child is in a bad mood and watch their mood transform.

43. Do a primal yell.

Sometimes all of your child’s emotions are simply too much to contain in their body. Have them stand with their feet shoulder width apart and imagine their feelings boiling up from their toes through their legs and body, and out of their mouths. They don’t have to yell words, or even maintain a certain pitch—just whatever comes out that feels good to them.

44. Change the scenery.

How many times have we thought to ourselves, “Just walk away,” when confronted by a big emotion? Your child may simply need a change of scenery in order to calm down. If you are inside, head out. If you are outside, find a quiet space indoors. Either way, change the scenery and you will likely change the mood.

45. Go for a walk.

There’s a real reason people go for walks to clear their heads. Not only is the fresh air and exercise restorative, but the natural rhythm walking creates has a self-soothing quality. Take your child on a walk and they may even open up to your about what is on their mind.

46. Plan a fun activity.

When you are in an anxious moment, it can seem as though the walls are closing in and the world will come to an end. Some children need to focus on what is ahead of them in order to reset their internal dialog. Plan something fun to do as a family, and let your child have a say in it. Any topic that will get them focused on a future something to look forward to can be helpful.

47. Knead the bread.

Grandmothers around the world will tell you that the process of bread making is a tremendous stress relief. Simple recipes are abundant online that allow your child to get their hands dirty turning and pushing dough. The best part is that at the end, you have homemade bread to show for it!

48. Make a bracelet.

Crafting in general can facilitate a state of “flow” or a state characterized by complete absorption in an activity. The same concept can be extended to knitting, crochet, folding laundry, or any activity where your child forgets their external surroundings.

49. Get on a bike.

Bicycling for children has largely become a thing of the past. With the introduction of bicycle lanes and paved trails in urban areas, bicycling is safer than ever and can be a powerful form of self-soothing. Not only is it easy on the joints, it promotes balance, exercise and can be done with the whole family.

50. Take a coloring break.

It’s not without good reason that restaurants give children coloring—it gives them something to focus on and can be a great mindfulness activity that reduces anxiety. Make a trip with your child to pick up some crayons and markers and get them excited about filling in the pages of a coloring book.


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As sweet as it may be to cuddle, cradle, or carry your baby all day, at some point you — and your arms — need a break. Naptime offers a brief respite, but what happens when you have more to do than can be accomplished during baby's afternoon snooze?

During Best of Baby Month, Walmart.com is offering big online savings on must-have multitasking products (think exersaucers and activity centers) that allow you to keep an eye on baby while still tackling things like housekeeping, work, or that best-seller you just borrowed from the library. Your little one will be happily occupied (just not, you know, unattended) and you'll be relieved to have the use of your arms again.

Ready to save money and a bit of sanity, mama? Check out these items and more online now through September 30.

Fisher-Price 4-in-1 Step N'Play Piano

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Your little musician will stay busy exploring more than 20 stimulating activities with lights and sounds, including drums, music note sliders, a tambourine, a microphone rattle, and more. They can even play the keyboard with their feet; the soft interactive play mat makes noise, too. Hearing baby entertain themself while you get to multitask will be music to your ears!

Price: $79 (regularly $90)

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Fisher-Price Infant-to-Toddler Rocker

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Guns 'N Roses got it right when they sang, "Welcome to the jungle, we've got fun and games!" This colorful jungle-themed rocker will entertain baby with overhead toys that spin and clack. When they're tired of rocking (out), there's a kickstand to hold it in place and calming vibrations to soothe.

Price: 29.98 (regularly $37.87)

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Evenflo Exersaucer Bounce and Learn Sweet Tea Party

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Baby can rock, bounce, spin, and reach in this sweetly designed exersaucer. While you're preparing dinner or scarfing down lunch, your little one can be enjoying their own tea party, complete with stacking cakes, a fun flip book, a self-discovery mirror, and other fine motor activities. Toss the removable seat cover in the washing machine when it needs cleaning because messes are inevitable in the kitchen.

Price: $44 (regularly $59)

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Graco Blossom 6-in-1 Convertible High Chair

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Kitchen tables aren't just for eating—and neither are high chairs! Let your little one keep you company in the kitchen in this adjustable high chair that converts into six different seating options ranging from an infant high chair to a youth seat. Safely secured with your choice of either a 3- or 5-point harness, they can play with toys on the dishwasher safe tray while you get things done.

