Print Friendly and PDF

Ahhh, summertime... warm, lazy days, swimming, lots of ice cream, and hopefully a family vacation or two for the chance to relax and unwind with the ones you love the most. But if the thought of packing for that vacation has you stressed, mama, we're here to help!

Let's face it: Traveling with little ones is daunting. So much so, that lots of people just give up on the idea! But we're here to tell you that you shouldn't—sure, seeing the world with a tiny tot on your hip is tricky, but it's doable and the memories will literally last you a lifetime.

To get you on the right packing path, we've put together a list of vacation must-haves that will make your next trip a whole lot easier. Whether you're headed to a remote international location or a beach a couple of hours away, you're going to need an arsenal of baby-proof products to make the journey seamless and fun.

These are the 13 items you don't want to leave off your packing list!

1. The crib

BabyBjorn Travel Crib

When you're away from home, finding a safe, comfy spot for baby to sleep is key. It's also key to find a travel crib that's lightweight, easy to carry, compact, and doesn't take a PhD to open and close. Enter the BabyBjorn Travel Crib Light: our absolute favorite travel crib, ever. Yup, it's that good.

Weighing in at only 13 pounds, this crib is perfect for any family adventure. Setup is super easy (truly—once you get the hang of it, it takes about one minute), and the mattress is much more comfortable than any other travel crib on the market that we've tried.

The mesh sides allow for great air flow, and the crib works for kiddos up to 35 lbs. And best of all? The travel cribs folds up easily into a tiny carrying case, making it perfect to take on the go.

$299.99

2. The bassinet

Ultra Compact Travel Bassinet

If your baby is still teensy—too small for the above crib—consider this Delta Ultra Compact Travel Bassinet. Surround by an exterior of breathable mesh, the bassinet is the perfect place to lay babies age infant to five months old. Our favorite features are the washable fabrics and the electronic pod that emits sound, vibration and a soft light (if you want it during late-night feeds!). The bassinet weighs just 10 pounds and folds flat and can be carried to and fro via the included travel bag. Whether you're traveling to grandma's house or a hotel in Italy, this is your most portable bet for a baby bassinet.

$79.99

3. The sound machine

Rohm Travel Sound Machine

If you employ a sound machine at home... then you better be bringing one on the road! We love the Rohm—it's the mini, on-the-go version of our favorite Dohm sound machine from Yogasleep. Packing an equally masking sound in a much smaller package, the Rohm can be attached to your stroller for an on-the-go nap or place in a travel crib for a good night's sleep.

Just 3.5-inches in diameter and 3.8 ounces in weight, the Rohm takes up zero space... but it will be a lifesaver when you find yourself in a noisy restaurant or a foreign hotel room that baby simply is not having. It offers up three sounds (white noise, deep noise and ocean) and can operate all night long on one single charge. Amen to that!

$19.99

4. The travel stroller

Colugo Stroller

There are so many travel stroller options out there, but this one caught our eye... how could it not with this pattern?! And fear not, this pride-themed pattern isn't the only punchy pattern on offer, there's also a pretty floral, a sassy leopard and your basic black (and others!), too. But the real reason why it made our list is two-fold—the Colugo Stroller is both portable and durable.

At 16 pounds, it's not the lightest on the market, but the featherweight strollers on the market are not going to cut it on gravel or bumpy sidewalks! Colugo's no-puncture tires and maximum suspension give the ride of a bigger, utilitarian stroller, while the one-hand fold, carrying strap (a carrying backpack also comes with the purchase), and it's ability to fit in most airplane overhead bins solidify it's positioning as a travel stroller. At this price, you'll be surprised to learn that it also comes with a UPF 50 sunshade canopy and an ample storage basket.

$285.00

5. The car seat

WAYB Pico Car Seat

Our editor-in-chief tried the WAYB Pico Forward Facing Carseat while flying cross-country with her toddler recently, and, let's just say she's now a huge fan. "We've gone through several travel car seats and this is by far my favorite one," says Karell. "It's the lightest (only 8 pounds!) and the least complicated to set up. I especially love the travel bag because it makes the folded up car seat like a backpack you can just schlep around with you to your next adventure. I can't stop recommending it to all my mama friends."

