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The ultimate Father’s Day gift guide—something for every man

Father’s Day is almost here, and we want to celebrate our amazing baby daddies in the best way possible—getting him something unique, awesome, and (let’s be real) probably covered in bacon.


For all the diaper changes, encouraging texts when your daughter will not get dressed and you’re running (very) late, that awesome pep talk on your first day back to work after maternity leave, and everything in between—we want to shout it from the rooftops—you ROCK.

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We found the best gifts for every kind of dad out there—from the dapper dad, to the grill master, and everything in between—we’ve got you covered, mama.

Here’s our ultimate Father’s Day gift guide to show your man what a wonderful dad you think he is, whatever his style—

1. For the everyman

Man Crates

These awesome crates are filled to the brim with everything from hot sauce to coffee percolators, depending on which specialty you choose. Bonus—they come with a crowbar to crack them open. Let’s just say, he will be impressed.

Bacon of the month club

Could you imagine a new type of bacon delivered to your door every month? Talk about a gift for yourself, too. (They also have many other monthly clubs—everything from chocolate to hot sauce to olive oil club, and more.)

2. The cool dad

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Personalized cornhole set

The game of cornhol (baggo, bean bag toss) has really picked up steam the last couple of years. If you’re at a fun BBQ (and even some weddings), you’re pretty much guaranteed to see a cornhole setup in the backyard. This is a staple for keeping the cool dad’s social game on point.

Beardition beard grooming kit

Hook your baby daddy up with some all-natural, aloe vera based products that are safe and feel smooth. These products are made in the USA, and do not discriminate on size of beard or fullness.

3. The cocktail connoisseur

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Lagavulin

Abottle of Lagavulin, a smoky single malt scotch, would make Ron Swanson and your husband proud. So, #treatyoself, pops.

Whiskey and rum kit

Bourbon, rum, or whiskey get better with age (just like the two of you), so let him customize his own spirits to his liking with this DIY kit. He’ll think you’re as smooth as Tennessee whiskey. Well, because, you are.

Cocktail shaker

Every James bond knows you can’t stir a martini. You must shake it. Gift him his own cocktail shaker and he’ll be feeling as suave as 007 in no time.

4. The dapper dad

Trunk club gift card

You Stitch Fix or Le Tote, he Trunk Clubs. Everyone deserves to look stylin’, and it’s not as easy to shop for ourselves during these busy days. A gift card to a personal stylist service is thoughtful and helpful.

Father + son matching swimsuits


Is there anything cuter than seeing your mini-man wearing the same bathing suit as his proud papa? We’re not sure there is. Tom & Teddy suits are what preppy dad’s dreams are made of.

5. The nerd

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Star Wars tee shirt

A shirt that proudly proclaims “best dad in the Galaxy” would impress even the most advanced Jedi’s. May the force be with you this Father’s Day.


Cassette tape pen holder

This throwback to mixed tape days of yore is the perfect office accessory. Only downfall is that you’ll want to take it apart so you can pop it in for a listen...but it’s too cute to break.

5. The foodie


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Homemade bacon kit

Sure he’s eaten his fair share of delicious bacon, but has he ever cured his own? The satisfaction of curing your own bacon is high, so expect excitement levels to match.

Charcuterie board

Every foodie needs one. You choose the wood and how you want it customized, and he chooses the meat and cheese selection. Bon appétit!

6. The eco dad

CSA membership


Use this directory to locate a CSA near you. It’ll tell you which farms in the area offer a CSA (community supported agriculture) share, and the specifics that go along with it. CSA shares offer delicious in-season fruits and vegetables (and sometimes meat and dairy) either to your doorstep or for pickup that’ll keep your family happy and healthy all season long.

Compost

This tumbler compost aerates easily and you only have to rotate it once a week, or after every addition. It’s low maintenence, and will have fresh compost in just 14 days. Reducing waste in our world is so important, your eco man will appreciate it.

6. The music man

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Bose wireless headphones

If your husband commutes to work, likes to listen to podcasts, watch movies on his laptop, or is a music buff—these are a no brainer for a successful Father’s Day gift choice. They are wireless which is quite frankly, life changing.

