It's a boy! Britain has a new royal baby (that America can claim, too)!

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex welcomed their first child today, and of course, all eyes are on Windsor waiting for the first look at this royal baby, who isn't quite a prince but is absolutely already making history.

"We are pleased to announce that Their Royal Highnesses The Duke and Duchess of Sussex welcomed their firstborn child in the early morning on May 6th, 2019. Their Royal Highnesses' son weighs 7lbs. 3oz," the royal couple's staff said in a statement posted on their Instagram account. "The Duchess and baby are both healthy and well, and the couple thank members of the public for their shared excitement and support during this very special time in their lives."

Unlike his cousins, Princess Charlotte and Princes George and Louis, this baby isn't a prince or princess, because that title is reserved for the children of the Queen's eldest grandson (unless the Queen were to step in and make an exception).

That could be a good thing for Baby Sussex, though. Having a "lesser" title like Earl or Lady could translate to more freedom from strict royal protocols. Prince Harry's aunt, Princess Anne, famously did not want the titles of prince and princess titles for her children, Zara Tindall and Peter Phillips, something Zara (now a mom herself) has said she's grateful for.

In a 2015 interview, Tindall explained that she was glad her parents chose not to ask for or accept titles from the Queen, as royal titles (and the responsibilities that go with them) can be a burden, especially for a small child. "I'm very lucky that both my parents decided to not use the title and we grew up and did all the things that gave us the opportunity to do," Tindall told The TImes.

Prince Harry knows better than anyone just how heavy a burden the title of Prince or Princess can be for a child, so he's probably just fine with Baby Sussex being as close to a regular kid as possible.

Baby Sussex doesn't have the same title as their cousins, but he will likely have one thing the Cambridge kids don't: American citizenship!

The UK and the U.S. both allow citizens to hold dual citizenship, and both countries allow citizenship to be passed from parents to children.

Congrats to Meghan and Harry on their beautiful new royal baby! 🎉

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