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5 beauty tools that will *completely* change your getting ready routine, mama

It can be easy for moms to get stuck in a beauty rut. When you typically only have five to 10 minutes to pull yourself together, you don't want to waste time trying new products and tools that might not deliver on their lofty promises.

That's where we come in, mama. We've done the legwork testing these five new beauty tools—and we couldn't believe the results. Ready to shake things up?

Here are the products you'll want to add to your shopping cart this fall.

1. Sonia Kashuk flat-top foundation brush

Can a single brush make that much of a difference with your makeup? Turns out it can, mama. The secret is this brush's flat top, which makes liquid foundation blend like a dream. Simply dot your product directly on the brush (or on the back of your hand) and enjoy the silky, even finish.

Sonia Kashuk Flat-top Foundation Brush, Target, $9.00

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Motherly is your daily #momlife manual; we are here to help you easily find the best, most beautiful products for your life that actually work. We share what we love—and we may receive a commission if you choose to buy. You've got this.

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