With additional reporting by Chaunie Brusie, Ellen Schmidt, Aliza Friedlander and Erin Lem.

There are few things that preoccupy new parents more than their baby's sleep—from how to get more sleep to the best sleep schedule to ensure more zzzz's for parents and baby. Good news: we created a baby sleep schedule for baby's first weeks through their first birthday to help answer your top sleep questions from, "when do babies sleep 12 hours straight?" to "how much sleep should a newborn get?" Read on for expert-driven tips, sleep schedules and wake windows for baby's first year.

1 week old baby sleep

"How much sleep does my newborn need?" is an age-old question for new moms and dads everywhere. The short answer? A LOT. If you're worried your baby is sleeping too much or not sleeping enough, we've created a week-by-week guide to help you find the answers you need and develop a newborn sleep schedule that works for your baby and your family. The first step to a healthy sleep pattern is a regular sleep schedule—we've got you covered, mama.

To help you figure out the early weeks of newborn sleep, we've put together a handy sleep schedule of how much your one-week-old is sleeping, plus some tips for ensuring the best sleep.

Your new baby needs lots of sleep: a newborn should get 14-17 hours of sleep per 24 hours, according to the National Sleep Foundation."Newborns need about 14-17 hours of sleep in a 24 hour period," says Rachel Mitchell, a certified pediatric and maternity sleep consultant. "Because sleep is still inconsistent in this stage, naps will vary in length and stretches of night sleep will also vary. Ideally, newborns are getting between 4.5-6.5 hours of day-sleep and 10-12 hours of night-sleep, but your baby is going to have a hard time telling the difference between their days and nights which can make sleep feel like it all blends together. To help with this, I recommend waking your baby at the three-hour mark for naps and exposing them to light as much as possible during awake periods, and keeping the room dark for both naps and night sleep. If it seems like your baby struggles to sleep in the crib or bassinet, it is OK to hold [them] for 1-2 naps, but make sure you are still attempting naps in the crib/bassinet for at least 2-3 naps per day. Bedtime will also be later in this stage since your baby is not yet producing the hormone melatonin. Typically newborns do best with a bedtime between 7:30-9:30 pm, so if you notice that your baby struggles with an earlier bedtime don't be afraid to push that back a bit."

How much sleep does a one-week-old baby need?

A one-week-old baby will likely sleep in spurts because they need to eat often to ensure proper weight gain, and, of course, they need plenty of diaper changes. Your newborn might even fall right back asleep after filling their tummy (if only we all could, right?) However, if your baby is sleeping through feedings, ask your pediatrician for advice.

You may be wondering how you will get your baby fed with that much sleeping going on, so we've put together a sample sleep schedule of what one 24-hour period with a one-week-old baby would look like. Newborns make their own schedule, for the most part. Developing a solid sleep schedule can take a few weeks (or longer) to take hold.

You may even notice your baby gets themselves on their own regular routine after two or three weeks, and you can take their lead if it works for your family. Therefore, this is just a rough guide of what you can expect your baby to do, not a strict sleep schedule to adhere to.

Wake windows for a one-week-old baby

What are wake windows and why are they important? A wake window is the period of time a baby can stay awake in between naps without being overtired. Since newborn babies can't self-regulate their own sleep patterns, they can become overtired instead of simply just falling asleep.

"Because sleep still varies you are not following a by-the-clock schedule, but rather awake windows between 60-90 minutes. You can have a schedule in mind but just understand this will change daily. You may find that it is hard for your one-week-old to stay awake, which is completely normal. Remember that they are still adjusting to life outside of the womb and they are growing rapidly, which makes them quite tired!" says Mitchell.

Sleep tips for newborns

Your one week old doesn't yet know the difference between night and day. Keeping things quiet, dim, and calm during those nighttime feedings and diaper changes can help them recognize it's still time to sleep.

Remember, try not to keep your baby awake if they don't want to be. An overly tired newborn can have trouble settling down and falling asleep at all, even if they're exhausted.

