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Willow

The wearable Willow breast pump is setting moms free 🙌

When mom of two Nicole Phelps snapped a selfie showing her pumping at a formal event, hands-free, while wearing an evening gown, her Instagram notifications blew up. Among the clapping emojis and many variations on "YAAAAAASSSSS" there was one comment that came up again and again: "What pump is it? I want it!"

Over and over, @mrs.nicolephelps responded, letting Instagram followers know the tubeless, cordless, wearable pump she stuck into her evening gown is a Willow. Some commenters were familiar with the pump, which hit the market earlier this year, but for others, Phelps' selfie was the first they'd hear of the invention.

"There are wireless pumps??? 😱😱😱😱😱😱😱😱 love that idea!" wrote one commenter.

So did Time magazine. They called it one of the best inventions of 2017.

Willow's CEO, Naomi Kelman, was pleased by the reactions to Phelps selfie, not just because the picture spread the word about her product, but because the message Phelps was sending is the same one she preaches: Moms shouldn't have to drop what they're doing and go hide in a bathroom in order to pump.

"We see Willow as part of a larger effort to better the lives of women," Kelman tells Motherly. "Mothers told us that they wanted to be able to get their lives back."

The Willow's unique form factor frees moms from common issues that make pumping on the go difficult. It can be tucked into your existing bra and worn around, so you don't have to strip down the way moms have done in order to go hands-free with other pumps, and it doesn't need to be plugged in, so moms aren't left searching for an outlet (like the mom who recently went viral after she couldn't plug her pump in during a flight).

One mom commenting on Phelps' post recalled how she once found herself in "a bathroom in NYC sitting on the floor so I could access the power outlet" while using a traditional pump. Her expirience stands in contrast to another Instagram user, who's felt more freedom since using the Willow.

"I'm an RN (NICU RN) and I pump at work in the break room, running to get food and I've pumped while providing emergency care to one of my NICU babies," she commented on Phelps' selfie.

According to Kelman, stories like that aren't unique. She recalls hearing from a mom who is a dermatologist who pumped for her first child for nine months using a traditional pump. "She talked about the challenges of being pushed into supply closets even in a hospital," Kelman says.

The Willow changed things for that mom, according to Kelman, allowing her to pump while meeting with patients, and she was able to pump until 14 months with her second child.

The discrete wearability of the Willow is one reason moms are loving it, but the "smart" factors of this high-tech pump are also lauded in the comments section of Phelps' selfie. According to Kelman, the Willow app is different from apps for other pumps, because users don't have to go to the trouble of entering their own data, the Willow keeps track. The intuitive response of the Willow to a breast let down (going from stimulation mode to extraction mode) is another way the pump is "smart."

"I actually noticed an increase in overall volume with my @willowpump," one mom noted in Phelps' comment section. "I think some of it is being able to see the suction level with the app combined with being able to pump when I need to, not waiting a half hour till I could get to an outlet to plug in."

While plenty of moms chimed in on Phelps' Instagram post with praise for Willow, as Phelps herself noted, the pump is not without criticism and while she loves it, "It's not for everyone."

The pump is available in white and grey.

Willow

The most common complaint about the Willow pump is the price. At $479.99, it's at least $100 more than the Medela Freestyle double pump (which often retails for $379.99 but can currently be found on sale).

For some moms, having a pump that doesn't need a bunch of tiny (and easily forgettable) accessories, is well worth the extra investment, but Kelman understands that cost is a barrier. She says she is working hard on making Willow more accessible to more moms. "We're actively seeking to get insurance coverage because we recognize that that's super important and we want Willow to be available to all women," she tells Motherly, adding that the insurance companies' processes have been slower than the team at Willow would like.

"In the meantime, women can use insurance via their HSA or FSA account, and also we're finding that a lot of women are asking their insurance companies to cover as an out-of-network pump and are having huge success," says Kelman.

The Willow also can't be shipped internationally yet, but the team does hope to make it available in the future.

It took a long time for the world to get a breast pump like Willow, and it's probably going to take a little while longer for the world at large to get on board, but judging by the reaction to Phelps' instagram post, moms already are.

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When you become a mama, your definition of a smooth morning undergoes a complete evolution. Now, you consider it a win if your real alarm wakes you up and you get to drink coffee while it's still warm. The not-so-smooth mornings? Well, let's face it, that's a rough way to start the day.