$320

6. The potty

OXO Tot 2-In-1 Go Potty

Have you ever been out in the wild with a toddler who has to go potty? There's no "hold it for a few minutes, honey." Nope, they need to go NOW. Which is why a portable potty is a must. We love the OXO Tot 2-in-1 Go Potty, because as it's name suggests, it's dual purposed. First, it's a standalone potty that you can plop down in your car trunk (or the middle of an airport terminal if it's a true emergency!), add the disposable bag and BAM, problem solved.

It's second purpose is for those times when you have in fact found a bathroom, but you'd rather walk over hot coals than sit your kiddo directly on the toilet seat. In these scenarios, simply fold out the seat legs and place the potty on top of the seat (grips keep it stable on both round and elongated seats), and there you have a solution!

We love that it comes with a wipeable travel bag, it's got a shield that prevents splatter and that the seat is perfectly sized for tiny hineys. And at 1.5 pounds and 10- by 12-inches, it's not going to weigh you down.

$19.99

7. The mat

Gathre Mats

Summer is the perfect time to relax on the beach or spread out for a family picnic. To keep everyone mess-free (and sand-free!), we absolutely 💜Gathre mats. Made from a soft bonded leather that's water impermeable and easy to wipe clean, they're a beautiful place to, well...gather!

Whether you need a spot on the beach, a place for a family meal, or your stuck at an airport gate due to a weather delay, the uses for these mats are truly endless. And have we mentioned they are absolutely gorgeous? You're going to have trouble choosing between the huge assortment of modern colors and prints.

$20

8. The highchair substitute

Phil & Ted's Lobster chair

If your little one is eating solids, tossing your high chair in the trunk of your car for your next family vacation probably isn't going to fly. The Phil & Ted's Lobster chair is a safe, easily portable solution for families on the go.

Featuring a 4-point safety harness with padded shoulder straps and super strong 'lobster claws' with rubber grips, the Lobster is quick and easy to clip to any stable countertop or table. It's also easy to open, close and store—it folds up and slides right into its own carrying bag.

The chair's fabric slides out of the frame for cleaning, and it even comes with a dishwasher-safe food tray that slides between the clamps to keep those gross restaurant germs off of baby's tiny hands. And it's safe for babies up to 3 years old and 37 lbs.!

$89.99

9. The bottle-cleaning solution

OXO Tot On-the-Go Drying Kit

This one may not seem like a must-have, but trust us here. We can't tell you the amount of times we've gone on vacation and realized we didn't have anything to clean our bottles or straw cups except for the dingy sponge sitting next to the sink at our beach rental house 🙈 Was it the end of the world? Definitely not. But remembering to throw the OXO Tot On-the-Go Drying Kit into our suitcases would have made things a whole lot easier.

We love how the brush comes apart and fits securely into the carrying case (which also doubles as a drying rack for bottles, nipples, or even breast pump parts—genius!) and comes with everything you need to keep bottles and cups clean while you're away from home. The whole thing is top-rack dishwasher safe, making it easy to clean before you pack it away for your next adventure.

$14.99

10. The carrier

Ergobaby Omni 360 Air Mesh

For hands-free baby carrying, or for when a stroller isn't an option, we love the ease and portability of a baby carrier. Carriers offer a great spot for babies to get a birds-eye view of all the sights and sounds around them, and are also the perfect place to snuggle up next to mom or dad for a nap on the move.

For summer travel especially, the Ergobaby Omni 360 Cool Air Mesh is our carrier of choice. The Omni will keep baby comfy with multiple carry positions, and mom or dad comfy with a wide, padded waistband and a soft mesh fabric that allows for breathability and air flow for those sticky summer days. The Omni works from seven to 45 pounds (from newborn to toddler!), so it will be around for lots and lots of family adventures. Bonus: The carrier has been acknowledged as "hip healthy" by the International Hip Dysplasia Institute.

$179.00

11. The backpack

MZ Wallace Metro Backpack

If there's one universal truth about motherhood that we can all agree on, it's that babies come with a lot of stuff. The last thing you want to worry about when you're away from home is not having a change of clothes or a stash of snacks on hand (can we say 4-hour flight delay, anyone?), so you're going to need a roomy, comfortable place to store all of those emergency must-haves and a back means you'll be hands-free, which is KEY when you're on the go with little ones.

