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As a breastfeeding mother, the desire to share the realities of breastfeeding—the good, the bad, and the painful—led me to begin this project where I ventured into over 50 Boston-based families' homes and lives to document their typical breastfeeding routines. I'd strap my baby boy into a wrap (often nursing him while I photographed) and would talk with families about how breastfeeding fit into their lives. Below, you'll see the highlights of our days and will hear directly from the person in the picture about what breastfeeding means to them.

It was my overall goal that these photographs could empower families and make the barriers of breastfeeding more manageable. It is my hope that this project will continue to normalize breastfeeding and, in turn, help new parents feel more prepared, more informed and more supported throughout their breastfeeding journey.

As I began to nurse my second child, I found breastfeeding to be a great deal easier for me due to my experience with having already breastfed my older child, but also because of the confidence and support these families gave me. I am forever grateful to them and this body of work.

Monica, Marlin, 16 months and Simona, 3 years old

Gina Marie Brocker

Monica: "As I sit here multitasking at afternoon pick-up with my older daughter occupied and my baby Marlin happily suckling in my lap I realize that breastfeeding isn't always 'beautiful' in the aesthetic sense.

"What I love about it is the raw immediacy. A procrastinator and unplanner by nature, breastfeeding fits my lifestyle perfectly. Nothing to remember, nothing to clean just my ladies and my baby. It's not uncommon for me to have Marlin in the wrap or sling feeding while playing with big sister Simona at a playground or while running errands.

"Breastfeeding provides me with that sort of freedom and also empowerment. I don't think it was by mistake that God designed our bodies to be sufficient. When all is stripped away I am still enough for my babies and that is powerful. That feeling of empowerment is what continues to propel me through the unknowns and trials of parenthood with confidence."

To see more of Gina Marie Brocker's photographs from the series Latched On, please visit her website.

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As a mid-Spring holiday, we never knew exactly what to expect from the weather on Easter when I was growing up in Michigan: Would we get to wear our new Sunday dresses without coats? Or would we be hunting for eggs while wearing snowsuits?

Although what the temperature had in store was really anyone's guess, there were a few special traditions my sister and I could always depend on—and it won't come as a surprise to anyone who knows me that my favorite memories revolved around food. After all, experts say memories are strongest when they tie senses together, which certainly seems to be true when it comes to holiday meals that involve the sounds of laughter and the taste of amazing food.

Now that I'm a parent, I'm experiencing Easter anew as my children discover the small delights of chocolate, pre-church brunch and a multi-generational dinner. While I still look forward to the treats and feasting, I'm realizing now that the sweetest thing of all is how these traditions bring our family together around one table.

For us, the build-up to Easter eats is an extended event. Last year's prep work began weeks in advance when my 3-year-old and I sat down to plan the brunch menu, which involved the interesting suggestion of "green eggs and ham." When the big morning rolled around, his eyes grew to the size of Easter eggs out of pure joy when the dish was placed on the table.

This year, rather than letting the day come and go in a flash, we are creating traditions that span weeks and allow even the littlest members of the family to feel involved.

Still, as much as I love enlisting my children's help, I also relish the opportunity to create some magic of my own with their Easter baskets—even if the Easter Bunny gets the credit. This year, I'm excited to really personalize the baskets by getting an "adoptable" plush unicorn for my daughter and the Kinder Chocolate Mini Eggs that my son hasn't stopped talking about since seeing at the store. (You can bet this mama is stocking up on some for herself, too.)

At the same time, Easter as a parent has opened my eyes to how much effort can be required...

There is the selection of the right Easter outfits for picture-perfect moments.

There is the styling of custom Easter baskets.

There is the filling of plastic eggs and strategic placement of them throughout the yard.

But when the cameras are put away and we all join together around the table for the family dinner at the end of the day, I can finally take a deep breath and really enjoy—especially with the knowledge that doing the dishes is my husband's job.

This article was sponsored by Kinder. Thank you for supporting the brands that support Motherly and mamas.


Our Partners

This is a trying time for all parents as schools are closed nationwide to protect children, teachers and families from coronavirus. As a special education teacher for 17 years, this is new territory for me as well. I get daily emails from my supervisors and district leaders on what to expect and what is happening, and I'm keeping in touch with all my parents, too. Luckily, I have great parents to work with and I want to support them and my students as best as I can.

Here is my advice on 5 things parents of special needs children can do to help your child through a school closure.

1. Get + read the most recent IEP for your child.

In the Individual Education Plan there are two key items you should be aware of:

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Goals: You and the teacher of record as well as any service provider should have worked together on goals for your child. These are important guides for what you can be doing with your child at home.

