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American Idol alum turned influencer Casey Goode's newborn tests positive for COVID-19

"Please send good energy to our little bub so he recovers fast."

Casey Goode's baby tests positive for COVID-19
Casey Goode (@officiallyquigley)/Instagram

This has been a really difficult year to welcome a baby, and no one understands this more than Casey Goode. The influencer and former American Idol contestant became a mama on September 18 when she and her husband welcomed their son, Maximilian Vaughn Goode, into the world.

Being pregnant during a pandemic is hard. Having your planned home birth moved to the hospital is hard. Having a complicated delivery is hard. Having an emergency episiotomy is hard. Seeing your baby in the NICU is hard. Goode went through all those things and now faces something so challenging most of us cannot even comprehend it: Her newborn baby, Max, was diagnosed with COVID-19 over the weekend.

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Goode announced the news on Instagram Sunday, explaining that little Max tested positive on Saturday morning and asking her hundreds of thousands of followers to "send good energy to our little bub so he recovers fast."



Baby Max spent eight days in the NICU after he was born, and when he started running a fever in the middle of the night his parents rushed him to the ER.

"We had confirmation that he was exposed from direct contact with a medical professional who had cared for him earlier in the week. This has been a total shock to us. I am currently quarantining with baby Max in the PICU," Goode explained in her Instagram post, adding that while she is showing no symptoms of COVID-19 the hospital staff are treating her as if she is positive because she has been exposed, too.

She addressed the uncertainty of the situation in the note to her fans and community, writing: "Not sure what happens next from here... but I expect to be offline for a while as we recover."

Our hearts are with Goode, her husband, Alex, and little Max right now.

The good news is Alex says he expects his wife and son to be discharged from the hospital very soon, perhaps as early as Monday. In a series of Instagram Stories on Sunday Alex explained that "mama and Max are doing well". In a caption, he wrote: "Max's fever has come down and he is doing much better. "

What mamas need to know about COVID-19 and newborns:

According to the Mayo Clinic, it is rare for babies to contract COVID-19, but when babies under a year old do they do appear to be at higher risk for a severe case.

The experts at the Mayo Clinic say "this is likely due to their immature immune systems and smaller airways, which make them more likely to develop breathing issues with respiratory virus infections."

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) notes that the current evidence suggests that it's uncommon for newborns to get COVID, and that when they do most "have either asymptomatic infections or mild disease" and recover.

The CDC explains: "Severe illness in neonates, including illness requiring mechanical ventilation, has been reported but appears to be rare. Neonates with underlying medical conditions and preterm infants (<37 weeks gestational age) may be at higher risk of severe illness from COVID-19."

While Max is at higher risk than other infants his age, he was born at 37 weeks, not before.

It's important to note that serious cases of COVID-19 in babies are very rare. That is an important point for everyone to know, but so is the fact that COVID-19 is real. In these trying times it was brave of Goode to share her story with the world and we hope the the world meets her with the empathy and compassion she deserves.

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    These challenges from Nike PLAYlist are exactly what my child needs to stay active

    Plus a fall family bucket list to keep everyone moving all season long.

    While it's hard to name anything that the pandemic hasn't affected, one thing that is constantly on my mind is how to keep my family active despite spending more time indoors. Normally, this time of year would be spent at dance and gymnastics lessons, meeting up with friends for games and field trips, and long afternoon playdates where we can all let off a little steam. Instead, we find ourselves inside more often than ever before—and facing down a long winter of a lot more of the same.

    I started to search for an outlet that would get my girls moving safely while we social distance, but at first I didn't find a lot of solutions. Online videos either weren't terribly engaging for my active kids, or the messaging wasn't as positive around the power of movement as I would like. Then I found the Nike PLAYlist.

    I always knew that Nike could get me moving, but I was so impressed to discover this simple resource for parents. PLAYlist is an episodic sports show on YouTube that's made for kids and designed to teach them the power of expressing themselves through movement. The enthusiastic kid hosts immediately captured my daughter's attention, and I love how the physical activity is organically incorporated in fun activities without ever being specifically called out as anything other than play. For example, this segment where the kids turn yoga into a game of Paper Scissors Rock? Totally genius. The challenges from #TheReplays even get my husband and me moving more when our daughter turns it into a friendly family competition. (Plus, I love the play-inspired sportswear made just for kids!)

    My daughter loves the simple Shake Ups at the beginning of the episode and is usually hopping off the couch to jump, dance and play within seconds. One of her favorites is this Sock Flinger Shake Up activity from the Nike PLAYlist that's easy for me to get in on too. Even after we've put away the tablet, the show inspires her to create her own challenges throughout the day.

    The best part? The episodes are all under 5 minutes, so they're easy to sprinkle throughout the day whenever we need to work out some wiggles (without adding a lot of screen time to our schedule).

    Whether you're looking for simple alternatives to P.E. and sports or simply need fun ways to help your child burn off energy after a day of socially distanced school, Nike's PLAYlist is a fun, kid-friendly way to get everyone moving.

    Need more movement inspiration for fall? Here are 5 ways my family is getting up and getting active this season:

    1. Go apple picking.

    Truly, it doesn't really feel like fall until we've picked our first apple. (Or had our first bite of apple cider donut!) Need to burn off that extra cinnamon-sugar energy? Declare a quick relay race up the orchard aisle—winner gets first to pick of apples at home.

    To wear: These Printed Training Tights are perfect for when even a casual walk turns into a race (and they help my daughter scurry up a branch for the big apples).

    2. Visit a pumpkin patch.

    We love to pick up a few locally grown pumpkins to decorate or cook with each year. Challenge your child to a "strongman" contest and see who can lift the heaviest pumpkin while you're there.

    To wear: Suit up your little one in comfort with this Baby Full Zip Coverall so you're ready for whatever adventures the day brings.

    3. Have a nature scavenger hunt.

    Scavenger hunts are one of my favorite ways to keep my daughter preoccupied all year long. We love to get outside and search for acorns, leaves and pinecones as part of our homeschool, but it's also just a great way to get her exercising those gross motor skills whenever the wiggles start to build up.

    To wear: It's not truly fall until you break out a hoodie. This cozy Therma Elite Kids Hoodie features a mesh overlay to release heat while your child plays.

    4. Have a touch-football game.

    Tip for parents with very little kids: It doesn't have to last as long as a real football game. 😂 In fact, staging our own mini-games is one of our favorite ways to get everyone up and moving in between quarters during Sunday football, and I promise we all sleep better that night.

    To wear: From impromptu games of tag to running through our favorite trails, these kids' Nike Air Zoom Speed running shoes are made to cover ground all season long.

    5. Create an indoor obstacle course.

    Pretending the floor is lava was just the beginning. See how elaborate your personal course can get, from jumping on the couch to rolling under the coffee table to hopping down the hallway on one foot.

    To wear: These ready-for-any-activity Dri-FIT Tempo Shorts are perfect for crawling, hopping and racing—and cuddling up when it's time to rest.

    This article was sponsored by Nike. Thank you for supporting the brands that supporting Motherly and mamas.

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