Price: $112.49 (regularly $134.99)

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Graco DuetSoothe Baby Swing and Rocker

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When baby's acting fussy, give your arms a rest and let this cozy infant swing rock them 'til they're calm. You can even customize it based on your little one's preferences; the music-playing swing can move side-to-side or front-to-back. Plus, there's a plush mobile and mirrored dome to help distract them from whatever was causing that irritability in the first place.

Price: $98.99 (regularly $169.99)

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This article was sponsored by Walmart. Thank you for supporting the brands that support Motherly and mamas.

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[Content warning: This article references maternal suicide.]

Before she gave birth to her daughter, Dr. Stephanie Liu, a Clinical Lecturer with the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Alberta, expected she would breastfeed, but after extolling the benefits of breastfeeding to her patients for years, nursing did not come easily for Liu—but the guilt did.

"I struggled to get her to latch and when she did latch it was very painful. As a result, my milk supply was insufficient. For the first two weeks, I supplemented with formula and was racked with guilt that I was not doing the best for Madi," she writes for The Conversation

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She is hardly alone in this. A recent commentary in the journal Nursing for Women's Health explains that "[p]sychological pressure to exclusively breastfeed has the potential to contribute to postpartum depression symptoms in new mothers who are unable to achieve their breastfeeding intentions."

Liu points out that a large 2011 study found mothers who had negative breastfeeding experiences were more likely to have symptoms of depression. On a personal level, she understands why.

"Breastfeeding was one of the things I looked forward to most when I was pregnant. In medical school I learned about the bond between mothers and babies when they are breastfeeding. I could not wait to experience this," Liu explains, adding that breastfeeding her daughter Madi turned out to be way more challenging than she had anticipated.

For Liu, this experience changed the way she practices medicine, and she hopes that in sharing it she may change the way other medical professionals counsel their patients.

"As a family doctor, I know that breast milk is the optimal feeding choice for health benefits, but as a mom, I know the extreme pressures that we are placed under as women to produce milk every time our baby needs it," she says.

The extreme pressure to breastfeed

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends mothers exclusively breastfeed their babies for the first six months of life, but ACOG also officially recognizes that a baby's mother "is uniquely qualified to decide whether exclusive breastfeeding, mixed feeding or formula feeding is optimal for her and her infant."

Unfortunately, many moms don't feel that they have a choice. They just want to do what is "best" for their baby, and when they can't they feel like failures.

Mom Jen Harper was convinced that breastfeeding was the way to go, and felt devastated (and exhausted) when no matter what she tried, it just didn't work for her and her son. "I'd been conditioned to think that since I was a woman, breastfeeding would be the most natural thing I've ever done," Harper writes.

She finally found relief when an ear, nose and throat specialist told her that not every baby is a fit for every breast.

"I had to give up the notion that this was, in fact, a failure, because it wasn't. I had to let go of my notion that everyone around me was judging me for pulling out a bottle and powder instead of delicately unclipping my cute nursing bra," she explains.

Harper came to terms with the fact that supplementing with formula was better for her son than having "a sobbing mommy."

But research shows a lot of moms are sobbing over this issue and don't get the advice Harper did.

"Breast is best" was a super successful public health campaign, but it has created a maternal mental health crisis. A growing number of new moms are dying by suicide, and some of the fathers left to raise babies as single dads are speaking out about the role the extreme pressure to breastfeed can play in fatal cases of postpartum depression.

Vancouver father Kim Chen lost his wife Florence Leung in 2016 shortly after they became parents. Their dreams were coming true, but Leung was under so much pressure and died by suicide.

"I still remember reading a handout upon Flo's discharge from hospital with the line 'Breast Milk Should Be the Exclusive Food For the Baby for the First Six Months.' I also remember posters on the maternity unit 'Breast is Best.' While agreeing to the benefits of breast milk, there NEED[s] to be an understanding that it is okay to supplement with formula, and that formula is a completely viable option," Chen wrote in a Facebook post after his wife's death.

Their son thrived on formula after his mother died. He was in the 90th percentile.

Support is best

According to Suzanne Barston, the author of Bottled Up: How the Way We Feed Babies Has Come to Define Motherhood, and Why It Shouldn't, it's time for those who support mothers—physicians like Liu, but also midwives, doulas, and those leading mom and baby support groups—to offer "solid, sensitive, personalized advice" to all mothers.

It's been over a decade since Barston launched her blog, The Fearless Formula Feeder and witnessed the evolution of online discussion of infant feeding go from "breast is breast" to "fed is best", but she says the conversation really needs to be a lot more nuanced than three word catch-phrases.