USB turntable

For the record loving pops, this USB turntable is revolutionary. It’s compact so you can bring it anywhere you go, and it’s analog-to-digital transfer feature makes converting your vinyls over to your phone (or other devices) seamless.

7. The traveller

Weekend bag


Herschel’s duffle is the perfect size for a weekend bag or even a gym bag. It’s practical, functional, yet still stylish and classy. Pair it with a weekend trip—just the two of you—and you get super extra special gold stars.

Waterproof phone case

This case is amazing and (knock on wood) indestructible. It “exceeds Military Standards for protection” (um, so basically, exactly what toddler parents need?) and also provides more than 100% extra battery.

8. The practical papa

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A smart diaper bag

This helpful bag will keep dad organized on the go. It has twenty pockets to fit all your needs. Plus, it comes with a 7800mAh power bank which keeps your devices charged so you don’t have to worry about running low on battery, or the necessities.

A pocket blanket

These are cool and functional (always a great combo.) Extremely compact, waterproof, and perfect for a few people to sit on. Your baby daddy can bring this to the beach, camping, and concerts.

9. The writer

Line drawing space shuttle notebook

Super interesting an eye-catching design on front? Check. This will make writing notes down more fun to your husband, so he’ll never forget to pick up wine again. Right?

Dry erase notebook

This notebook is super easy to jot notes or reminders down, and doubles as an emergency keep-my-child-busy-and-happy toy for your little one. Win-win.

10. The grill master

Hot sauce pack

Allow him a break from his Sriracha bottle, and introduce the grill master to a four pack of hot sauce straight from Portland, Oregon. This pack comes with four 4oz bottles with flavors like red chili lime and smoked habanero barbeque (YUM.) He’s got hot sauce in his bag, #swag.

Meat: Everything you need to know cook book

Even the best grill master can learn a thing or two about the meat they’re cooking. This cook book covers seventy five beef, pork, lamb, veal, and poultry recipes for you to try out this grilling season.

11. The new dad

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One rad dad mug


Your man is rad—a rad husband, and a rad dad. Show your appreciation for the proud new papa with a mug that’ll serve a dual purpose—to serve up some liquid energy and put a smile on his face.

Morning, noon, and night coffee

New parenthood can leave you feeling more tired than you’ve ever felt in your life. You may even reach zombie status. So, caffeine please! This energetic trio will keep the new daddio feeling refreshed (okay, as refreshed as possible...) at any time of day.

Toddy cold brew coffee maker

Some days just call for iced coffee instead of hot. And on those days, the Toddy cold brew coffee maker is where it’s at—for iced coffee or iced tea. It also makes piping hot coffee (but no electricity required!)

12. The outdoorsman

Roo hammock

Adventure. Adrenaline. And...a place to sleep. This hammock can fit two people, and would be a super fun way to sleep on a camping trip or to take a break on a long hike. Just hook it up, hang out (literally), and then pack up quick and be on your way. Adventure awaits!

Classic vacuum pint glass

This glass is super useful for everyone from the seasoned outdoorsmen to the person who prefers glamping, if they must. It won’t rust, is BPA-free, and will keep a drink cold for up to 4.5 hours and a drink hot for 1.5 hours.

13. The athlete

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Wool running socks

These made-in-Vermont socks are lightweight, comfortable, and won’t slip or bunch (which is sooo annoying.) Merino wool will keep your feet cool in the summer and warm in the winter—which basically means it’s a magical fabric.

Football leather coasters

This set of four coasters are made of the same leather footballs are made from—so they are water resistant and durable. And will be awesome tailgating accessories this fall.

14. The classic pops

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Cigar sampler

Nicely presented, eight earthy-Cuban style cigars will make him feel as cool as Dean Martin and Sammy Davis Jr. Just stop him before he takes things into Tony Soprano territory.

Chillsner

The Chillsner will cool your beer in seconds and keep it that way the whole drink through. Never deal with a warm beer again.