Enter: MZ Wallace's Metro Backpack. Available in 10 eye-catching colors and patterns, this backpack is roomy enough to hold all the extras (wipes, pacifiers, blankies, sippy cups, you name it!). We love the two exterior side pockets because they're deep enough to hold a bottle, the front zipper pocket (perfect for your easy-access items like your phone and wallet) and the detachable interior pouch—ya know, for those times when little pookie happens to puke on the plane. Bonus: Its quilted nylon fabric and luxe hardware don't scream "mom bag!!!"

$245.00

12. The travel shoes

Step foot inside Plae's Crosby and you'll never want to pack bulky shoes again. Perfect for breezing through airport security lines (no laces!), this super versatile ballerina flat comes in eight punchy colorways that will add some serious spunk to your travel day style. The best parts, however, are that the shoes are designed to compress completely flat--you can even store a pair in your glove compartment with ease!--and they are crazy comfortable. Oh, and they're machine washable and made from recycled PET. What's not to love?

$79.95

13. The sunscreen

Blue Lizard Baby

Protecting your little one from the sun is so important—but so is keeping them safe from harmful chemicals. Although choosing a natural sunscreen can be daunting, we've landed on Blue Lizard Baby, which we think rocks for lots of reasons.

It uses only natural mineral barriers (including Zinc Oxide); it has no potentially irritating chemicals; it offers broad spectrum UVA and UVB skin protection; and it's very highly rated by EWG. And, unlike lots of Zinc-based sunscreens, it's easy to apply and doesn't leave a thick, white coating behind. The bottle even turns pink when exposed to harmful UV rays, reminding you to cover up. How useful—and fun—is that?

$14.98

Motherly is your daily #momlife manual; we are here to help you easily find the best, most beautiful products for your life that actually work. We share what we love—and we may receive a commission if you choose to buy. You've got this.

You might also like:


The very best of Motherly — delivered when you need it most.
Subscribe for inspiration, empowering articles and expert tips to rock your best #momlife.

When it comes to holiday gifts, we know what you really want, mama. A full night's sleep. Privacy in the bathroom. The opportunity to eat your dinner while it's still hot. Time to wash—and dry!—your hair. A complete wardrobe refresh.


While we can't help with everything on your list (we're still trying to figure out how to get some extra zzz's ourselves), here are 14 gift ideas that'll make you look, if not feel, like a whole new woman. Even when you're sleep deprived.

Gap Cable-Knit Turtleneck Sweater

When winter hits, one of our go-to outfits will be this tunic-length sweater and a pair of leggings. Warm and everyday-friendly, we can get behind that.

$69.95

Gap Cigarette Jeans

These high-waisted straight-leg jeans have secret smoothing panels to hide any lumps and bumps (because really, we've all got 'em).

$79.95

Tiny Tags Gold Skinny Bar Necklace

Whether engraved with a child's name or date of birth, this personalized necklace will become your go-to piece of everyday jewelry.

$135.00

Gap Brushed Pointelle Crew

This wear-with-anything soft pink sweater with delicate eyelet details can be dressed up for work or dressed down for weekend time with the family. Versatility for the win!

$79.95

Gap Flannel Pajama Set

For mamas who sleep warm, this PJ set offers the best of both worlds: cozy flannel and comfy shorts. Plus, it comes with a coordinating eye mask for a blissed-out slumber.

$69.95

Spafinder Gift Card

You can't give the gift of relaxation, per say, but you can give a gift certificate for a massage or spa service, and that's close enough!

$50.00

Gap Stripe Long Sleeve Crewneck

This featherweight long-sleeve tee is the perfect layering piece under hoodies, cardigans, and blazers.

$29.95

Gap Chenille Smartphone Gloves

Gone are the days of removing toasty gloves before accessing our touchscreen devices—thank goodness!

$9.95

Ember Temperature Control Smart Mug

Make multiple trips to the microwave a thing of the past with a app-controlled smart mug that'll keep your coffee or tea at the exact temperature you prefer for up to an hour.