When the wake-up call comes early and the coffee has been forgotten in the microwave, it may seem absolutely impossible to carve out any time for yourself. But a centered, confident mama is a happier mama, and there are some simple ways to sneak self-care into your morning to ensure you're putting your best face forward.

Specializing in quick, easy and (we must say) beautiful morning makeup routines, Woosh Beauty understands busy mornings, and has created an 'everything-in-one' makeup palette that is our new secret weapon for feeling like we made the effort to center ourselves, too.

Inspired by Woosh Beauty, here are five ways we've given our morning beauty routines a self-care makeover.

1. Make time (and space) for calm

As moms, time is priceless and that's especially true in the morning. Even if you're racing against the clock, it's worth it (trust us) to hit the pause button for just five minutes before tackling all the to-dos on your list.

With The Fold Out Face from Woosh Beauty, you have all the makeup you need (coverage and color) in one compact, portable palette. That means no scrambling to find your concealer. No opening, closing, then reopening and closing eyeshadows and powders.

Most importantly, no need to set up shop in front of your vanity/bathroom mirror/designated makeup space while keeping one eye on a constantly moving child. The Fold Out Face goes wherever you go and gives you everything you need in the flip of one flap—so you really can focus on yourself.

2. Create rituals that boost confidence

Even if you're going on your third day with the same yoga pants (they're so comfy!), it's important to make time in the morning to do something that will put a confident pep in your step.

While makeup has likely been part of your routine for years, motherhood can take a toll on your skin in new ways—which is why having 13 full-sized cosmetics, made from luxurious high-performing mineral-based formulas, allows you to erase the appearance of under-eye circles, perfect any imperfections and give yourself an effortless glow—all in less than five minutes.

So even if you don't have time to meticulously apply makeup, you can look and feel like you did. 😉

3. Allow our minds to drift 

For most of us, mornings mean going from zero to 60 in about five seconds flat. Before fully immersing yourself in the obligations of the day, it's nice to have just a few minutes to allow your mind to drift away from the to-do list. Woosh Beauty makes having mindspace while checking off "put on makeup" possible by numbering the order in which the cosmetics in The Fold Out Face should be applied.

4. Savor little luxuries

Before you go spend the morning driving kids around to the tune of nursery rhymes and eat a lunch of PB&J crusts, it can make a world of difference to your outlook to lavish in something that is all yours.

We love that Woosh Beauty makes that simple with The Essential Brush Set, a luxe collection of double-ended brushes that are numbered to correspond with the steps in the Fold Out Face, and come in a soft storage bag to keep them away from kids who may mistake them as paint brushes.

5. Be kinder to ourselves

Sometimes, a healthy self-voice for the rest of the day starts with rituals that remind us we're doing good for our bodies, too. By using Woosh Beauty products in your morning beauty routine, which are free of parabens, sulfates, gluten and fragrance—not to mention they are animal cruelty-free—you aren't just applying makeup, you're applying products and using tools that you can feel good about.

In the morning, a seemingly little thing like taking a few minutes for self-care is really a big thing that will continue to pay off with a beautiful outlook throughout the day—and with The Fold-Out Face from Woosh Beauty, it pays off with a beautiful look throughout the day, too.

Motherly readers can receive a 20% discount site wide using the code MOTHERLY at checkout.


This article was sponsored by Woosh Beauty. Thank you for supporting the brands that support Motherly and mamas.

As if new mamas don't have a steep enough learning curve already, one event takes most of us off-guard: that first postpartum period. After what was probably a hiatus of a year or longer, the return of your menstrual cycle isn't just back to business as usual. In most cases, it's initially less predictable and stronger than when Aunt Flo used to come calling.

The good news? By preparing yourself for what is to come, they don't have to be so intimidating — especially if you also stock your drawer with THINX underwear, made specifically to absorb menstrual flow. Every pair of THINX undies is created with their signature 4-layer technology that is super-absorbent, moisture-wicking, odor-fighting, and leak-resistant. Translation? You never have to worry about leaks or stains, even when your period is a surprise.

Here's the DL on those first postpartum periods:

1. When your period will return varies from woman to woman

The biggest factor that affects your period's return is whether or not you are breastfeeding. "If a woman is not breastfeeding, then the first menses usually returns at six weeks postpartum to three months postpartum," says Elizabeth Sauter, MD, Fellow of The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

Among exclusively breastfeeding mamas, Sauter says it can be harder to predict when menstruation will return in full force: It's rare for your period to return until at least six months postpartum (at which point you've probably introduced some solid food to baby's diet), but it may not return at all until you are done breastfeeding a year or more postpartum.