15. The organizationally challenged dad

Planner


Simple, clean, and minimalistic. Planners are amazing and life-changing when it comes to organizing your time and to-do lists. So, if your man already likes to keep track of everything this way, he’ll appreciate this gift. And, if planning and organizing is something he needs a little help with, well then he will eventually appreciate this gift.

Docking station

This handmade bamboo docking and charging station provides an organized home for all those important items that somehow go missing when you need them most—keys, wallet, glasses, phone, pens, and more.

16. The DIY dad

‘You nailed it!’ craft

While dipping your child’s foot in paint may sound a little messy for you, fear not—this craft is easy, fun, and has a super cute outcome. See?

‘Yoda best dad’

Handmade cards are MUCH better than $5 store bought cards. So go for extra bonus points this Father’s Day—saving money by not buying a card, and bonus sentimental points for having your little one make them something awesome.

Breakfast in bed

Classic. Relaxing. Delicious. When in doubt, always assume breakfast in bed will put a smile on someone’s face. These recipes are no brainers.

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Starting your child on solids can be a daunting process. Between the mixed advice that seems to come from every angle ("Thanks, Grandma, but pretty sure one dessert is enough…") to the at-times picky palates of our little ones, it can be tough on a mama trying to raise a kid with a sophisticated palate.

But raising an adventurous eater doesn't have to be a chore. In partnership with our friends at Raised Real, here are eight tips to naturally encourage your child to nibble and taste with courage.

1. Keep an open mind. 

As the parent, you set the tone for every bite. So stay positive! Raised Real makes it easy to work new and exciting ingredients into every meal, so you'll have plenty of opportunities to practice modeling open-minded eating. Instead of saying, "You might not like this" or "It's okay if you don't like it" from the start, keep your tone upbeat—or simply serve new dishes without any fanfare at all. (Toddlers can smell a tough sell from a mile away.) Either way, let your child decide for themselves how they feel about new dishes.

2. Show mealtime some respect. 

Spend less time in the kitchen and more time together at the table with Raised Real meals, which come prepped and ready to steam and blend. They're even delivered to your door—because they know how busy you are, mama. Think about it: Do you enjoy a meal you've had to rush through? Keep meals relaxed and let your child savor and taste one bite at a time to take any potential anxiety out of the equation. (This may mean you need to set aside more time than you think for dinner.)

3. Serve the same (vibrant) dish to the whole family.

Don't fall into the "short-order cook" trap. Instead of cooking a different meal for every family member, serve one dish that everyone can enjoy. Seeing his parents eating a dish can be a simple way to encourage your little one to take a bite, even if he's never tried it before. Since Raised Real meals are made with real, whole ingredients, they can be the perfect inspiration for a meal you serve to the whole family.

4. Get kids involved in prepping the meal.

Raised Real's ingredients are simple to prepare, meaning even little hands can help with steaming and blending. When children help you cook, they feel more ownership over the food—and less like they're being forced into eating something unfamiliar. As they grow, have your children help with washing and stirring, while bigger kids can peel, season, and even chop with supervision. Oftentimes, they'll be so proud of what they've made they won't be able to wait to try it.

5. Minimize snacking and calorie-laden drinks before meals. 

Serving a new ingredient? Skip the snacks. Hungry kids are less picky kids, so make sure they're not coming to the table full when you're introducing a new flavor. It's also a good idea to serve in courses and start with the unfamiliar food when they're hungriest to temper any potential resistance.

6. Don’t be afraid to introduce seasoning!  

Raised Real meals come with fresh seasonings already added in so you can easily turn up the flavor. Cinnamon, basil, turmeric, and cumin are all great flavors to pique the palate from an early age, and adding a dash or two to your recipes can spice up an otherwise simple dish.

7. Make “just one bite” the goal. 

Don't stress if your toddler isn't cleaning their plate—if he's hungry, he'll eat. Raised Real meals are designed to train the palate, so even a bite or two can get the job done. Right now the most important thing is to broaden their horizons with new flavors.

