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There are some cute (and helpful) graphics floating around the internet that represent just how small newborns stomachs are: On the day of their birth, their stomachs are only as big as a cherry. By two weeks, those tummies have grown to the size of an egg—which is incredible. But do you know what else that means? Babies need food around the clock.

Regardless of whether you are breastfeeding or formula feeding (or both), that means those first weeks of a baby's life may feel more like one marathon chow session. But then, as baby gets bigger and can go longer stretches between eating, that's one of the aspects of newborn life that can fade from a parent's memory. Until another baby comes along to remind you—as Jessie James Decker is now experiencing with her third baby.

"Is it possible for a baby to want to be on the boob 23 hours a day?" Decker jokingly asks in a new Instagram post.

Been there! And it sounds like many of Decker's Instagram followers have been, too.

"My current situation. All day. Every day," one fan said.

Another added, "Our sons were born on the same day!! He is on his 2nd leap so yeah 23 hours is about right!!"

As lactation consultant Wendy Wisner previously said for Motherly, every baby will have unique eating demands, especially in the beginning. "Some babies will seem to have an erratic eating schedule, wanting to nurse every hour for a few hours, and then being passed out for a few hours after that (cluster feeding). All of it is normal."

Although the time between feedings gradually extends, it may seem to revert when baby is going through a growth spurt. All of that is normal and doesn't last forever. Eventually, you will be able to go longer without them asking to be fed—at least until they are toddlers and discover fruit snacks.

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