They say that catastrophic storms are the source of many a baby...and that’s kind of the case for Jamie and Brian Stelter. It was during the Christmas Blizzard of 2010 in NYC that Brian sent this twitter “love note” to NY1’s morning anchor Pat Kiernan: “does jamie shupak have a boyfriend? and how often is she asked out by viewers?” It wasn’t long before Jamie, NY1’s traffic reporter, and Brian, host of CNN’s Reliable Sources, started dating, then got married. And six years after that fateful nor’easter, the couple are expecting their first baby.

Of course, it hasn’t all been a media-made fairytale, especially when it comes to pregnancy. Jamie and Brian have been put through the fertility ringer: two miscarriages, two D&Cs, a PCOS diagnosis and several rounds of IUI and IVF. “I hate the word "trying" because it made me feel so shitty for so long,” says Jamie. “When you try and it doesn't work, you fail. That was my life, and our cycle, for years. Try, fail. Try, fail. But what else is there to call it?”

Last summer, the couple got lucky with some healthy embryos and even luckier to get pregnant on the first transfer. “It was the hardest two-ish years of my life...but in just a few weeks, we'll finally meet this little miracle/rainbow/lovebug of ours.”

The two TV personalities have been open about their fertility struggles, and Jamie says the response has been a blessing. “We shared news of our first miscarriage last February and were flooded with supportive messages from friends, colleagues, total strangers, you name it...many of whom had similar troubles. I wish no one had to struggle with fertility, but so many people do, so why aren't we talking about it more?”

We recently met up with Jamie and Brian to talk pregnancy, parenting and baby oversharing on social media. Here’s what they had to say.

What was your first thought when you found out you were having a baby?

Jamie: I hope it sticks this time.

Brian: Half thrilled, half afraid about the possibility of another miscarriage.

What kind of parent do you think your partner will be?

Jamie: The best, most loving, fun, goofy, compassionate, patient parent.

Brian: Brilliant. She was destined to be a mom.

What’s your plan for baby’s social media debut?

Jamie: All of it. With lots of emojis.

Brian: Baby steps! I want to share everything... but thoughtfully... one step at a time.

What are you most nervous about when it comes to being a parent?

Jamie: Time/energy/money. The normal stuff. Mostly I'm just super excited.

Brian: I have a different answer to this question every day. But most of the nerves are about the basics -- how to give our child the best life possible.

What’s one thing you’ve learned about your partner during this pregnancy experience?

Jamie: That his well of love for me and our future family is even deeper than I thought. And that he'll never say no when I suggest Shake Shack (which I already kind of knew, but can now officially confirm).

Brian: She's really, really good at this. Super-mom.

When we say NYC parents, you say…

Jamie: Little, crazy, lotta fun.

Brian: The best kind!

When we say birth, you say…

Jamie: DRUGS.

Brian: Can't come soon enough!

When we say newborn, you say…

Jamie: Lovebug

Brian: Welcome!

When we say family, you say…

Jamie: Lucky.

Brian: Dream come true.

When we say sleep, you say…

Jamie: LOL

Brian: My usual nine hours a night, no big deal, right?

When we say oversharing, you say…

Jamie: 🙄

Brian: Define "over."

When we say Baby #2, you say…

Jamie: Can’t wait!

Brian: Whatever Jamie says!

Jamie is wearing HATCH Collection's Georgie Jumper.

Photography by Belle Savransky for Well Rounded.

Having a newborn is challenging at the best of times, but during forced isolation and in a climate of fear and uncertainty, it can become overwhelming.

The coronavirus pandemic is setting up our communities for genuine mental health concerns. This may be especially true for new parents. When will 'normal' life return? How will I pay for diapers and baby food? Will my mom be able to help us now? What if my baby or my family get COVID-19? Unfortunately, no one knows the long-term impact or answers just yet.

Most families have built a network of social support by the time they have their first child—if they don't already have a support system, they develop one through various baby classes and groups set up for parents. The creation of the village can be instrumental to the mental health of new parents. Social distancing, the lockdown of cities, and isolation will inadvertently affect the type of support available.

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