8. Try and try and try again. 

Kids won't always like things the first time. (It can take up to 20 tries!) If your child turns up her nose at tikka masala the first time, that doesn't mean she'll never care for Indian food. So don't worry. And be sure to try every ingredient again another day—or the next time you get it in your Raised Real meal box!

Still not sure where to start? Raised Real takes the guesswork out of introducing a variety of solids by delivering dietician-designed, professionally prepped ingredients you simply steam, blend, and serve (or skip the blending for toddlers who are ready for finger foods)—that's why they're our favorite healthy meal hack for kids.

Raising an adventurous eating just got a whole lot simpler, mama.

This article is sponsored by Raised Real. Thank you for supporting the brands that support Motherly and mamas.

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I wasn't supposed to be a stay-at-home mom.

Or, to put it another way, I wasn't supposed to be a year-round, stay-at-home mom. My husband and I live in Los Angeles, and our rent and monthly bills require two paychecks.

By the time our son Ryan was born, I had been teaching for seven years. And there was no question that I'd continue to teach. Other teacher-moms told me that teaching was the "perfect" career for parents.

"Once he starts school, you and your son will have the same hours each day."

"You'll always be available when he's got a random day off from school."

"You'll spend vacations together."

"You know what your schedule is year-round. It's not like other jobs, where your schedule changes on a weekly basis."

Like my husband's schedule. Paul's retail career didn't provide the same consistent schedule, week after week, that my teaching career did. While Paul's schedule could be erratic, I would provide Ryan with a reliable, fixed routine.

And my colleagues were right.

Aside from a few exceptions, such as Parent-Teacher Conferences and Back-to-School Night, Ryan and I would have dinner together each night. I imagined us doing "homework" together each afternoon—Ryan doing actual homework, me grading my students' homework.

Because there are 180 school days, theoretically, that means that the other half of the year, I'd spend with Ryan. But again, there were some exceptions. I usually spent quite a bit of time each summer attending conferences, workshops, and professional developments. I always returned to my classroom several days before the start of the new school year to get everything ready.

Still, teaching would continue to provide our family with a needed second income, feed my passion for teaching, and allow me the opportunity to spend considerable time with my son each day, all year long.

If Ryan attended the same small, local elementary school where I taught, I'd never have to choose between my students and my son. We'd come and go to school together, I'd watch him walk with his class in our school's Halloween Parade, and he'd watch me walk with mine. I'd hear him and his class sing holiday songs during our winter performance, and he'd hear my class.

That was the plan.

But while Ryan was a preschooler, the plan changed.

I got sick with a "mystery illness" that took doctors almost a year and a half to diagnose. Eventually, my rheumatologist determined I suffered from Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease, an autoimmune disease. I tried to pretend that my disease didn't impact my life or require any major lifestyle changes. But I couldn't keep up the pretense. So, in 2013, after a 12-year teaching career, I retired due to a disability.

I wasn't merely forced to give up my career. I had to give up my passion. I was now thrust into the role of year-round, stay-at-home mom, and I wasn't completely sure how to do it.

Thankfully, my disability check would continue to provide us with some income and the matching schedules Ryan had grown accustomed to would continue as well. But there were a lot of changes.

I had never before been the person to take Ryan to preschool. That job had always fallen to either our nanny or Paul. Now, I had to learn the timetable for breakfast, and the morning routine of getting washed, dressed, and out of the house.

I also had to figure out what to do after preschool. When I was teaching, I came home in the late afternoon. Ryan and I had some play time and shortly after that, we would begin our nightly evening routine. Now, with preschool ending at two o'clock each afternoon, we would have hours together before it was time for dinner.

How would I fill that time?

I knew how to lesson plan for a class of 30-plus students. I knew how to fill school days with a mix of whole-group instruction, independent work, and cooperative group work. I had a pacing plan to adhere to, standards and concepts that I was mandated to teach on a

timetable to prepare my students for periodic assessments and yearly standardized testing. But how would I organize a single day that involved just Ryan and me?

Many colleagues told me to find the silver lining. I had a disability, but I had also been given a gift—the opportunity to be a full-time, stay-at-home mom. While that was true, it came at a price.