$99.95

Gap Flannel Shirt

Our new favorite flannel boasts an easy-to-wear drapey fit and a flattering curved shirttail hem.

$59.95

Gap Sherpa-Lined Denim Jacket

Stay warm while looking cool in this iconic jean jacket, featuring teddy bear-soft fleece lining and a trendy oversized fit.

$98.00

Gap Crazy Stripe Scarf

Practical and stylish, this cozy scarf adds a pop of color—well, colors—to any winter ensemble.

$39.95

Nixplay Seed Frame

This digital picture frame is perfect for mamas who stay up late scrolling through their phone's photo album to glimpse their kiddos being adorable. By sending them to this smart frame to view throughout the day, you can get a few extra minutes of sleep at night!

$165.00

Gap Crewneck Sweater

Busy mamas will appreciate that this supersoft, super versatile Merino wool sweater is machine washable.

$59.95

This article was sponsored by GAP. Thank you for supporting the brands that support Motherly and Mamas.

Our Partners

[Editor's note: Motherly is committed to covering all relevant presidential candidate plans as we approach the 2020 election. We are making efforts to get information from all candidates. Motherly does not endorse any political party or candidate. We stand with and for mothers and advocate for solutions that will reduce maternal stress and benefit women, families and the country.]

When the race began, it was a crowded field—but the closer we get to 2020, fewer and fewer Democratic candidates remain in the race for the presidency. Exits of once high-profile candidates, including Kirsten Gillibrand and Beto O'Rourke, have narrowed the field, and when the fifth democratic debate occurs this week, only 10 candidates are expected to take the stage.

The fifth debate is happening Wednesday, November 20 at 9 p.m. ET and will air on MSNBC.

So where do the 10 candidates in the fifth democratic debate stand on issues of importance to parents? We're keeping track of the plans they're putting forth and how they could impact your family.

Elizabeth Warren

Elizabeth Warren

Paid leave: Wants to see "at least 12 weeks of paid family and medical leave" as noted in her Green Manufacturing Plan.

Childcare costs: Warren plans to introduce Universal Child Care as a right for every child in America. The plan would see the federal government partner with states, municipalities, school districts, nonprofits, tribes and faith-based organizations "to create a network of child care options that would be available to every family."

Health care: Warren is down for Medicare for All, and wants every person in America to have full health care coverage without any middle class tax increase.

Joe Biden

Joe Biden

Paid leave: Biden has not made a statement about a specific plan or number of weeks he wants to see for paid family leave.

Childcare costs: Biden plans to "provide high-quality, universal pre-kindergarten for all three- and four-year-olds."

Health care: Biden plans to build on the Affordable Care Act to offer an affordable public option to American families.

Kamala Harris

Kamala Harris

Paid leave: As noted on her website, "Harris will fight for the FAMILY Act to provide workers with up to 12 weeks of paid family and medical leave" and her Children's Agenda includes plans for "up to 6 months of paid family and medical leave for workers nationwide."

Childcare costs: Harris wants to pass the Child Care for Working Families Act, which would see caps on the amount amount of money low- and middle-income families pay for childcare (with some families paying nothing) and would invest in childcare providers. She also wants to try extending the school day to close the after school care gap.

Health care: Harris wants to see Medicare for AllMedicare for All "cover all medically necessary services, including emergency room visits, doctor visits, vision, dental, hearing aids, mental health, and substance use disorder treatment, and comprehensive reproductive health care services".

Bernie Sanders

Bernie Sanders

Paid leave: Sanders co-sponsored The FAMILY Act to give workers at least 12 weeks of universal paid family and medical leave.

Childcare costs: Sanders has stated he is in favor of universal childcare. "We have a dysfunctional childcare system in this country, which is too expensive for parents, while providers are paid totally inadequate wages. We need to do what other countries around the world do—develop a high quality universal childcare program," he tweeted.

Health care: As noted on his website, Sanders plans to "create a Medicare for All, single-payer, national health insurance program to provide everyone in America with comprehensive health care coverage, free at the point of service."

Pete Buttigieg

Pete Buttigieg

Paid leave: Buttigieg supports the FAMILY Act and wants to see 12 weeks of paid leave.