Before you get back to it, whenever that is, it can help to add some new undies from THINX, to your dresser drawer. We especially love the chic and practical Hi-Waist undies for postpartum—or any—bodies.

2. Your first postpartum period will probably be heavier than ever

Whenever your period does return, it will likely be in full force as it's not only the shedding of your uterine lining, but also the shedding of any clots or blood from the delivery process. (And you thought you got past that during the initial round of postpartum bleeding!)

While this can be a less-than-pleasant experience, Sauter says that many women eventually enjoy less painful and intense periods as they get farther away from baby's birth.

Because you are probably already getting up enough during the night, waking up to change a pad or tampon probably isn't high on your list of things you want to do. We love (like, love) that the most absorbent THINX undies can hold up to two tampons' worth of blood.

3. Your menstrual cycle may not be as easy to track

Again, whether or not you are exclusively breastfeeding has an impact on how reliable your period will likely be for the first year or so. As Sauter explains, mothers who had regular periods before pregnancy and do no breastfeed often fall back into that rhythm within a few months of baby's arrival.

For breastfeeding mamas, even once your period returns, it may not come back in exactly 28 days (or whatever frequency you were used to). However, for some women, this is a silver-lining.

"Many mothers who had irregular menses prepregnancy in fact start more regular menses postpartum," says Sauter, adding the disclaimer this isn't always the case, especially for women with polycystic ovarian syndrome.


Like everything motherhood, soon enough you will be right in the normal routine of life with a period again — only now, with period-proof underwear by THINX, you'll find it's easier than ever to take on your period with confidence.

This article was sponsored by THINX. Thank you for supporting the brands that support Motherly and mamas.

2018 will go down in history as the year that gave us a royal wedding, a second Chrissy Teiegn cookbook and saw Serena Williams prove that new mamas can do anything. It's also the year that a bunch of adorable celebrity babies came into the world.

Here's to all the celebrity babies born this year!

Elizabeth Smart and Matthew Gilmour welcomed baby Olivia

Back in June author and activist Elizabeth Smart announced she and husband Matthew Gilmour were expecting their third child, and in November baby Olivia arrived.

She was born in hospital and Smart shared a sweet post-birth selfie with her Instagram followers.

"So happy to welcome Olivia to our family!" she wrote.

We are so happy for her.

Jessica Chastain and Gian Luca Passi de Preposulo welcomed a baby girl

After actress Jessica Chastain was spotted out in October carrying a baby in a car seat, media outlets began to speculate about whether she and husband Gian Luca Passi de Preposulo had become parents, and it turns out the rumors are true. On November 19, E! News reported Chastain's daughter was born in the spring, via surrogate.

Chastain has not spoken publicly about her daughter or posted any baby photos on her Instagram, which is absolutely her choice. If she ever does decide to talk about the early days of her daughter's life, we will be all ears!

Until then, congratulations to Jessica and Gian!

Kate Upton and Justin Verlander welcomed daughter Genevieve

What a sweet little face! On November 10 Kate Upton and Justin Verlander introduced the world to their daughter, Genevieve Upton Verlander who was born on November 7.

On his Instagram account proud dad Verlander added notes "You stole my ❤️ the first second I met you!!!"

Looks like Genevieve's parents are very much in love with their baby girl.

Gabrielle Union and Dwyane Wade welcomed (a surprising) baby girl 

Gabrielle Union and Dwayne Wade shocked the world in November by announcing the birth of the daughter fans didn't know they were expecting!

"We are sleepless and delirious but so excited to share that our miracle baby arrived last night via surrogate and 11/7 will forever be etched in our hearts as the most loveliest of all the lovely days. Welcome to the party sweet girl!" Union, who has previously written about her struggles with infertility, wrote on Instagram.

Diane Kruger and Norman Reedus welcomed their first baby together

Diana Kruger and her partner, Walking Dead star Norman Reedus, are the latest celebrity parents to welcome a new baby, but unlike a lot of celebrity couples they did not do an Instagram baby announcement.

The family is keeping things low key, but People reports it has confirmed the baby's arrival.

Whether or not a family chooses to publicize their child's image and name is totally up to the parents, whether they are famous or not. Kruger and Reedus may choose to keep their baby out of the spotlight and that's totally cool. Big announcements aren't for everyone.