For instance, if one of the goals was to learn about reading a clock and understanding elapsed time, that could be a skill you can work with at home. If a goal was for your child to pick from a field of three options for a cause/effect reaction, have your child pick lunch from three options. I know there are many different abilities, so there are going to be many different goals. Focusing on your child's goals in their IEP can make it easier to decide what you want to teach and review with your child.

Provisions: Be aware of what services your child usually gets and how often as part of their IEP, such as speech therapy, occupational therapy or physical therapy. Depending on where you live and how the decision to close school was made, your school district may have to compensate for these lost services.

If your school district is closed by government order the school district will not have to compensate for that lost time (or for any time covered by already-scheduled school vacation days). It is only when a school district has closed by their own decision without permission to waive the school day, while still providing education services for the general-education population that special education services would have to be counted in the provisions.

2. Ask for a basic daily schedule.

Contact your teacher of record to ask for a basic daily schedule. You are not required to follow it completely, but students like consistency. If you can create a schedule with some pieces of what your child was used to, it will be helpful. Everyone can do some kind of calendar time, math center time or reading time. Work with what you have at home.

3. Explain the disruption with care.

If your child is asking every day, "is it time for school?" or is starting to have meltdowns because they're not on their usual schedule, think about what you can say to your child that meets them where they are. If they can understand school is closed because of a sickness, then share that, and use a calendar to show how many days you have been staying home. If your child is confused and unable to process, tell them the school is on a break. Focus on talking about what the experience of having an extended break from school is like, instead of trying to explain contagious disease and social distancing.

4. Lower your expectations.

This is an extremely stressful time for all Americans—parents and kids. Your family's focus should be on staying safe and healthy. If you don't have every assignment done, if your child spends more time on a screen than usual, believe me, it's fine. There may be regression, and there will be less progress than you wish, but your child will be safe from getting sick and you will be safe from fearing for your child's health.

5. Use the resources in your community.

It's inspiring to see how many communities and organizations have rallied to offer support and resources. Many school districts are offering food pickups, online educational platforms are offering free programming, and across the country, community shelters and services are ramping up to help people. Use your school's website for information about your child's school and to learn what plans are being put into place to deal with closures. The PTAs at many schools have online groups on Facebook, Konstella or other digital community apps where parents are connecting and sharing information, including ways to support your school and community.

Stay safe and healthy. Enjoy the time you have with your child and family. We'll see you when the schools reopen—and we'll greet your kids with the biggest smiles.

Learn + Play

Does the coronavirus outbreak have you in the mood for fresh movies and tv shows? Of course, we love our go-to Netflix and Hulu favorites, but sometimes we just need a change, right?

While there's a healthy stream of shows and movies leaving (gosh, we were really hoping My Best Friend's Wedding could stay a bit longer), there's a bevy of new material to dive into, including new seasons of 90 Day Fiancé: Happily Ever After and Insecure. Below, see the full lineup of what's coming and leaving from Netflix, Hulu and HBO in April.

Here are all the TV shows + movies coming to Netflix in April:



April 1

David Batra: Elefanten I Rummet

How to Fix a Drug Scandal

The Iliza Shlesinger Sketch Show

Nailed It!: Season 4

Sunderland 'Til I Die: Season 2

40 Days and 40 Nights

Bloodsport

Cadillac Records

Can't Hardly Wait

Cheech & Chong's Up in Smoke

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Community: Season 1-6

Deep Impact

God's Not Dead

Just Friends

Killer Klowns from Outer Space

Kim's Convenience: Season 4

Lethal Weapon

Lethal Weapon 2

Lethal Weapon 3

Lethal Weapon 4

Minority Report

Molly's Game

Mortal Kombat

Mud

Pokémon the Series: Sun & Moon: S3: Sun & Moon – Ultra Legends

Promised Land

Road to Perdition

Salt

School Daze

Sherlock Holmes

Soul Plane

Sunrise in Heaven

Taxi Driver

The Death of Stalin

The Girl with All the Gifts

The Hangover

The Matrix

The Matrix Reloaded

The Matrix Revolutions

The Perks of Being a Wallflower

The Roommate

The Runaways

The Social Network

Wildling

April 2

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Violet Evergarden: Eternity and the Auto Memory Doll

April 3

Coffee & Kareem

La casa de papel: Part 4

Money Heist: The Phenomenon

Spirit Riding Free: Riding Academy

StarBeam

April 4

Angel Has Fallen

April 5

The Killing of a Sacred Deer

April 6

The Big Show Show

April 9

Hi Score Girl: Season 2

April 10

Here are all the TV shows + movies coming to Hulu in April:

April 1

Kabukicho Sherlock: Complete Season 1

60 Days In: Narcoland: Complete Season 1

90 Day Fiance: Happily Ever After?: Complete Season 4

Alone: Complete Season 6

Breaking Amish: Complete Seasons 2 + 3

Bring It!: Complete Season 5

Chopped: Complete Season 36

Cutthroat Kitchen: Complete Season 12

Dance Moms: Complete Seasons 2 + 6

Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives: Complete Seasons 27 – 29

Dr. Pimple Popper: Complete Season 3

Fast N' Loud: Complete Season 13

Fixer Upper (How We Got to Here: Looking Back on Fixer Upper): Special

Forged in Fire: Complete Season 6

Gold Medal Families: Complete Season 1

Hidden Potential: Complete Season 1

House Hunters: Complete Season 120

Kids Behind Bars: Life or Parole: Complete Season 1

Little Women: Atlanta: Complete Season 5

Little Women: L.A.: Complete Seasons 7 + 8

Love It or List It: Complete Season 14

Married at First Sight: Complete Season 9

Marrying Millions: Complete Season 1

Property Brothers: Complete Seasons 10 + 11

Taken at Birth: Complete Season 1

The Family Chantel: Complete Season 1

The Food That Built America: Complete Season 1

The Kitchen: Complete Seasons 16 – 18

Til Death Do Us Part: Complete Season 1

TRANsitioning: Complete Season 1

The Ant Bully

Bangkok Dangerous

Bend It Like Beckham

Blazing Saddles

The Book Of Eli

The Boost

The Chumscrubber

Diary of a Hitman

Dr. Seuss' Horton Hears a Who

Dr. T. and the Women

The Eternal

Free Birds

The Full Monty

Fun in Acapulco

Gator

Get Smart

Gods and Monsters

Gorky Park

Hud

Kill Bill: Volume 1

Kill Bill: Volume 2

The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen

Let Me In

Madagascar: Escape 2 Africa

The Mexican

Misery

Moll Flanders

Phone Booth

Repentance

Risky Business

Romancing the Stone

The Jewel of the Nile

The Sender

Shirley Valen

Trapped: The Alex Cooper Story

Victoria Gotti: My Father's Daughter

Who Let The Dogs Out

The X-Files: I Want to Believe

Zombieland

April 3

Future Man: Complete Final Season

Siren: Season 3 Premiere

April 6

Too Cautious Hero: Complete Season 1

April 7

No Guns Life: Complete Season 1

April 8

Parasite

April 9

Who Wants to be a Millionaire?

Kono Oto Tomare!: Sounds of Life: Complete Season 2a

Little Joe

April 10

Real Housewives of Potomac: Complete Season 4

April 12

My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic: Complete Season 9B

My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic en Español: Complete Season 9B

April 14

The Bachelor: Listen to Your Heart

The Baker and the Beauty

Songland: Season 2 Premiere

Vault

Unlocked

April 15

Mrs. America: Series Premiere

The Masked Singer: Sing-Along Spectacular: Special

A Teacher

The Messenger

April 16

What We Do In The Shadows: Season 2

Harry Benson: Shoot First

April 20

Paranormal Activity 3

A Kind of Murder

April 22

Special-7: Complete Season 1

April 23

Cunningham

April 24

Abominable

April 29

Footloose


Here are all the TV shows + movies coming to HBO in April:


April 1

Alpha and Omega

Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked

American Pie

American Pie 2

American Wedding

Becoming Jane

Clockstoppers

Daylight

Die Hard

Die Hard 2

Die Hard with a Vengeance

Drop Dead Fred

The Family Stone

The Flintstones

The Flintstones in Viva Rock Vegas

Glee: The 3D Concert Movie (Extended Version)

The Great Gilly Hopkins

Home Alone 2: Lost in New York

The Judge

The Kids Are All Right

The Lovely Bones

Loving

Monte Carlo

The Nice Guys

The Pacifier

The Predator

Slumdog Millionaire

Something Wild

Sophie's Choice

Team America: World Police

Ulee's Gold

War Dogs

Water for Elephants

Xanadu

X-Men

April 3

High Maintenance

April 5

Atlanta's Missing and Murdered: The Lost Children

April 12

Insecure: Season 4 Premiere

RUN

April 19

Entre Hombre

April 20

The Plot Against America: Series Finale

April 23

We're Here: Season Premiere

April 25

Bad Education

April 28

Autism: The Sequel

Here are the TV shows + movies leaving Netflix in April:



April 4

American Odyssey: Season 1

April 8

Movie 43

April 15

21 & Over

April 16

Lost Girl: Season 1-5

April 17

Big Fat Liar

April 19

The Longest Yard

April 24

The Ugly Truth

April 29

National Treasure

April 30

A Cinderella Story

A Little Princess

A Nightmare on Elm Street

Blade Runner: The Final Cut

The Craft

Crash

Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon

The Dirty Dozen

Dirty Harry

Driving Miss Daisy

Friday the 13th

Good Burger

GoodFellas

The Hangover

Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle

Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events

Police Academy

Police Academy 2: Their First Assignment

Police Academy 3: Back in TrainingPolice Academy 4: Citizens on Patrol

Police Academy 5: Assignment: Miami Beach

Police Academy 6: City Under Siege

Police Academy 7: Mission to Moscow

Rosemary's Baby

Rounders

Scream 2

Scream 3

The Shawshank Redemption

Space Jam

Spy Kids

Step Brothers

Strictly Ballroom

The Talented Mr. Ripley

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles

True Grit

Here are the TV shows + movies leaving Hulu in April:


My Best Friend's Wedding

American Buffalo

Cinderfella

Girls! Girls! Girls!

Golden Gate

The Bellboy

The Patsy

The Tenant

Unforgettable

Buffalo 66

Captain Kronos: Vampire Hunter

Still Smokin'

Earth Girls Are Easy

Judgment Day

Lord of War

National Lampoon's Dirty Movie

Here are the TV shows + movies leaving HBO in April:


Bruce Almighty
The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader

Cyborg

The Darkness

The Day After Tomorrow

George of the Jungle

Good Boy!

Hedwig and the Angry Inch

Homeward Bound II: Lost in San Francisco

Kit Kittredge: An American Girl

The Ladykillers

Mary Queen of Scots

Men of Honor

The Mule

Mr. Bean's Holiday

My Soul to Take

The Object of My Affection

Out of Sight

Puss in Boots

Religulous

Rush Hour 2

The Parallax View

Upgrade

Welcome to Marwen

Won't You Be My Neighbor?

Lifestyle

Kids are naturally super active on their own, of course but with no playgrounds, no physical education at school and canceled sports, it can be tough to get in daily movement.

Experts recommend that 1 to 4-year-olds need three hours of physical activity per day, and that older kids need movement, too—not just to have healthy bodies, but to make good grades. That's because physical education (PE) classes and sports practices do more than just get kids to run around—they reinforce a variety of important gross motor skills like balance, coordination, strength, flexibility and reflexes.

So does this mean you should feel obligated to set up a full PE curriculum for your child during this time? No! But anything that gets the kids moving and playing, and hopefully acting a little silly together, is a win right now.

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Here are some creative ideas to encourage physical activity beyond "go play outside"—including activities and exercises you can do together with kids.

Indoor movement ideas for kids

If you're having a bad weather week or you live in an urban area without easy access to a backyard, letting the kids run around outside might not be an option for you right now. But kids can still get in plenty of physical activity without leaving the house—it just takes a bit of creativity.

1. Twister
Twister is fun, encourages flexibility and balance, and is perfect for a rainy day or if you don't have an outdoor space available right now.

2. Dance + freeze
Adding a "freeze" element to a living room dance party makes it more fun for kids while also encouraging them to practice their balance.

3. Yoga
Practicing yoga together is a great way to challenge balance and coordination while also getting some much needed zen time as a family.

4. Beanbag toss
This super simple activity is great for kids of all different ages and abilities as you can easily make it more or less challenging. Set up two baskets, one full of beanbags or soft balls. Your child can practice throwing a beanbag from one basket to another to work on coordination. Move the baskets further apart as they get the hang of it.

5. Jump rope
Jump rope is the perfect indoor PE activity because it uses up so much energy, requires very little space and is excellent practice for coordination.

Outdoor movement ideas for kids

If you have outdoor space available, encourage your child to get out there and play as much as possible. Free play is excellent physical activity—and if you play alongside your child, you just may get some much needed endorphins. Kick a ball around the yard together, play catch or blow up that inflatable pool to splash around in as soon as it's warm enough.

Here are a few specific activities to try if your kid needs some inspiration to get out there, or if you want to work with them on gross motor skills.

1. Hopscotch
Hopscotch is excellent for helping kids improve balance and coordination because of all of the rapid changes in movement required. Get out the sidewalk chalk and set up hopscotch on your patio or driveway and hop along with each other.