Childcare costs: Promising a "comprehensive child care plan will make high-quality child care free for families most in need, and affordable for all."

Health care: His plan is called Medicare for All Who Want It. As explained on his website, under this plan "everyone will be able to opt in to an affordable, comprehensive public alternative. This affordable public plan will incentivize private insurers to compete on price and bring down costs. If private insurers are not able to offer something dramatically better, this public plan will create a natural glide-path to Medicare for All."

Andrew Yang

Andrew Yang

Paid leave: As stated on his website, Yang plans to "propose and fight for a paid family leave policy, requiring employers to offer at least 9 months of paid family leave, distributed between parents however they see fit; or 6 months of paid leave for a single parent."

Childcare costs: Yang plans to "create a pre-kindergarten public education system for all 3 and 4-year-olds" to "get kids off to a better start, and [relieve] families from having to find and pay for daycare for their children".

Health care: Yang says that though a "Medicare for All system, we can ensure that all Americans receive the healthcare they deserve."

Amy Klobuchar

Amy Klobuchar

Paid leave: Her plans to support workers include: "garanteeing up to 12 weeks of paid family leave and allowing workers to earn paid sick leave."

Childcare costs: Worked with Republican Dan Sullivan to introduced the the Child Care Workforce and Facilities Act, "to bring the cost of child care down and provide more child care centers in areas that need them the most."

Health care: On her website she states she: supports universal health care for all Americans, and she believes the quickest way to get there is through a public option that expands Medicare or Medicaid. She supports changes to the Affordable Care Act to help bring down costs to consumers including providing cost-sharing reductions, making it easier for states to put reinsurance in place, and continuing to implement delivery system reform

Cory Booker

Cory Booker

Paid leave: Like several other candidates, Booker supports the FAMILY Act, which would give parents 12 weeks of parental leave. His website states he "also supports efforts to expand paid family and medical leave proposals to help more low-income workers start with higher wage replacement rates."

Childcare costs: Booker plans to build on the Child Care for Working Families Act, to create "sweeping federal investment in high quality child care to make it affordable for all working families."

Health care: Plans to fight for Medicare for All (but he is not calling to eliminate private insurance companies).

Tulsi Gabbard

Tulsi Gabbard

Paid leave: Like many of her fellow candidates, Gabbard supports The Family Act. which would see parents get 12 weeks of leave.

Child care costs: Plans unclear.

Health care: Gabbard "supports the Medicare for All Act and serves on the Medicare for All Caucus".

Tom Steyer

Tom Steyer

Paid leave: Plans unclear.

Child care costs: Plans unclear.

Health care: Plans to "create a competitive public option to drive down costs, expand coverage, and deliver quality care to everyone who lives here, including the undocumented community," according to his website.

News

While dropping my son off at preschool the other day, I saw a grown man kneel down, stare deeply into his daughter's eyes, and sweetly say, "Be kind, be strong, and have a wonderful day!" The whole scene made me feel like I needed to step it up in the mom department, since my goodbye consists of yelling, "Bye son!" as he runs towards his singing, maraca-shaking teacher. This preschool father was clearly a saint, and his heartfelt speech made me feel bad, so what kind of parent did that make me?

We've all read about the "types" of parenting styles and maybe even taken an online quiz or two to figure out if we're a Snowplow or a Helicopter or a Laid Back Progressive. All the types I read about never really felt like a perfect fit, so I decided to take matters into my own hands and create some new parenting styles that I can get behind.

FEATURED VIDEO

As you're pigeonholing yourself via the types I've come up with, feel free to mix and match, since most of us shapeshift between a Hummingbird and an Authoritarian and a Permissive parent, depending on the day...

The saint

Like the dad at my son's preschool, Saints kneel and listen. They respond to toddler tantrums with superhuman patience and they recite soothing mantras while their child flings spaghetti at the wall or dunks another Elmo toothbrush in the toilet. There aren't many of these parents in the world, but I know you exist because I saw one at preschool drop off and immediately felt like repenting.