 Hilary Duff and Matthew Koma welcomed daughter Banks Violet Bair

Hilary Duff shared some big news in October, dropping an adorable birth announcement on Instagram and letting the world know that she had a home birth for daughter Banks Violet Bair. What a unique name!

Pippa Middleton and James Matthews welcomed a baby boy 

Little Prince Louis now has a close cousin! The Duchess of Cambridge's sister, Pippa Middleton, and her husband James Matthews welcomed a baby boy on October 16, one day after her sister's sister-in-law, Meghan Markle, announced her pregnancy.

Kate Hudson and Danny Fujikawa welcomed baby Rani Rose 

Kate Hudson is now a #girlmom.

The actress (who is also mom to sons, 7-year-old son Bingham and 14-year-old son Ryder) and her partner Danny Fujikawa announced the birth of their daughter one day after she was born on October 2. The birth announcement came via a series of Instagram slides, captioned with simply, "She's here".

"We have decided to name our daughter Rani (pronounced Ronnie) after her grandfather, Ron Fujikawa. Ron was the most special man who we all miss dearly. To name her after him is an honor," Hudson wrote.

"Everyone is doing well and happy as can be. Our family thanks you for all the love and blessings that have been sent our way and we send ours right back."

Jillian Harris and Justin Pasutto welcome baby Annie 

On October 1 Jillian Harris and Justin Pasutto announced they just welcomed their second child (and first girl), baby Annie. According to the Instagram post introducing Annie, Harris and Pasutto were enjoying a date night when Annie started making her entrance into the world, interrupting mom and dad's round of golf.

 Kim Kardashian +  Kanye West welcomed Chicago Noel West

Celebrity power couple Kim Kardashian and Kanye West welcomed their third child, baby Chicago via a gestational surrogate on January 15, 2018. Chicago came into the world weighing 7 pounds, 6 ounces and was instantly loved by the whole Kardashian family, including her siblings, North and Saint.

"We're so in love," Kardashian said in a statement released shortly after Chicago's birth.

"We are incredibly grateful to our surrogate who made our dreams come true with the greatest gift one could give," the proud mama explained.

[Updated: November 20, 2018.]

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It's a scene many moms are familiar with: Baby's pacifier drops to the floor so you take it to the sink, wipe it on your pants, or even pop it in your own mouth before giving it back to baby.

Perhaps that last option grosses you out, but cleaning a baby's pacifier with your own saliva may not be such a bad idea. According to a new study, the bacteria in a mother's mouth may actually help prevent allergies in young children.

New U.S. research being presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI), suggests that children of mothers who suck on their pacifiers to clean them have lower allergic responses than children whose mothers clean the soothers either by sterilization or hand washing.

Popping your child's dropped pacifier in your own mouth doesn't really clean it, but it can expose your child to whatever's in your mouth, and research suggests that exposure can strengthen immune systems.

"We found the children of mothers who sucked on the pacifier had lower IgE [immunoglubin E] levels," says Dr. Eliane Abou-Jaoude, the study's lead author and a fellow at the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit.

The body produces the antibody, IgE, when the immune system overreacts to an allergen, which can then cause an allergic reaction. Higher IgE levels indicate a higher risk of having allergies and asthma, according to Abou-Jaoude.

The researchers interviewed 128 mothers of infants over the course of 18 months for the study. Of the 128 mothers participating in the research, 58% reported that their child currently used a pacifier. Within that group, 4% of respondents reported cleaning their child's pacifier by sterilizing it, while 72% said they hand washed it, and 12% reported they sucked on it.

Only nine babies in the study had mothers who reported they sucked their children's binkies clean. But compared with the other children, those nine showed significantly lower levels of IgE, starting at around 10 months old. No fathers were included in the research.

The study has yet to be peer-reviewed and officially published, and its small sample size and short length of 18 months make it difficult to draw too many conclusions about long-term health outcomes, the researchers note. Other factors in addition to mom's saliva could have developed the children's immune systems.

"What's very, very important to realize is that this was not a cause and effect study, Abo-Jaoude tells CNN, noting that more research is needed to examine the possible correlation. "This is not telling you, if you suck on your child's pacifier, they will not develop allergies."

Still, the study does suggest few risks to cleaning a baby's pacifier with your own mouth, and the findings contribute to a growing body of research that indicates early exposure of microbes in babies may prevent allergies in children.

"The idea is that the microbes you're exposed to in infancy can affect your immune system's development later in life," Abou-Jaoude says.