2. Obstacle course
Enlist your child's help in setting up an obstacle course in the backyard. Get creative with what you have available to make it fun and challenging. Use garden stones or an old 2x4 to create a balance beam, mark a pathway for them to run or ride their bike on, set up a big bucket for them to throw a ball in.

If you don't have an outdoor space, you can still turn a playroom, garage, basement, or even your kid's bedroom into an obstacle course. Set up different stations like pillows for them to jump over, a row of chairs for them to crawl under, or a line made from painter's tape on the floor for them to walk or run on while balancing a beanbag on their head.

3. Foursquare
Sometimes the simple, time-tested games are the best! Draw numbered squares on your driveway and challenge each other to bounce the ball to a family member standing in whatever number square you call out. (You do need four people for a traditional foursquare game, but if you have fewer than four people in your household, you can create a simple variation by drawing a triangle or a rectangle with fewer spots.)

4. Follow the leader
Line up single file and let each family member take turns being the "leader." The leader decides how the group will move around the backyard. Think crawling around the perimeter, walking backwards (carefully), hopping on one foot, going down the slide if you have one.

5. Red light green light
Ask your kids to stand along the fence in the backyard. Stand across the yard from them. When you call "Green Light!" they can advance toward you and when you call "Red Light!" they stop. Change up the type of movement they use, from jumping to tiptoeing, and make sure to switch roles so they get a chance to lead too.

Learn + Play

The text I was waiting for came at 7:59 last night. And even though I've been bracing myself for it these past weeks, it still felt like a punch to the gut.

"Breaking: SCHOOL IS DISMISSED FOR THE 2019-2020 SCHOOL YEAR. Please see your email for a message from the superintendent."

In all caps, no less. As though the words themselves weren't overwhelming enough.

I suppose I had been clinging to some degree of hope telling me that normalcy was on the horizon. That if we could just buckle down for the month of April, gritting our teeth through the inevitable algebra related breakdowns (mine) and the "Can we watch whatever we want NOW?" demands (theirs) we'd all emerge victorious as the balm of warm weather arrived.

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Consider my hopes dashed.

Dropping my 8th grader off to his final middle school dance, the one I would have threatened to chaperone if he didn't clean his room–canceled.

Soccer, baseball, field day, end of year class trips–all canceled.

Recitals, concerts, proms, graduations–canceled as well.

I underestimated the grief I'd feel settling into this reality.

I'm grieving for the loss of these rites of passage that guide our kids so steadily into the next phase of their lives.

I'm grieving for the kids who won't have the opportunity to take the stage and revel in their accomplishments of years of hard work and dedication.

I'm deeply grieving for the kids who are trapped in homes with parents who wouldn't have attended anyway.

Last week, elbow-deep in a box of photos (a quarantine-induced jaunt down memory lane had been more appealing than cleaning) I stumbled upon a grainy photo dated 1996. There I stood in my best friend's basement, a dELIA*s catalog-clad 8th grader dancing awkwardly with the boy I'd been crushing on for all of middle school. Others in the background were casually crammed onto the couch wolfing down snacks and soda. While exact memories of the evening have long since faded, I can still palpably recall the hormone-laced thrills of those first moments you feel grown-up. Older. Ready to take on the world.

What I never gave thought to until now were the parents upstairs.

I didn't think about how they must have felt knowing their basement was a portal from one phase of childhood into the next, running down the clock on innocence. How they must have been completely gobsmacked by the fact that suddenly these kids they'd known since preschool would be high schoolers in just a few months.

I didn't know how incredible it is to get a glimpse of who your teenager is becoming as you observe them with their friends.

I was unaware they were likely as nervous as we were.

Now I'm the parent. And right now, it feels like we've been tasked with so much more than our parents were. If we've collectively learned anything these past weeks, it's that regular parents aren't cut out to be teachers. And as it turns out, we're not cut out to be our childrens' peers either.

For the foreseeable future, I won't have a basement full of kids navigating that transition together. I won't snap that goofy graduation photo of my son and his friends—one they'd look back on and laugh at for decades. I won't transport a car full of loud, exuberant teenagers to roam the mall (yes, they still do that) crossing my fingers they won't irritate the food court patrons too much.

I guess I'm grieving for myself a little in that regard, too.

Of course, I know there's light at the end of the tunnel. As we navigate our way through it, we'll make do with virtual hangouts and celebrations. We'll pretend not to notice when they're up a little late playing video games with their friends. We'll brave this new "normal" together and allow them to find new ways to socialize and test the boundaries of growing up.

Maybe one day, a quarter-century from now, they'll look back and remember not the things they missed out on, but the ways they cultivated resilience while coming of age in a brand new era.

Life
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