The free(ish) range parent

Unlike the more common Free Range Parent, the Free(ish) Range Parent will let their kids roam and explore, but only if they're within shouting distance. Like yearning to be cool as a teenager, I now yearn to be a Free Range Parent.

The problem is that I live in a city and not a lovely and endless piece of land, so it's hard to disguise my terror when it comes to moving vehicles, strange people lurking at parks, or pools, ponds, lakes, fountains—basically bodies of water of any kind.

The Free(ish) Range Parent doesn't need to hover when their toddler goes down a "big kid" slide or scales a 3-foot climbing wall. Yet, although they may appear relaxed, they're primed and ready to pounce if a fall or scrape occurs.

The cosmic mama

Wouldn't we all love to be a Cosmic Mama? The kind of parent who chooses a home birth, who is bold enough to refuse an epidural, and who finds breastfeeding relaxing. I'm not so bold, but I did have a few, very brief cosmic moments when my son was a newborn. Over the three months that I nursed him, I would say there were maybe one to three total minutes of heavenly bonding bliss, which were quickly overshadowed by the more mundane moments of pain and discomfort. Those fleeting moments were pretty great, but probably not enough to qualify me as a Cosmic Mama. Again, I repent.

The keepin' it real mama

This type of parent can often be seen walking into an important work meeting with a large patch of dried baby spit-up on the front of their black Anthropologie jumpsuit, which they bought because it made them feel stylish after being on maternity leave and wearing nothing but a dirty robe and plush socks for three months. They sometimes eat their child's Puffs at the park because they're starving and desperate and forgot to pack their own adult snacks. That said, no matter how ravenous they are they always selflessly leave enough Puffs for their kid.

Depending on their level of exhaustion, if a pacifier falls onto the airport floor, the Keepin' it Real might just give it two halfhearted wipes on their pants leg and mumble, "Well, it'll build their immune system," before handing it back to their child. They might not make gourmet meals for their kids, but they're highly skilled at hiding broccoli and spinach inside of quesadillas. The Keepin' it Real is no Saint, but they're trying—really, really hard.

After careful consideration, I've come to realize that I am approximately 98% Keepin' it Real, with 2% Free(ish) Range Parent thrown in, and I'm okay with it. I've surreptitiously eaten the Puffs and been oblivious to the spit up on my clothes, but that doesn't mean I don't love my kid.

When it comes down to it, we're all just trying our best, regardless of our parenting styles.



Life

You may have watched your child struggle during play dates, talking over their friend, laughing when the joke is no longer funny or becoming too upset over the littlest thing, and wondered when or if you should step in.

As a mama, coaching your child to improve their social skills is the best way to help them learn. Some kids need help developing social skills that will allow them to feel comfortable interacting with others. But when a football coach is watching a football game they do not suit up and take over. They make notes to give the players at half time.

FEATURED VIDEO

The best thing you can do for your child is to coach them in private and then act as a silent observer when they are putting their skills into practice. Let your child take ownership over the skills and then you can discuss afterward how it felt.

Here are a few strategies to help you coach from the sidelines during play dates, mama:

1. The problem: The other child is being mean and not listening to your child's requests to play with certain toys.

Should you interfere: Yes

Reason: This is a great teachable moment. Being mean is never okay. Explain that everyone should be treated with respect.

What you can do: Ask the other child if there is something you can help with. Help the children problem solve and set expectations for things we can say or not say.

2. The problem You hear your child being rude and thoughtless.

Should you intervene: No

Reason: As long as your child is trying to practice his emerging skills, it is important for you not to interfere all the time. As long as your child or the playmate are not being mean or cruel, allowing your child and their playmate to work out sharing and meeting each other halfway is part of your child's growth. Additionally, feedback from other children help your child learn about social communication and its consequences—what's funny, what isn't, what keeps play going and what stops it. Any challenges are just showing you what you need to work on before your next play date.

What you can do: Employ a subtle cue or code word to remind your child of his mission like entering the room with snacks, suggesting a specific game or saying a code word like "popcorn."

3. The problem: The children are excited and implementing dangerous behavior.

Should you interfere: Yes

Reason: Whenever there is a safety issue you must jump in to make sure all children are safe. If children are playing with something dangerous, planning an adventure that will lead to safety issues, playing too rough or playing in a space that is not child friendly, jump in and make sure the children know what they are doing is unsafe and what your expectations are going forward.

