We’re so grateful that Amy Schumer became a mom.

She’s been refreshingly candid about her struggles with hyperemesis, IVF, and breast pumps. Now she’s got us in stitches with her take on screen time for toddlers.

“Every family has different rules and it’s all about what works for you. So, we decided to do no screen time at all for our son and just guide him more towards things like adorable books,” Schumer says in a video she posted to Instagram.


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Schumer, who shares 20-month-old son Gene with her husband, Chris Fischer, then holds up a copy of the children’s classic, Goodnight Moon, by Margaret Wise Brown.

“Yeah, so every family’s different but we just don’t believe in screen time,” she continues, while panning her camera to little Gene, who’s peacefully watching television.

“Gene, you want to read a book? A book, or…?” Schumer asks. But Gene is so content watching his show, he doesn’t even acknowledge his mom’s presence.

“I mean, we let him watch a lot of TV,” Schumer concludes.

We love the honesty!

Screen time for kids has been a hot topic for parents this week after the New York Times published a story about how screen time has “soared in the pandemic, alarming parents and researchers.”

Here’s the thing: we know screen time is up. Our kids are using screens for remote learning and to stay connected with friends and family. You know, amid a global pandemic.

Yes, they’re also watching their favorite movies and shows, and sometimes, Youtube videos of other kids playing with toys. What is that about, anyway?

Anyway, we know that screen time is up. We’re doing the best we can.

As Nicole Beurkens, Ph.D., previously wrote for Motherly, “The American Academy of Pediatrics issued a statement in March acknowledging, basically, that previous expectations around screen time may need to be adjusted given the new reality for so many families, and experts have suggested that the screen time metric to focus on is quality, not quantity.”

Try not to stress, mama. Do your best. And when you’re feeling stressed, know that you can always turn to Amy Schumer for a laugh.