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'Workin' Moms' season 4 airs tonight!

This is the perfect pandemic binge-watch for after bedtime.

working moms

If you've run through all your "after the kids are in bed" shows, we've got a suggestion for your next Netflix binge: Workin' Moms.

It's sometimes a comedy, sometimes a drama and often relatable—and Season 4 is coming to Netflix on May 6!

If you have not watched Workin' Moms yet, now is the perfect time to catch up. It's the perfect way to distract yourself from coronavirus without leaving the house.



Showrunner Catherine Reitman also stars in the series, which was originally greenlit by Canada's public broadcaster, the CBC, before being exported to Netflix. Reitman (a mom of two young sons who's spoken publicly about her own postpartum struggles) created an all-female writers room for the project, and you can totally tell.

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The show follows four moms who are going back to work after becoming parents, and moms all over the world are relating to the series, likely in part because staffing the production with so many women infuses the show with an undercurrent of authenticity that's hard to come by in television.

"Because there is less female storytelling, especially motherhood storytelling, there has been immense pressure on my storytelling to represent more people, and to do so in a sort of of [sic] unrealistic way," Reitman recently told Forbes.

The moms—Reitman's character Kate and her longtime friend, Anne, who meet fellow mamas Jenny and Frankie at a moms group—deal with work problems, sex problems (this show has some very "not for kids" moments), relationship and parenting problems.

Reitman's characters are in some ways more privileged than many working moms, and some of the humorous scenarios are unrealistic, but the feelings the moms are dealing with aren't.

Reitman and her team get it. They get pumping in the bathroom, they get being frustrated, they get the mental load of motherhood and the unrealistic work culture expectations that stress parents out.

"There's a repression against mothers where we're expected to be full-time workers and pretend we're not mothers, and then expected to be full-time mothers who pretend we're not working. Simultaneously, within the hours of the week that exist," Reitman tells Variety.

That's the reality for so many working moms who can see themselves reflected in Reitman's work, which isn't just about creating stories for women, but also creating opportunities for them. The show has women in 70% of the department led positions, and Reitman was serious about considering women for high-level positions, even when, on paper, their resumes had a gap or showed they hadn't been given the kinds of opportunities they were looking for.

"We've hired a lot of less-experienced women and I'll tell you, the gamble has paid off every time," says Reitman, who is proving that when women have the opportunity to lead they can create international success stories.

The first three seasons of Workin' Moms are available on Netflix right now and the fourth season is airing on CBC Gem in Canada. There will be a season 5, as CBC has renewed the series for yet another season of working motherhood.

[This piece was originally published March 5, 2019 and has been updated.]


In This Article

    These are only the vitamins I give my children and here's why

    It's hard to say who loves these more—my kids or me.

    When I became a mama five years ago, I didn't put too much thought into whether my son was getting the right vitamins and minerals. From breastfeeding to steaming and pureeing his first bites of solid food, I was confident I was giving him everything to support his growth and development.

    But then the toddler years—and the suddenly picky palate that accompanied them—came along. Between that challenge and two additional children in the mix… well, I knew my oldest son's eating plan was falling short in some vitamin and mineral categories.

    I also knew how quickly he was growing, so I wanted to make sure he was getting the nutrients he needed (even on those days when he said "no, thank you" to any veggie I offered).

    So when I discovered the new line of children's supplements from Nature's Way®, it felt like a serious weight off my chest. Thanks to supplements that support my children's musculoskeletal growth, their brain function, their immune systems, their eyes and more, I'm taken back to that simpler time when I was so confident my kids' vitamin needs were met.*

    It wasn't just the variety of supplements offered by Nature's Way that won me over: As a vegetarian mama, I'm the picky one in the family when it comes to scanning labels and making sure they meet our standards. The trick is that most gummy vitamins are made with gelatin, which is not vegetarian friendly.

    But just like the other offerings from Nature's Way that I've already come to know and love, the children's supplement line is held to a high standard. That means there's no high-fructose corn syrup, gelatin or common allergens to be found in the supplements. The best part? My two oldest kids ensure we never miss their daily vitamins—they are so in love with the gummy flavors, which include tropical fruit punch, lemonade and wild berry.


    Nature's Way Kids Mulitvitamin


    Meanwhile, my pharmacist husband has different criteria when evaluating supplements, especially when it comes to those for our kids. He appreciates the variety of options from Nature's Way, which gives us the ability to rotate the vitamins based on our kids' daily needs. By keeping various children's supplements from Nature's Way on hand, I can customize a regimen to suit my kids' individual requirements.

    Of course, high-quality products often come at a higher price point. But (to my immense gratitude!) that isn't the case with Nature's Way, which retails for a competitive value when compared to the other items on the shelf.

    Like all mamas, my chief concern is supporting my children's health in any way I can. While I see evidence of their growth every time I pack away clothes they've outgrown, I know there is much more growth that doesn't meet the eye. That's why, for my oldest son, I like stacking the Brain Builder gummy with the Growing Bones & Muscles gummy and the Happy & Healthy Multi. My 3-year-old also enjoys getting her own mix to include the Healthy Eyes gummy. And both of my older kids are quick to request the Tummy Soothe tablet when something isn't sitting right in their stomachs.* And I'll admit it: I've tried it myself and the berry blast flavor really is tasty!

    Although my current phase of motherhood may not be as "simple" as it once was, there is so much to appreciate about it—like watching my kids play and sing and create with their incredible imaginations. Along the way, I've eased up on some of my need for control, but it does help to have this range of supplements in my motherhood tool kit. So while I may not be able to convince my son to try kale, having the Nature's Way supplements on hand means I do know he's right on track.*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food & Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.


    This article was sponsored by Nature's Way. Thank you for supporting the brands that support Motherly and mamas.

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    Countdown to Mama: 14 mama-tested, mama-approved presents to get excited about a new baby

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    It's 2020, but for American mothers, it's still the 1950s

    Once a woman in America becomes a mother, our society transports her back in time. In an instant, generations of sexist ideas and structures descend back upon her.

    We like to think that women have come so far.

    We have our educations. Today, our education system not only allows girls to thrive, but it has enabled the first generation in history—Millennials—in which women are more highly educated than men.

    We have choice. Access to family planning has given American women life-changing control over their fertility and the decision to start a family.

    We have basic respect. Today, our marriages are built on the principle that partners are equal regardless of gender.

    We have careers. It's utterly common for a woman to return to work after having a child.

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    We have acknowledgment. And our culture even declares that caregiving is essential work for both mothers and fathers.

    We have possibilities. And all of the potential our lives as women hold now gives girls the hope that anything is possible.

    But the truth is that American motherhood has the veneer of being modern, without any of the structures to support our actual lives today.

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