A modern lifestyle brand redefining motherhood

Positive parenting: 5 ways to have a smoother morning with your kids

Even if you’re a morning person, getting out of the house with little ones might make you wish you could just go back to bed—or at least figure out how to wake up on the right side of it. As hard as a natural smile may be when the kids aren’t cooperating and the coffee is cold before you get the chance to drink it, instituting some positive parenting practices first thing in the morning is an investment that will pay off throughout the day.


“These tips aren't just good for the morning, but fill your child's cup so they're feeling confident and loved to deal with whatever the day brings,” says Kate Orson, a Hand-in-Hand instructor and author of Tears Heal: How to Listen to Our Children.

Here’s how to help the whole family rise and shine:

1. Start prepping the night before

“Plan as much as you can the night before,” suggests author and parenting expert Julia Cook. “The more you do the night before, the more predictable the morning can be and the less rushed you feel.”

Cook suggests incorporating one thing into the nighttime routine that is all about creating a special, positive experience for the morning—like preparing a special breakfast or putting the next day’s outfit into the dryer so that it will feel like a warm hug when it’s time to get dressed.

2. Wake up first

If your wake-up call currently comes in the form of a baby or toddler, licensed mental health counselor Dr. Jaime Kulaga suggests setting an alarm for a bit earlier—hard as it may initially seem.

Kulaga says this time not only allows you to center your mind or use the bathroom in peace, but will also help you return the favor of a pleasant wake-up with your little ones: When you go into their room, do something that wakes them up gently, such as giving them a little back rub or singing a soft song.

3. Take a few moments to connect

For some kids, every side of the bed is the wrong side to wake up on. If your little one is not a morning person, they might need an extra dose of positivity upon waking. One technique Orson likes is what she calls “giggle parenting.”

To do this in the morning, set a timer for 10 or so minutes and spend that time dancing to some fun music, connecting and—hopefully—laughing.

“Children are often reluctant to get ready in the mornings because they know there's an impending separation from you,” Orson says. “Play and connection help fill a child's cup, so they are ready to face the day.”

If the struggles continue even after your kiddo has climbed out of bed, get giggly again. “If a child won't brush teeth, put on clothes or eat breakfast, use giggles to connect and gain their cooperation. Put clothes on the wrong body parts, brush their ears and hair instead of teeth,” says Orson, who explains this often helps children forget why they were refusing in the first place.

A post shared by Motherly (@mother.ly) on

4. Lavish praise

“Each morning, make sure that you say one positive thing to your child,” suggests Kulaga. “Tell them what they did well during the morning routine, what you were proud of the day before or even something that brings awareness like, ‘You look like you are carrying some extra confidence today for that quiz.’”

And, while you’re at it, remember to praise yourself too: Positive parenting author Kathy Walsh suggests taking time to feel grateful for the person who makes mornings happen in your house—you!

“Make a list of things you like about yourself. Look in the mirror for a full minute and say them out loud,” Walsh says, adding that it may not feel natural, but does help parents channel authentic positivity. And that’s contagious among the other members of the family.

5. Add some music

Parent trainer Katherine Firestone of the Fireborn Institute suggests turning up some uplifting music before you get out the door. Building the playlist may also be a fun activity to do together; just aim to have songs that get increasingly energizing as the morning goes on.

“Towards the end, the music gets faster and your child realizes that it’s time to be gathering materials to leave the house,” she says of the ideal playlist. “The final song is very energetic and means ‘drop everything you are doing and run to the car now.’”

In fact, you should use the same playlist: "Your child will start to develop some time management habits realizing that, based on the song playing, she is behind or ahead of schedule. She can then adjust her pace accordingly. This gives your child autonomy, which is great for having happier, smoother mornings and families.”

“As the playlist is used habitually, your child will start to develop some time management habits, realizing that, based on the song playing, if she is behind or ahead of schedule. She can then adjust her pace accordingly. This gives your child autonomy, which is great for having happier, smoother mornings and families.”

With the right planning (and playlist) every morning can be a positive morning—even Mondays!

Who said motherhood doesn't come with a manual?

Subscribe to get inspiration and super helpful ideas to rock your #momlife. Motherhood looks amazing on you.

Already a subscriber? Log in here.

My favorite part of every weekday is when I get home from work. As soon as I walk in the door, I hear a tiny voice scream, "Mommy, you're home!" Then my 3-year-old gives me the most amazing hug. Then a kiss. Then she grabs my hand and shows me whatever project she did in school. I always say, "I missed you today."