A 2014 study conducted by scientists at the John Hopkins Children's Center showed a link between early exposure to bacteria and a lower likelihood of developing allergies and asthma. Infants in the study who were exposed to pet and rodent dander, as well as a wide variety of household bacteria, in the first year of life appeared less likely to suffer from allergies, wheezing and asthma.

The study also found the earlier the exposure the better — children who encountered such substances before their first birthday seemed to benefit rather than suffer from that exposure, while the same benefits were not seen if the child's first encounter with these substances occurred after age one.

The study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, suggests that early exposure to bacteria and certain allergens may have a protective effect by shaping children's immune systems — findings that are consistent with the so-called hygiene hypothesis, which states that children who grow up in very sterile environments may develop hypersensitive immune systems that make them prone to allergies.

Additional 2017 research from an Urban Environment and Childhood Asthma (URECA) study showed a lower risk of asthma at age seven for children in homes with higher levels of cat, mouse and cockroach allergens in the first three years of life. Previous research has also shown that children who grow up on farms, and thus have regular exposure to the microorganisms present in farm soil, also have lower allergy and asthma rates.

Despite the body of research, no one can say for certain whether pet dander or sucking on binkies will ensure your child an asthma and allergy-free future, but early exposure to household bacteria may help more than hurt.

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When Gabrielle Union surprised the world with a birth announcement this month after a long struggle with infertility, we were thrilled.

In an Instagram post announcing the birth of her child, Union shared how she and her husband Dwyane Wade welcomed their new baby girl thanks to a surrogate, but there was one detail missing: The baby girl's name!

This week, proud dad Wade (who is currently on paternity leave from the NBA) showed off his baby girl's name, as it is tattooed on his shoulders.

Kaavia James Union Wade is clearly very loved, and we love the story behind her unique name.

When a fan asked Union about the name on Instagram she explained how her daughter's middle name, James, is a family throwback.

"We wanted my family represented in her name," Union wrote. "My godfather is my uncle James Glass. She is named after him.. and then Union...thats... ya know...me."

The origins and meaning of the name Kaavia aren't clear, but a user suggestion on Names.org indicates the name may be Sanskrit in origin and could mean "work of art."

We don't know how accurate that name meaning is, but we do know that Kaavia is going to grow up with lots of love, and her traditionally male middle name is a good fit in a house full of boys. This little girl has four big brothers—Wade's sons 4-year-old Xavier, 11-year-old Zion, 16-year-old Zaire as well as Wade's 17-year-old nephew Dahveon, who has lived with Wade and Union for years.

Little Kaavia has a lot of people who love her, and we just love her name.

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Just weeks after announcing her pregnancy and letting the world know that's she's determined to keep working while she's expecting, Amy Schumer dropped some bad news Thursday.

She posted a photo of herself in a hospital bed with her little dog Tati, and spelled out the details of her health issues in the caption. "I have hyperemesis and it blows," Schumer wrote, noting that she's had to cancel upcoming shows in Texas due to the condition.

Poor Amy. Hyperemesis gravidarum (also known as HG) is a rare but serious pregnancy complication, and it's really tough.

Kate Middleton, Ayesha Curry and Motherly co-founder Elizabeth Tenety are among those who, like Schumer, have suffered from this form of severe morning sickness that can be totally debilitating.

As she previously wrote for Motherly, Tenety remembers becoming desperately ill, being confined to her apartment (mostly her bed) and never being far from a trash can, "I lost 10% of my body weight. I became severely dehydrated. I couldn't work. I couldn't even get out of bed. I could barely talk on the phone to tell my doctor how sick I was—begging them to please give me something, anything—to help."

Thankfully, she found relief through a prescription for Zofran, an anti-nausea drug.


It looks like Schumer is getting the medical help she obviously needs. In her Instagram post she wrote, "the doctors and nurses taking great care of me and Tati."

She seems to be getting IV fluids (she's probably super dehydrated) and hopefully her team can find a way to get her some relief with Zofran or another form of therapy.

Schumer says she feels very lucky to be pregnant, but HG can make a mama feel downright unlucky. As Schumer notes in her post, most mamas feel better in their second trimester, but HG can make it feel even worse than the first. "I've been even more ill this trimester," she says.

We're glad to see Schumer is getting help, and totally understand why she would have to cancel her shows. Any mama who has been through HG will tell you, that wouldn't be a show you'd want front row seats for anyway.

Get well soon, Amy!

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