In 2018 she spoke to Motherly about why moms who use formula often feel unsupported in our society, and noted that while there has been a big shift in the last decade in terms of how people speak to and about moms who choose to supplement with formula, the choice to not breastfeed altogether is still not seen as a legitimate choice.

Moms feel like society doesn't support them overall, but when it comes to infant feeding, moms feel very unsupported. Moms are told they must do everything possible to succeed at breastfeeding, but that's extremely difficult in a society where many parents must go back to work when their infants are mere weeks old.

Yes, breastfeeding rates in America are lower than the World Health Organization would like, but this isn't because moms aren't educated about the benefits of breastfeeding. There are few among us who don't know the benefits of breastfeeding. In many cases, moms would like to breastfeed but can't because they don't have the support system to actually make it work.

"Whether you're feeling physically uncomfortable from your birth or you have to make dinner for your two other kids or you have to go back to work in three weeks, those are all very real issues that women have to deal with and no amount of awareness or education about breastfeeding changes," Barston told Motherly.

How to help mothers

Like Barston, Liu harnessed the power of the internet after her own infant feeding journey, and now supports other mothers in theirs through her blog, her blog Life of Dr. Mom.

It took having her own postpartum experience for Liu to learn that breast isn't always best, and she's changed the way she supports new mothers as a medical practitioner. There's just so much more nuance to this than "breast is best." You can't fit her thoughts as neatly on a poster, but her words are worthy of maternity ward walls and pamphlets and could save the lives.

"I always support the idea to breastfeed if you can, to reach out for support, and if you are struggling, there are other safe and healthy options to ensure your baby is well fed," she explains.

If you are struggling with postpartum depression, here are the resources you need.

If you are feeding your baby formula, breast milk or both, know that we support you and that you are a good mother.

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Fall is officially here! And whether you're excited about it or not, it's the perfect time to introduce little ones to fall crafts.

Fall DIY crafts are especially fun to do during that tricky gap between errands and dinner. It's not easy, but I try to do a couple of weekly crafts with my kids during this time. Lately, we've been inspired by the changing leaves and dropping temperatures, which we're channeling into some pretty cool artwork. If you're looking for fun fall activities, we've got you covered.

Here are 50 fall-themed crafts that are perfect for doing with little kids:

1. Fingerprint trees

With stamp ink or paint, make leaves on drawn-out trees using your fingerprints. These are fun, easy to make and easy to clean up!

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2. Popcorn music makers

Save those old tissue paper rolls, tape the ends with wax paper and fill them with popcorn kernels. Let your little ones decorate the outside and create some music!

3. Apple painting

Slice apples in half, paint and use them to stamp on paper. That makes for a fun afternoon—and good use of those excess apples.

4. Leaf art

There are so many different things you can do with leaves, but one of my favorite is to just create simple fun pictures with them. You can make animals out of them, trace around them or create a cool collage. The options are endless!

5. Leaf people

Take googly eyes, leaves, toothpicks, glue and construction paper and you can create one fun leaf dude!

6. Paper plate pumpkins

Paint paper plates orange, add a green construction paper stem and a brown pipe cleaner for a squiggly vine. Then let your toddler get creative with some finger paint for the face!

7. Fall wreaths

Using the leaves your little one collected this fall season, craft a fun leaf wreath for the backdoor.


8. Acorn handprints

Using two different shades of brown paint, paint the top of you little one's hand with the darker shade and the bottom with the lighter shade. Press their hand down on a piece of construction paper and you've got an acorn!

9. Pumpkin painting

Spread some newspaper out on the table or floor, grab a few pumpkins and paint the day away.

10. Cheerios on the cob

Cut out a few pieces of paper shaped like corn cobs and let your little one glue on some cheerios to make kernels.

11. Sucker ghouls

Wrap tootsie pops or dumdums with coffee filters, tie the underneath portion with a small piece of string and take a black marker to make two eyes. You've got cute little ghouls with something sweet underneath!

12. Scarecrow puppets

Using paper bags and some construction paper, make scarecrow puppets. These are fun to make—and play with!

13. Q-tip skeletons

Help your little one craft a skeleton with Q-tips glued to black paper.

14. Tissue pie slice

Cut up some pieces of tissue paper and a slice of construction paper. Then let your little one glue away! Try orange paper for pumpkin pie, brown for pecans and green for apples.

15. Thankful tree

Draw a tree on a piece of paper and write the things that your little one is thankful for on smaller pieces of paper. Let me glue those pieces to their tree and continue to go over the things they are thankful for and why they are thankful for those things.