  • Always place your baby on their back to sleep, not on the stomach or side. This helps to reduce the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and Sudden Unexplained Infant Death (SUID). The American Academy of Pediatrics initiated the "Back to Sleep" movement in 1992, and rates of SIDS/SUID have decreased dramatically since.
  • Do not put anything else in the crib or bassinet. Keep plush toys, pillows, blankets, loose sheets, and bumpers out of your baby's crib or bassinet for similar reasons as above.
  • Avoid overheating. Even though they're itty-bitty babies, you can dress them according to the room's temperature. Don't over-swaddle or over-layer their clothing.
  • Try a pacifier. "You can also introduce the swaddle and pacifier at this stage to help promote sleep once the feeding relationship has been established," Mitchell says. If they reject it, that's OK. If it falls out, that's OK.
  • Use a white noise machine. Whether your house is quiet as a mouse, or you've got other kids running around making noise, a white noise machine can help your baby feel soothed (and possibly tune out) in their surroundings. Mitchell also says it "will help replicate that sound your baby heard frequently in the womb."
  • Snuggle it up. Your newborn wants your cuddles as much as you want to give them—especially if they're fussy. Swaddle them up snugly, then rock them until they quiet down. There's no such thing as holding a newborn too much (for safety reasons, don't fall asleep with them in your arms).

For more baby sleep schedules click here.

2 week old baby sleep

Your baby's two weeks old! That first week might have felt like an eternity (mostly because you were awake for way more hours way more hours in the day than you're used to) and you may feel like you'll never get in a rhythm, but as your little one continues to adjust to the world outside the womb, you'll continue to adjust to motherhood. If it seems like your bundle of joy is sleeping at all hours of the day, don't worry, that's normal! This week, though, they'll start being able to tell the difference between day and night, which is bound to make both of your lives easier.

How much sleep does a two-week-old baby need?

You may not be getting much sleep these days, but your new baby needs lots of it: a newborn should get 14-17 hours of sleep per 24 hours, according to the National Sleep Foundation.

"At two weeks old, your baby's sleep is very similar to week one, not changing much," says Rachel Mitchell, a certified pediatric and maternity sleep consultant. "The only difference you may see is that your baby is starting to become slightly more alert than they were at week one. If you haven't implemented a nap and nightly routine, I also suggest starting this now, as it will help all of you start to find a regular rhythm and help your baby become more prepared for sleep. Your nap routine should be about 15-25 minutes including a feed and your bedtime routine closer to 20-30 minutes."

Mitchell also adds that in this stage, "it is completely fine to feed or rock your baby to sleep. A lot of parents worry that this will create bad 'habits,' but in this stage, your baby is not yet making those associations. You just want to make sure you aren't feeding to sleep for every nap, at night, and for every wake-up. If you are starting to venture outside of the home, know that it is OK if your baby falls asleep in the car or the stroller, but you want to make sure that you are practicing safe sleep in these spaces, and that you can always see your baby. Remember that the safest and best sleep for your baby is always in their own environment in a crib or bassinet so while you don't need to be home-bound, just do your best to plan outings around naps."

With all that sleep happening, you may be worrying about when you'll have time to feed, change and engage with your little sweetie. That's where we come in. We've put together a sample sleep schedule of what one 24-hour period with a two-week-old baby would look like.

(Note: this is meant to be a rough guide of what you can expect a day to look like, but it is not meant to be a sleep schedule you put your baby on.)

Wake windows for a two-week-old

The phrase "wake window" may be foreign to you now, but it's something you'll be conscious of for the next year-plus. A wake window is the period of time an infant can stay awake in between naps without getting overtired. Newborns are unable to self-regulate their sleep patterns, so instead of simply just falling asleep, they can become overtired.

Mitchell notes that for a two-week-old baby the wake window is 60-90 minutes, which is the longest they will be able to stay awake.

For more baby sleep schedules click here.

3 week old baby sleep

It's been three weeks since your bundle of joy has been in your life, and though some semblance of routine may be starting to emerge (feed, sleep, poop, repeat), it's natural to wonder if your baby will ever get onto a sleep schedule. The good news is, your little one is beginning to distinguish day from night at this age. Bad news is, they're still going to need to eat every few hours, even at night. We know you're exhausted and wonder if you (or your child) will ever sleep through the night. You will! But not quite yet.