What you can do: Reinforce safety rules. Create a space and situation where danger is removed and manage any behaviors that might cause harm.

4. The problem: A specific toy or activity is causing arguments between the playmates.

Should you interfere: Yes

Reason: This is a great opportunity to teach your child how to manage conflict.

What you can do: Limit your management of the situation by promoting problem-solving, suggesting that the children put the toy away and offer them a timer to promote turn-taking. After the play date, help your child formulate strategies to help your child learn to manage conflict with friends. The goal is to teach your child the skills to manage relationships without you.

5. The problem: Your child is being clingy and is coming to you to solve every problem.

Should you interfere: No

Reason: You want to help your child stop the clingy behavior rather than reinforcing the idea that they can constantly come back to you.

What can you do: When your child repeatedly approaches you, ask them to think about how they can handle the situation. Prompt them to problem solve, ask what is making them come back so often. Remind them of their mission. What can they do to have fun in the circumstances they're in? Explain that you expect them to try that before coming to get you.
Ultimately, your goal is to help your child generalize the new skills and behaviors—take them from the small stage of home practice to the larger one of a play date. To do so, your child needs to learn to recognize and address what's getting in the way.


Learn + Play

We know how it goes, mama: You finally start finding your footing in the new mama life, and them BAM! Baby is up again at all hours and you seriously don't know why—or when you'll ever get to sleep again. The good news: The 4-month sleep regression is normal, common and temporary. You've got this. But in the meantime, we tip our ☕️ to you!

We talked to the experts at the Baby Sleep Site. Here's what they had to say about how to weather this sleepless storm:

Sleep regressions are normal

The 4-month mark is a big milestone, because it marks the first (and usually the most disruptive and challenging) sleep regression of your baby's life. At 4 months of age, your baby undergoes some major brain developments that impact her sleeping patterns. They become more aware of the world around them. And simply put, your baby starts sleeping less like a baby and more like an adult.

FEATURED VIDEO

What changes can I expect?

During this time, you can expect a baby who may have been sleeping fairly well is suddenly waking up every 20 minutes during the day, and almost as frequently at night. It's also common for your little one to experience shorter naps, fussiness at nap and bedtimes and a general disdain for sleep.

Sleep regressions are different for every baby, but you can expect the regression to last from two to six weeks.

This is a challenging time, but try not to worry. Your baby will be looking to you to help navigate them through this—and there are many ways you can do that.

The solution

There is really no fix for the 4 month sleep regression; these changes to your baby's sleeping patterns are permanent and unavoidable. But don't despair. You CAN reclaim your nights by simply teaching your baby how to fall asleep without the use of any sleep associations, like rocking or feeding to sleep. That process is called sleep coaching but understand that it's not for everyone. But if sleep is a real problem in your home, then sleep coaching can be a nice option.

Sleep coaching methods include putting baby to bed drowsy but not asleep, picking up your baby for a bit when they cry and then putting them back down, sitting in a chair to provide a reassuring presence, or even allowing baby limited time to cry it out. There is no one size fits all method for babies and families, so you need to test what works best for you.

Also, understand that four months is generally the earliest you should work on sleep coaching, and it's best to use gentle, gradual methods at this young age.

Sleep times will vary

During this time, you can expect your baby to sleep 14 to 15 hours each day—11 to 12 hours at night and three to four hours during the day spread out over four or five short naps. Some babies are able to sleep eight straight hours or more at night by 4 months, but the large majority don't. In fact, one to three night feedings are still considered very normal at this age. Learn your baby and discover what works best for your little one.

Be flexible

Your baby may be ready for a more by-the-clock sleep schedule at this age, but many aren't, so be flexible. You are still learning what works for you and your baby, so give yourself grace. Know that things will get better and the discomfort of the 4-month sleep regression is temporary.

Do what works for your family and trust yourself to know your baby better than any external authority.

Learn + Play
Motherly provides information of a general nature and is designed for educational purposes only. This site does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.Your use of the site indicates your agreement to be bound by our  Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Information on our advertising guidelines can be found here.