16. Pumpkin rocks

Paint rocks with orange and black to create pumpkins and jack-o-lanterns. Hide a few around town if you are feeling up to it!

17. Paper plate bat

Paint or color paper plates and coffee filters black. Glue the coffee filters to the sides of the paper plate to mimic wings. Add some fun eyes, sharp teeth and a piece of string at the top and hang these from the ceiling.

18. Gauze mummies

Grab some gauze out of the first aid kit that's tucked away in the closet, cut it up and let your little one make some funny gauze mummies. Add a set of googly eyes to the mummy when done.

19. Paper plate owls

Using paper plates, muffin tin liners and brown paper bag trimmings, make an owl to hang on the refrigerator.

20. Leaf mobiles

Tie some fallen leaves from the backyard to some fishing wire and hang them on an embroidery hoop. You can hang these in their room or even outside for some fun, seasonal decor!


21. Apple suncatchers

Cut the an outline of an apple and stick it to contact paper. Then cut out small pieces of tissue paper, fill the inner apple with those pieces, top with addition contact paper, cut out and hang it on your window. When the sun sets in the evening, it will catch the apple just right and beam a ray of fun colors throughout your house.

22. Bubble wrap corn

Save that bubble wrap that comes in your weekly Amazon shipment, cut it out in the shape of a piece of corn, paint it and let dry.

23. Tissue paper bird feeder

Empty tissue paper rolls make great bird feeders. Let your little one smear peanut butter on them, roll them in birdseed, string them and hang them outside.

24. Tissue candy corn

To recreate this yummy snack, use yellow, orange and white tissue paper to create the shape of candy corn.

25. Puffy cotton ball ghosts

For this fun activity, all you need are cotton balls, black construction paper and some googly eyes. These are super cute and fun to touch!

26. Paper plate spider webs

Using a hole puncher, cut holes around the outside of a paper plate and let your little one string yarn throughout the holes. This little craft is great for those fine motor skills!

27. Clothes pin bats

Paint coffee filters and clothespins black, clip them together and string them with some fishing wire. These make for great pieces of Halloween decor!

28. Corn painting

Use a few ears of corn to paint with. The patterns are fun and who doesn't love to paint with food!

29. Tissue acorn

Using tissue or torn paper, craft an acorn and glue it to some construction paper. You can make these big or small!

30. Name leaf tree

Pick up some faux leaves from your craft store and spell your little one's name out with them and glue them onto a construction paper tree.

31. Felt apple pie

Take a small pie pan and line it with felt. Add colored pom-poms to make an “apple filling" and cut addition felt strips for the top. Encourage your little one to make a lattice on top of the pie with the felt strips. This craft is one that they can play with over and over again!



32. Potato leaf stamping

Cut the end of a potato in the shape of a leaf and let your little one stamp on a piece of paper.

33. Popsicle stick apple cores

Cut out the shape of the top and bottom of an apple, glue popsicle sticks in the middle for the core, add a few dots for seeds and glue a magnet on the back!

34. Cookie spiders

Snack crafts are always fun and these cookie spiders are yummy and so easy to make. Stick pretzel sticks into the sides of Oreos (to create spider legs) and add a few edible eye to the tops.

35. Edible bones

Add small marshmallows to the end of pretzel sticks and dip into some white chocolate. They will look like “bones" and be a perfect Halloween snack!

36. Candy corn hands

Paint your little ones hand to mimic a candy corn and press it down on a piece of paper. Hand-printing is always a hit with the little ones!

37. Pumpkin stamping

Cut a pumpkin up in various sizes and let your little ones use the pieces to stamp on construction paper.

38. Handprint scarecrow

Paint your little one's hand three different colors for the scarecrow face, shirt and pants. Stamp their hand down, let them add some hair and eyes and you've got a handprint scarecrow.

39. Popsicle stick spiders

Glue together four popsicle sticks, paint black and top with googly eyes!

40. Apple bird feeders

Cut an apple in half, core out a small hole with a spoon, top with birdseed and set outside. These are great for wildlife and 100% edible, which means no mess is left behind!



41. Paper plate scarecrows

Make a scarecrow out of paper plate, glue it to a popsicle stick and stick it in your flower beds!

42. Nature mural

Using all the sticks, leaves, acorns and other nature finds, glue them to a large poster board to create a nature collage. Then help your little one with identifying the different objects!

