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6 ways to grow your marriage before baby arrives

Parenthood will stretch and grow you in brand new ways. Get started now to prep for the incredible journey ahead. ?

6 ways to grow your marriage before baby arrives

There’s a lot you can do on the journey to parenthood to be as prepped as possible.


Here are 6 of our favorite ways to grow stronger as a couple before baby arrives—


1. Find your comfort zone

He loves Saturday morning runs together.

She adores Thursday night date nights at the downtown bar.

Whatever makes you happy as a couple, own it. Parenthood can come as a shock to the system, so the more that you can know how to find your happy place together, the easier it will be to find it once baby arrives.

2. Build those memories

Somewhere a few months, or years from now, you’ll lay in bed while your little one snoozes nearby. Happily trapped by the demands of parenthood, you’ll reminisce about life before kids—how it is was freer, and yet not necessarily fuller.

You’ll also remember the fun you had before kids—and will fondly fall back on these memories during rough patches.

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So build your memories now. Live outside the box. Take risks together. Travel. They’re laying the foundation for a family.

3. Learn how to handle stress—together

Maybe he needs to talk things out. Maybe she needs alone time to find her inner peace.

Use this time before baby arrives to learn how you handle challenges in your own unique ways, and how to support your partner when he or she is going through a tough time.

4. Get on the same page

Credit scores.

Budgets.

Wills.

They’re not the fun topics in any relationship, but getting on the same page about the big stuff will help relieve stress down the line.

5. Create rituals

Whose family hosts Thanksgiving? Where do you go to worship? What’s your go-to celebratory dish?

You can think about borrowing from longstanding family traditions (hello Sunday dinners!) or create some traditions of your own.

Creating rituals and traditions before kids arrive both builds your bond, and strengthens your family’s story on the journey to parenthood. It will mean even more down the line to include your little one in them.

6. Encourage growth

Maybe your partner is ready to really get in shape—or you’re ready to push your career into high gear.

Encourage your partner to grow in new ways now, and consider how your own actions and behavior can help accelerate or thwart success.

Parenthood will stretch and grow you in brand new ways. Get started now to prep for the incredible journey ahead. ?

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I felt lost as a new mother, but babywearing helped me find myself again

I wish someone had told me before how special wearing your baby can be, even when you have no idea how to do it.

My first baby and I were alone in our Brooklyn apartment during a particularly cold spring with yet another day of no plans. My husband was back at work after a mere three weeks of parental leave (what a joke!) and all my friends were busy with their childless lives—which kept them too busy to stop by or check in (making me, at times, feel jealous).

It was another day in which I would wait for baby to fall asleep for nap number one so I could shower and get ready to attempt to get out of the house together to do something, anything really, so I wouldn't feel the walls of the apartment close in on me by the time the second nap rolled around. I would pack all the diapers and toys and pacifiers and pump and bottles into a ginormous stroller that was already too heavy to push without a baby in it .

Then I would spend so much time figuring out where we could go with said stroller, because I wanted to avoid places with steps or narrow doors (I couldn't lift the stroller by myself and I was too embarrassed to ask strangers for help—also hi, New Yorkers, please help new moms when you see them huffing and puffing up the subway stairs, okay?). Then I would obsess about the weather, was it too cold to bring the baby out? And by the time I thought I had our adventure planned, the baby would wake up, I would still be in my PJs and it was time to pump yet again.

Slowly, but surely, and mostly thanks to sleep deprivation and isolation, I began to detest this whole new mom life. I've always been a social butterfly. I moved to New York because I craved that non-stop energy the city has and in the years before having my baby I amassed new friends I made through my daily adventures. I would never stop. I would walk everywhere just to take in the scenery and was always on the move.

Now I had this ball and chain attached to me, I thought, that didn't even allow me to make it out of the door to walk the dog. This sucks, I would think regularly, followed by maybe I'm not meant to be a mom after all.


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There is rightfully a lot of emphasis on preparing for the arrival of a new baby. The clothes! The nursery furniture! The gear! But, the thing about a baby registry is, well, your kids will keep on growing. Before you know it, they'll have new needs—and you'll probably have to foot the bill for the products yourself.

Thankfully, you don't have to break the bank when shopping for toddler products. Here are our favorite high-quality, budget-friendly finds to help with everything from meal time to bath time for the toddler set.

Comforts Fruit Crisps Variety Pack

Comforts fruit snacks

If there is one thing to know about toddlers, it is this: They love snacks. Keeping a variety on hand is easy when the pack already comes that way! Plus, we sure do appreciate that freeze-dried fruit is a healthier alternative to fruit snacks.

Comforts Electrolyte Drink

Comforts electrolyte drink

Between running (or toddling!) around all day and potentially developing a pickier palate, many toddlers can use a bit of extra help with replenishing their electrolytes—especially after they've experienced a tummy bug. We suggest keeping an electrolyte drink on hand.

Comforts Training Pants

Comforts training pants

When the time comes to start potty training, it sure helps to have some training pants on hand. If they didn't make it to the potty in time, these can help them learn their body's cues.

Comforts Nite Pants

comforts nite pants

Even when your toddler gets the hang of using the toilet during the day, nighttime training typically takes several months longer than day-time training. In the meantime, nite pants will still help them feel like the growing, big kid they are.

Comforts Baby Lotion

comforts baby lotion

Running, jumping, playing in sand, splashing in water—the daily life of a toddler can definitely irritate their skin! Help put a protective barrier between their delicate skin and the things they come into contact with every day with nourishing lotion.

Another great tip? Shopping the Comforts line on Comfortsforbaby.com to find premium baby products for a fraction of competitors' prices—and follow along on social media to see product releases and news at @comfortsforbaby.

This article was sponsored by The Kroger Co. Thank you for supporting the brands that support Motherly and mamas.

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Errands and showers are not self-care for moms

Thinking they are is what's burning moms out.

A friend and I bump into each other at Target nearly every time we go. We don't pre-plan this; we must just be on the same paper towel use cycle or something. Really, I think there was a stretch where I saw her at Target five times in a row.

We've turned it into a bit of a running joke. "Yeah," I say sarcastically, "We needed paper towels so you know, I had to come to Target… for two hours of alone time."

She'll laugh and reply, "Oh yes, we were out of… um… paper clips. So here I am, shopping without the kids. Heaven!"

Now don't get me wrong. I adore my trips to Target (and based on the fullness of my cart when I leave, I am pretty sure Target adores my trips there, too).

But my little running joke with my friend is actually a big problem. Because why is the absence of paper towels the thing that prompts me to get a break? And why on earth is buying paper towels considered a break for moms?

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