It's so different from my childhood.

My single Korean mother didn't get home from work until after 6 pm, so by the time she walked in the door, I was either doing homework in my room or out playing. If I was home, I'd yell a "Hi Mom!" and she would go into the kitchen to cook dinner. I knew she was tired, so I never bothered her. She rarely said a word.

I love being a mom, but it's profoundly difficult for me. I had to learn it was okay to openly express affection with my daughter. I have never felt like I deserve the overwhelming love she has for me, because I wasn't raised that way.

I love that my mother showed me how to be independent and instilled in me the value of hard work. But she was so focused on being strong that I often felt neglected. I just wanted to be loved by her.

Now that I'm a mother, I often think about how I'll raise my daughter differently than my mother raised me. It's not because I think she was a bad parent. I respect her more than anyone else in the world. I just want to make sure my daughter always feels loved.

1. I want my daughter to know it's okay to say, "I love you."

I don't ever remember my mother saying, "I love you" without me saying it first. I would hear the phrase in my friends' homes in daily conversation, and I thought it was strange.

In Jody Phan's 2016 article "Different Ways Asian Parents Show Their Love," she said her Asian parents never said it to her either. Soon, it became part of who she was, and it wasn't unnatural to not hear it.

I can say the same for me.

I tell my daughter I love her every day. Maybe it's selfish of me because I'm making up for lost "I love you's" my mother never gave me, but I like to think it makes her feel special.

2. I want my daughter to know it's okay to give hugs if she wants to.

The first time I met my best friend's family, everyone gave me a hug. When I tried to let go, they squeezed harder.

I never got random hugs from my mother. We didn't show physical affection.

In Mabel Kwong's 2014 post "When to Hug Someone. And Why Asians Don't Hug," she shares why it's a cultural thing. "In Asian cultures, getting touchy-feely with each other is frowned upon." For some Asians, it's also a way of getting dirty or catching germs, while others are just super aware of personal space.

I give my daughter massive bear hugs. The feeling of her tiny arms wrapped around my neck is something I never want to give up.

3. I want my daughter to know it's okay to have a sense of humor.

When I was younger, I remember sitting on the couch, shaking my leg. My mom said, "In Korea, they say if you shake your leg, you will shake all the luck out of your body."

She laughed loudly, and she never laughed when my brother and I told funny jokes. She was always so serious. In Elena Ruchko's article "Chinese Humor vs American Humor, and How to be Sarcastic," she says it's hard for non-Chinese people to understand Chinese humor because it's deep-rooted in cultural references that can't be translated effectively.

I see how I may not have understood her joke. I'm sure American humor, since English is not her native language, is just as confusing to her.

I make sure my daughter has deep-rooted belly laughs. It's usually when I'm dancing to the Trolls soundtrack. I want her to know laughter is the best medicine.

4. I want my daughter to know it's okay to cry.

The only time I saw my mother cry was by accident. I had walked into her room and she was sitting on the floor, weeping softly into her hands. When she heard me, she sat up and pretended nothing was wrong.

I didn't know how to react, so I walked away. I never brought that moment up because I know she would either deny it or feel embarrassed.

Was refusing to cry part of Asian culture? In Tia Gao's Medium article, "Why Chinese People Don't Cry," she says that for her parents, it was important for immigrants to maintain a positive outlook because "what doesn't kill you makes you stronger." And whenever she started to cry, her parents would brush it aside because they had suffered so much in the past.

I think my mother can relate. She had lived through the Korean War. She endured starvation. Both of her parents died when she was young. She married my father and moved to an unfamiliar country, only to raise two children alone.

She didn't have time to cry.

I tell my daughter it's okay to cry. Instead of bottling emotions deep inside, I let her know it takes more strength to let them out.

5. Finally, I want my daughter to know it's okay to talk about mental health.

Years ago, I had what I called my "early-life crisis." I went into a deep depression, was put on medication and started therapy.

I was terrified to tell my mother.

When I finally told her, she reacted how I expected: She refused to believe me. I needed "to get over it." And I felt as if I failed her. She had always been so strong and here I was, so weak. So, I hid my bouts of depression from everyone for years.

But I eventually learned not to be ashamed of my mental health. I also learned I'm not alone.