43. Hand-traced turkey

A great way to encourage fine motor skills and writing is by tracing. Encourage your little one to trace their hand on a piece of construction paper, cut it out and create a turkey out of it. All you need is a beak, feet and some wings!

44. Tissue tree

Similar to the above tissue paper crafts, make a tree using tissue paper for the trunk and leaves.

45. Owl rocks

Paint rocks to look like owls or other fall creatures.

46. Gratitude book

Print out pictures of your little one with family members, pets, etc, place them in a photo book and let them flip through the pages.

47. Franken feet

Instead of hand painting, paint your little one's foot green, place it on a piece of paper upside down, add some eyes, stitches and black hair.

48. Paper plate footballs

Cut paper plates into the shape of footballs, paint them and add some yarn for the laces. This is a perfect Sunday craft!

49. Tree bark coloring

This craft is a favorite of ours and such a fun thing to do outdoors. Wrap a large piece of paper around the base of a tree and let your little one color on it. The tree bark will come through making for a unique pattern and work of art!

50. Pumpkin cheerio tracing

Print off a picture of a pumpkin and let your little one trace the outline with cheerios or fruit loops!

Fall crafts are such a fun way to celebrate the season with little ones—and then for you to tuck away for cherishing in years to come.

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Learn + Play

It's on the walls of OB-GYN offices and maternity wards, and on the lips of friends, family and sometimes even strangers in the formula aisle. At times it's all a new mama can hear, even when she's sitting in silence with her thoughts.

When it comes to infant feeding, there is no phrase mothers hear more often than "breast is best" but new research, experts and moms who've lived a different truth say that while this message is amplified with the best intentions, new mamas need a lot more than those three words.

A recently published study, "The best of intentions: Prenatal breastfeeding intentions and infant health," suggests that there is a high societal cost to simplifying the cultural conversation around infant feeding into a three-word slogan.

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The study found that moms who intended to exclusively breastfeed but ended up using formula had children with health outcomes similar to exclusively breastfed infants. They also, in many cases, have a lot of undue guilt.

A mom's perspective

When Nicole Rivet-Barton welcomed her first child nearly four years ago she fully intended to breastfeed, but it was a struggle from the start.

"My expectation for myself was that my body would provide what it needed for my baby and when that didn't happen and I had to accept that and transition [to supplementing with formula] I felt like I was failing somehow," Rivet-Barton tells Motherly.

"I felt like less of a person," she explains, adding that whenever she had to have an encounter with a medical professional that wasn't her regular family doctor, she felt judged. On more than one occasion nurses chided her for bottle feeding, telling her "breast is best" without knowing those words were already never far from her thoughts.

"It wasn't the 'best' that I could give her. She was still hungry. My breast milk didn't have what she needed to grow properly," she says.

With the help of a breastfeeding support group and a lactation consultant, Rivet-Barton was eventually able to shift her mindset from "breast is best" to "you do you" and says she felt lighter for it.

"We went to a lactation consultant to help get my milk up and she basically said to me one day, 'You're going to pick your path and you're going to do what's right for your baby. Don't feel guilty.' And I guess I heard her that day, and I let it go," she recalls.

A lactation consultant who doesn't say "breast is best"

Leigh Anne O'Connor is an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant in private practice. She's not the lactation consultant Rivet-Barton turned to, but she certainly shares the same views when it comes to acknowledging that infant feeding can't be boiled down to three-word slogans.

"I've never embraced that phase, 'breast is best' or 'fed is best.' They're both divisive terms. It creates a division in parenting and it creates conflict," she says. In place of catchphrases, O'Connor advocates for a more nuanced, thoughtful conversation on the topic.

She believes we can have individual and cultural discussions that both normalize breastfeeding and encourage parents to get their baby fed in the way that works for them, whether it's through nursing, pumping, using donor milk or formula.

"It's complicated. It's not one size fits all," she says. "Breastfeeding isn't always all or nothing, and there's a place for supplementation."

When "you do you" is best

For Rivet-Barton, supplementing allowed her to keep breastfeeding as much as she could for six months after both of her daughters were born.

She says that by the time her second daughter came along, she felt more confident in her parenting choices, and gave herself a lot more grace when it came to her infant feeding choices.

"I got into my stride and got confident enough to listen to my gut and not other people," she tells Motherly, adding that she wishes medical professionals and society would use more than three words when trying to educate new parents about infant feeding. "Give them options without putting expectations on them," she suggests.

More research and more support needed

There is a massive body of research suggesting that breastfeeding is great for babies. That's not in dispute at all. But the researchers behind that recently published study suggest that the link just isn't as simple as "breast is best."

