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The Rock is a proud #girldad who recognizes the strength in women

"She can be anything she wants. She can sit at any table. She can trailblaze a path, while humbly and gratefully recognizing those before her who paved the way," the Rock writes about his daughter.

The Rock is a proud #girldad who recognizes the strength in women

Time and time again, Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson proves that he's not just an action star, he's also #dadgoals as the father to three girls. Except for the dog, The Rock is the lone male in the household he shares with his partner, Lauren Hashian, and, judging by his Insta, he clearly loves raising girls.

This week on Instagram, The Rock marked #womensequalityday by serving up some empowering advice for his daughter Jasmine and her sisters.

"She can be anything she wants. She can sit at any table. She can trailblaze a path, while humbly and gratefully recognizing those before her who paved the way," he captioned a photo of his middle girl shoving a croissant into his mouth.

"She and her big sister, Simone and her baby sister, Tiana Gia will always have a strong voice and always make a positive impact."

Of course this isn't the first time The Rock has noted the strength of women in his social media posts. If you follow The Rock on Instagram (and if you don't, you should) you know that after the birth of his youngest daughter, Tiana Gia, in April, he wrote that he was "blessed and proud to bring another strong girl into this world."

He noted her strength, not her beauty, and described her birth as coming into the world "like a force of nature." He also wrote very passionately about his respect and admiration for Hashian.

"Mama @laurenhashianofficial labored and delivered like a true rockstar," he captioned a delivery room pic. "I was raised and surrounded by strong, loving women all my life, but after participating in baby Tia's delivery, it's hard to express the new level of love, respect and admiration I have for @laurenhashianofficial and all mamas and women out there."

In a post on Mother's Day, The Rock recognized how much Hashian is balancing, as she raises the couple's two daughters, manages a household that's constantly moving to different locations where The Rock's films are being shot, while also working as a song writer and music producer.

It's not uncommon for dads of daughters, like The Rock, to more fully appreciate the women in their lives, and the female perspective in general, after becoming dads.

One study out of Harvard found that "judges with daughters consistently vote in a more feminist fashion on gender issues than judges who have only sons," while another shows that venture capitalists who have daughters are more likely to hire women (and see better financial returns because of it).

Indeed, The Rock has seen some pretty epic financial returns in his career after having a daughter, thanks in no small part to the mother of his oldest. The Rock shares his oldest daughter, 17-year-old Simone with his ex-wife and business partner Dany Garcia. The couple divorced amicably in 2008, right around the time The Rock had made a string of movies that were not exactly blockbusters.

What did The Rock do to turn the boat around? He made his newly ex-wife and co-parent, a former vice president at Merrill Lynch, his manager.

"From the time Dwayne was playing football at University of Miami, to wrestling in the WWE, to emerging in film, I was always in the background guiding him, giving counsel, and adding a business point of view to all the decisions. So I was always very comfortable speaking with his agents or his attorneys, any of the financial individuals, or even the studio executives—because I knew every film is boxed into a business model," Garcia told Marie Claire last year .

She recognized social media as a major opportunity for The Rock, became his producing partner and by 2018 The Rock was racking in $124 million as an actor, according to Forbes, the most yearly earnings for an actor since Forbes started tracking them.

Clearly, The Rock recognizes the strength of the women in his life, and his daughters are no exception. He's right too, we mamas and daughters have so much power within us.

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Time-saving formula tips our editors swear by

Less time making bottles, more time snuggling.

As a new parent, it can feel like feeding your baby is a full-time job—with a very demanding nightshift. Add in the additional steps it takes to prepare a bottle of formula and, well… we don't blame you if you're eager to save some time when you can. After all, that means more time for snuggling your baby or practicing your own well-deserved self-care.

Here's the upside: Many, many formula-feeding mamas before you have experienced the same thing, and they've developed some excellent tricks that can help you mix up a bottle in record time. Here are the best time-saving formula tips from editors here at Motherly.

1. Use room temperature water

The top suggestion that came up time and time again was to introduce bottles with room temperature water from the beginning. That way, you can make a bottle whenever you need it without worrying about warming up water—which is a total lifesaver when you have to make a bottle on the go or in the middle of the night.

2. Buy online to save shopping time

You'll need a lot of formula throughout the first year and beyond—so finding a brand like Comforts, which offers high-quality infant formula at lower prices, will help you save a substantial amount of money. Not to mention, you can order online or find the formula on shelves during your standard shopping trip—and that'll save you so much time and effort as well.

3. Pre-measure nighttime bottles

The middle of the night is the last time you'll want to spend precious minutes mixing up a bottle. Instead, our editors suggest measuring out the correct amount of powder formula into a bottle and putting the necessary portion of water on your bedside table. That way, all you have to do is roll over and combine the water and formula in the bottle before feeding your baby. Sounds so much better than hiking all the way to the kitchen and back at 3 am, right?

4. Divide serving sizes for outings

Before leaving the house with your baby, divvy up any portions of formula and water that you may need during your outing. Then, when your baby is hungry, just combine the pre-measured water and powder serving in the bottle. Our editors confirm this is much easier than trying to portion out the right amount of water or formula while riding in the car.

5. Memorize the mental math

Soon enough, you'll be able to prepare a bottle in your sleep. But, especially in the beginning or when increasing your baby's serving, the mental math can take a bit of time. If #mombrain makes it tough to commit the measurements to memory, write up a cheat sheet for yourself or anyone else who will prepare your baby's bottle.

6. Warm up chilled formula with water

If you're the savvy kind of mom who prepares and refrigerates bottles for the day in advance, you'll probably want to bring it up to room temperature before serving. Rather than purchase a bottle warmer, our editors say the old-fashioned method works incredibly well: Just plunge the sealed bottle in a bowl of warm water for a few minutes and—voila!—it's ready to serve.

Another great tip? Shop the Comforts line on Comfortsforbaby.com to find premium baby products for a fraction of competitors' prices. Or, follow @comfortsforbaby for more information!

This article was sponsored by The Kroger Co. Thank you for supporting the brands that support Motherly and mamas.

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