There's an insightful article by Ryan Tanap titled "Why Asian-Americans and Pacific Islanders Don't Go to Therapy." It helped me see my mother's point of view: "There's an underlying fear among the Asian-American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) community that getting mental health treatment means you're 'crazy.' If you admit you need help for your mental health, parents and other family members might experience fear and shame. They may assume that your condition is a result of their poor parenting or a hereditary flaw, and that you're broken because of them."

I don't blame my mother for refusing to believe I needed help. She had always denied her own need for help. But I want my daughter to know there is nothing weak about needing help, and there is immense strength when you finally ask for it.

There is nothing more beautiful or frustrating than being a mom. As much as I say I'm not like my mother, deep down I know I am. So I will take to heart everything I learned from her and try to be a good parent.

You might also like:

Trigger warning: This essay describes a woman's emotional journey with losing a baby.

I'm used to being called names. I'm used to negative comments calling me fat, ugly and every name in between. That's life as a television news anchor—not everyone is going to like you. And that's okay. While I am good at brushing off the mean comments, when someone attacks my parenting, that's NOT okay.

I received a message that was not only hurtful, it brought me to tears, as my entire body began shaking. To the woman who called me sick because I talk about my children who died, my heart hurts for you.

As a mother who has experienced child loss, premature birth and infertility, I put my life out on full display. I write and share my family's story as a way to help others, all while getting the chance to share stories about all three of my triplets, even though two are no longer alive. Yes, the Internet can be filled with insensitivity, especially when I discuss topics that, even in 2019, are considered taboo. Most times, I can take the high road, but not today.

The woman called me "sick" for talking about my two children who passed. She told me to lay them to rest and move on, mentioning that I am dragging my husband and child through my "sick state of mind."

It's been five-and-a-half years since my triplets were born, and in all that time, never has a comment made me sick to my stomach. In the minutes after reading this message, so many emotions took over me. I wanted to yell at this woman. I wanted her to know how much words can hurt. And I wanted to know if she has ever lost a child. I tried to calm down, but that message kept coming back to me. I found myself awake throughout the night, quietly sobbing while my heart was racing and hurting at the same time.

I put my life out there on the Internet, so I have to realize that people are entitled to their opinion, even if it's negative. But here's the thing—If you've followed my family and our story for years, you would know that my life is not surrounded by grief and loss.

Social media is not an accurate view of a person's life. You only see snippets on Facebook and Instagram, and oftentimes, you only see the most glamorous, happy moments. I choose to show reality, and it's not always pretty. I share the heartbreaking moments of parenting children in both heaven and earth. Yet, I also show the wonderful moments of raising a daughter who is truly remarkable. If you've followed my story, you would know that I'm the happiest I've been in years. Yes, it's possible to find life after loss and it's possible for grief and happiness to coexist. My life doesn't revolve around grief, and no, I don't dwell over my losses every day.

My daughter is her own person, a unique individual full of joy and spunk. She will always know how special she is and we are constantly finding ways to celebrate her, along with remembering her brother and sister. Yes, my daughter is here. She's alive and present. But, I'm not going to forget that she was a triplet and I'm not going to hide the fact that I'm a mother to two angels above.

I woke up today, exhausted from a lack of sleep and worn out from the emotional toll of this cruel message I received. But, the more I think about it, the more I want to share. I have a unique platform through television and writing where I can be a voice for others. I can share the ups and downs of life and know that I am making a difference. If at least one person reads my words and feels like they are not alone, then it's worth it. For every one negative message I receive, I know that there are hundreds, if not thousands, of people around the world that can relate to my life.

Life has been difficult for my family at times, but we choose to look at the positive. The loss of two of my children is not a burden, I now choose to see it as a blessing. I would give anything to have them here today, but I've learned to find the good in our tragic situation. All three of my children have shaped who I am today. My children have taught me compassion, grace and kindness, all traits this cruel woman could learn from. It's tricky being a parent of child loss, but I'm doing the best that I can and I know all three of my children are proud of me.

Originally posted on Stacey Skrysak.

You might also like:

This long weekend is one of the best times of the year to score deals across various brands.

Here's where to shop for the entire family this weekend:

Home


Target: Up to 25% off home, plus extra 15% off with code HOME

Walmart: Savings across site of up to 30-50%

Wayfair: Up to 70% off furniture, outdoor, mattresses + home

Pottery Barn: Up to 70% off thousands of items

Mattress Firm: King for the price of Queen, Queen for the price of a Twin + flash sales

Sur La Table: Up to 70% off (including Le Creuset cookware!)