"Our results suggest that formula offers similar health benefits for our relatively advantaged sample of infants, once we take prenatal intentions into account," the study's authors note.

The research suggests that moms like Rivet-Barton really have nothing to feel guilty about.

The authors—Kerri M. Raissian, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Public Policy at the University of Connecticut and Jessica Su, an assistant professor in University at Buffalo Department of Sociology—explain that it's not actually the intention to breastfeed that makes the health difference, but rather the fact that mothers who intended to breastfeed often have a certain kind of privilege: They're the mothers who have more access to medical care and therefore more access to information about infant health.

Raissian and Su suggest that instead of amplifying the phrase "breast is best" and potentially overstating the benefits of breastfeeding, society would do better to give mothers the support they need during pregnancy and beyond.

This means making sure that everyone has access to perinatal care, and the kind of parental leave that makes it possible to breastfeed in the first place.

"The U.S. is the only developed country with no federal paid parental leave, and only about 12 percent of mothers in the private sector have access to paid leave," Su explains. "Paid maternity leave likely increases breastfeeding success, and also seems to have additional health benefits for mothers and infants. If we have concerns about disparities in infant health we need social policies that support these recommendations and also go beyond simply encouraging breastfeeding over formula."

Breastfeeding is great, but maybe "support for mothers" would be a better three-word slogan.

[This post was originally published October 19, 2018.]

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News

Back when my husband and I were creating our wedding registry, it was a fun, low-pressure opportunity to select some new dishes and linens. After all, I knew a thing or two about stocking my home and making the "wrong decision" with thread count was the only thing that posed any risk to my sleep at night.

Fast-forward a few years to when I created a baby registry before the birth of my first child—and I found the experience to have a much steeper learning curve. Unlike those sheets, it felt like a bad swaddle or bassinet selection would be catastrophic. Unsure of what to expect from motherhood or my baby, I leaned heavily on advice from friends who already ventured into parenthood. (Starting with their reminders to take deep breaths!)

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Now a mom of three little ones under the age of four, I'm happy to be in a position to pass along some baby registry wisdom.

Go shopping with a veteran parent

As first-time parents, my husband and I barely knew the difference between a bouncer and a swing, let alone what specific features we would want. So when a mom friend recommended we head to Walmart to build my registry together—because she found them to carry the trendy brands she loved AND make registering a breeze during her pregnancy—I leapt at the chance.

By walking through the aisles together and actually getting to see the products, I was much more confident in my registry selections. Thanks to that quick, in-store tutorial from my friend, I understood exactly how to match a perfect infant car seat with an extra base and stroller—which is something I would have been clueless about on my own.

Include items at a variety of price points

When it comes down to it, a registry is really a wish list. So, while I had a personal budget for a stroller if it had to come out of my own pocket, this was an opportunity for me to ask for the stroller of my dreams. And, wouldn't you know it? A few family members went in on it together, which made a bigger price tag much more manageable.

At the same time, it's nice to include some of the smaller ticket items that are absolutely essential. I can't even begin to tell you how grateful I was to skip buying my own diapers for those first few weeks. (With super cute patterns, these are also surprisingly fun to give, too!)

Think about the gifts you would like to give

The first time I bought a mom-to-be a gift after my own child was born, I knew immediately what to look for on her registry: a diaper bag backpack, which I had come to have very strong opinions about after battling falling straps with my first diaper bag. This allowed me to feel like I had a personal touch in my gift, even if I brought one pre-selected by her.

I also appreciate it when my friends clearly incorporate their style into their registry choices, like with adorable baby outfits or nursery decor—and there's no sweeter "thank you" than a picture from a friend showing your gift in use.

Ask for things to grow with your child

Even though it's called a "baby registry," there's no need to limit yourself to gifts used before the first birthday. (To this day, I still have people who attended my baby shower to thank for the convertible bed that my oldest child sleeps in!) Knowing that, I would have included more options with long lifespans into my registry.I'll also be honest: I'm jealous of people creating their baby registries today. Although it's just been a few years since I made mine, the options out there at big retailers and online are even better.

I'm just thankful I have such a cute selection when I'm perusing friends' registries—and that I could strongly suggest a "baby sprinkle" of my own if our family continues to grow.

Motherly is your daily #momlife manual; we are here to help you easily find the best, most beautiful products for your life that actually work. We share what we love—and we may receive a commission if you choose to buy. You've got this.


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