I felt confused because I wasn't accepting my new role with complete enthusiasm and pure delight. I alternated between feelings of guilt, anger, and frustration because it wasn't my choice. My doctor and the state of California told me I could no longer teach. And when someone tells you that you can or cannot do something, it means something entirely different than when the choice is your own.

While I love my son and am honored to be his mother, I didn't know how to reconcile the fact that mothering had now become my primary job every day. I wasn't sure how to accept and make sense of my new identity. Disabled woman. Former Teacher. Stay-at-home mom.

I've slowly come to realize that I'm still a teacher, but now my student roster consists of one, my son, and my classroom isn't always a room. Sometimes it's the library. Sometimes it's our kitchen. Sometimes it's our backyard.

Sometimes it's enough. Sometimes it isn't. But it is always an adventure.

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In the moments after we give birth, we desperately want to hear our baby cry. In the middle of the night a few months later it's no longer exactly music to our ears, but those cries aren't just telling us that baby needs a night feeding: They're also giving us a hint at what our children may sound like as kindergarteners, and adults.

New research published in the journal Biology Letters suggests the pitch of a 4-month-old's cry predicts the pitch they'll use to ask for more cookies at age five and maybe even later on as adults.

The study saw 2 to 5-month olds recorded while crying. Five years later, the researchers hit record again and chatted with the now speaking children. Their findings, combined with previous work on the subject, suggest it's possible to figure out what a baby's voice will sound like later in life, and that the pitch of our adult voices may be traceable back to the time we spend in utero. Further studies are needed, but scientists are very interested in how factors before birth can impact decades later.

"In utero, you have a lot of different things that can alter and impact your life — not only as a baby, but also at an adult stage," one of the authors of the study, Nicolas Mathevon, told the New York Times.

The New York Times also spoke with Carolyn Hodges, an assistant professor of anthropology at Boston University who was not involved in the study. According to Hodges, while voice pitch may not seem like a big deal, it impacts how we perceive people in very real ways.

Voice pitch is a factor in how attractive we think people are, how trustworthy. But why we find certain pitches more or less appealing isn't known. "There aren't many studies that address these questions, so that makes this research especially intriguing," Hodges said, adding that it "suggests that individual differences in voice pitch may have their origins very, very early in development."

So the pitch of that midnight cry may have been determined months ago, and it may determine part of your child's future, too. There are still so many things we don't know, but as parents we do know one thing: Our babies cries (as much as we don't want to hear them all the time) really are something special.

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Jessica Simpson will soon join the mom of three club! The singer-turned-fashion mogul announced on Instagram today that she is expecting a baby girl.

"This little baby girl will make us a family of five," said Simpson, who shares 6-year-old Maxwell and 5-year-old Ace with husband Eric Johnson. "We couldn't be happier to announce this precious blessing of life."

The news may come as a surprise to Simpson's fans, considering she's been pretty vocal about feeling as though her family was complete. "I have two beautiful children, and I'm not having a third," she told Ellen DeGeneres in 2017. "They're too cute. You can't top that."

Earlier this year, Simpson revealed to Entertainment Tonight she had developed a case of baby fever, but said it would "definitely have to be a miracle" to have a third baby. Today's joyful announcement is proof that plans can change and that's part of the fun of life. All that really matters is that Simpson's family—including the two big siblings—certainly seem excited.

Besides, the designer of a line for Motherhood Maternity shouldn't have any problem with being just as fashionable as ever through her third pregnancy. 😉

Congrats to the growing family!

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Pumpkin spice lattes are here and the weather is getting chillier. That can only mean one thing—Halloween is near! Whether you're a fan of the holiday or not, there's simply nothing more precious than dressing up your baby or toddler in an adorable costume.

Today only, Target has up to 40% off Halloween costumes for the entire family. We rounded up the cutest picks from the baby + toddler departments—check 'em out. 😍

Toddler Halloween Costumes: Shark

Shark costume, $15.00 (was $25.00)

BUY

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