Bear Mattress: Save up to $300 + free pillow; $150 off orders over $500 with code PRES150; $300 off orders over $1200 with code PRES300

Overstock: Up to 70% off + free shipping

Riley Home: 30% off entire site from 2/15-2/19

Lifestyle


Nordstrom: Various sales across site

Gymboree: Everything up to 60% off

J.Crew: 30% off your purchase with code WKND

Carters: Up to 50-70% off entire site

H&M: Various deals across site

Janie and Jack: Up to 70% off select styles + 20% off entire purchase

Anthropologie: Extra 40% off sale items

Primary: Use code BESTIE for free plush bestie with $50 order + free shipping

OshKosh B'gosh: Up to 50-70% off entire site + store

Gap: Up to 50% off sitewide + extra 20% off your purchase

The Children's Place: 50% off entire site

Old Navy: Up to 50% off sitewide

Sephora: Various sales sitewide

Zara: Sales across the site

Ulta: Various sales sitewide

Electronics

HP: Save up to 56% on select products + free shipping

B&H: Lightning deals across the site

Best Buy: Various sales across the site

Samsung: Different offers across the site

Newegg: Up to $500 off

Microsoft: Savings on different devices; up to $200 on Surface Pro 6 + free Tumi sleeve

Motherly is your daily #momlife manual; we are here to help you easily find the best, most beautiful products for your life that actually work. We share what we love—and we may receive a commission if you choose to buy.You've got this.

Perinatal depression (defined as depression during pregnancy and the immediate postpartum period) happens to so many mothers, 1 in 7 of us, in fact. It can make pregnancy and early motherhood even harder than it needs to be and rob new mothers of a joyful time they were looking forward to.

And now, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) says there is a way to prevent perinatal depression in the moms who are most at risk. This week the USPSTF published guidelines calling on health care providers to identify at-risk women and connect them with cognitive behavioral therapy and interpersonal therapy.

These counseling interventions are effective in preventing perinatal depression, the USPSTF found, and, as The New York Times reports, the new guidelines mean the kinds of therapies that can prevent moms from becoming depressed with be covered under the Affordable Care Act.

Therapy can change and save lives, but it's often unaffordable. Now, more mothers will have access to it when they need it most.

👏👏👏

Any mom can develop perinatal depression, but certain women are more at risk. Those with a personal or family history of depression and those dealing with stressful circumstances like poverty, divorce, young or solo motherhood are at an increased risk. Past abuse or trauma, gestational diabetes, and experiencing an unplanned or complicated pregnancy also increase a mother's risk for depression during and after pregnancy.

Untreated, perinatal depression can have terrible outcomes for women, babies and families. A proactive approach—getting at-risk moms into therapy before depression hits—could actually prevent the disease and its personal and social consequences.

"We can prevent this devastating illness and it's about time that we did," Karina Davidson, a clinical psychologist and researcher who helped write the recommendations told NPR.

But it won't be easy to do that, says Harvard Medical School psychiatrist Marlene P. Freeman. In an editorial published alongside the USPSTF recommendations, Freeman points out that proactive intervention is a challenging task for the current health system. "Clinicians who provide obstetrical care may not have the expertise or time during clinical visits to perform assessments and tailor referrals to women who are identified," Freeman writes. "Availability and access to care present potential hurdles, and stigma presents another potential barrier for some women to seek and accept mental health care," she continues.

The system and our society are not currently set up to help get moms into cognitive behavioral therapy and interpersonal therapy, but maybe the adoption of these guidelines can change that over time.

Perinatal depression often goes untreated because mothers don't know how or when to ask for help. According to a 2017 study published in the Maternal and Child Health Journal, one in five new moms experiencing postpartum mood disorders doesn't disclose her symptoms to healthcare providers.

That's why the American Academy of Pediatrics released its own depression guidelines in late 2018, urging pediatricians "incorporate recognition and management of perinatal depression into pediatric practice."

If health care providers do what both the USPSTF and the AAP suggest, American mothers could have doctors looking out for their mental health at every stage of the perinatal journey.

You might also like:


Motherly provides information of a general nature and is designed for educational purposes only. This site does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.Your use of the site indicates your agreement to be bound by our  Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Information on our advertising guidelines can be found here.