How much sleep does a three-week-old baby need?

Your baby is still sleeping a lot: a newborn at this age should get 14-17 hours of sleep per 24 hours, according to the National Sleep Foundation.

"At three weeks old, there is no major change in your baby's sleep from previous weeks," says founder of My Sweet Sleeper Rachel Mitchell, a certified pediatric and maternity sleep consultant. "However, your baby is likely starting to take in more during feeds, which can help promote longer stretches of sleep at night."

It's during this time that feeding habits may change. "You may also ask your pediatrician around this time if you can stop waking up your baby at night to feed and wait until they wake you," says Mitchell. "Once you get the green light to do this, if you notice your baby is still waking every couple hours at night, ensure they are getting full feeds every three hours during the day and consider offering a dream feed between 10 and 11 p.m."

However, baby still needs you. "Remember in this stage that your baby needs you to help them self-regulate. Your baby is not yet ready to learn independent soothing skills and so it is important that you respond to your baby quickly when they start crying. Stirring or fussing is normal and doesn't necessarily need an immediate response, but hard crying should be capped at just a few minutes. While you can't work on independent soothing yet, you can focus on the four key areas of foundations which are nutrition, sleep environment, routine, and awake windows."

With all those zzz's you may wonder how you'll have time for anything else. We've put together a sample schedule so you can visualize what one 24-hour period with a three-week-old baby may look like. (Note: this is meant to be a rough guide of what you can expect; it's not meant to be a sleep schedule to attempt to put your baby on.)

Wake windows for a three-week-old

A wake window is the period of time a baby can stay awake in between snoozes without getting overtired. Newborn babies can't self-regulate their own sleep patterns and can become overtired instead of simply just falling asleep, so wake windows are crucial in making sure your little one is as happy as can be. At this age, 60-90 minutes are the longest a newborn baby will be able to stay awake, according to Mitchell.

For more baby sleep schedules and baby sleep tips click here.

4 week old baby sleep

Can you believe your baby is four weeks old?! In the past month, there were surely some ups and downs (and tears from both of you) as you and your little one continue to adjust to your new lives. Your newborn now knows the difference between day and night, but that doesn't mean they're sleeping through the latter. (That will come later, we promise!) Now that you feel like you might have some sort of semblance of routine, you may be wondering how much sleep newborns need and if yours is getting enough (or too much!). That's where we come in.

To help you navigate these early weeks of infant sleep, we've put together a guide that includes a handy sleep schedule that illustrates how much the average four-week-old baby sleeps, plus some tips on these early days of sleeping.

How much sleep does a four-week-old baby need?

Think your baby sleeps a lot? That's a good thing! According to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, a newborn should get 12-16 hours of sleep per 24 hours.

"At four weeks old, your baby is officially one month, which is an exciting milestone! By this time you have started to get into a routine throughout the day and before naps and bedtime. If you haven't implemented a routine, you want to make sure you start one as soon as possible," says Rachel Mitchell, founder of My Sweet Sleeper. "At this stage, you've likely noticed that your baby is much more alert than they were at week 1, and thus their naps may start to feel a little more consistent, although they will still change from day-to-day. It is recommended for your baby to be taking between 4-5 naps per day which will continue to vary in length. You can continue to hold for one or two naps of the day if needed and attempt at least 2 naps in the crib/bassinet. If you do need to hold for a nap try to do this for the 2nd and 4th nap of the day as these are usually the most difficult for your baby."

This amount of sleep might have been welcomed during the first few weeks, but now you may be wondering how you'll get anything done with your baby when they're sleeping most of the day. We've put together a sample sleep schedule so you can see what one 24-hour period typically looks like with a four-week-old. (Note: this is meant to be a rough guide, not a sleep schedule to attempt to put your baby on.)"If you are wondering if you can follow a schedule yet, it is not quite time! In fact, you have quite a while until you can follow a by-the-clock schedule with your baby. However, you can definitely have a schedule in mind that you are working off of, just remember it will still change from day to day so don't worry if it still feels very inconsistent-that is normal and expected!" says Mitchell.

Wake windows for a four-week-old baby

If you're unfamiliar with the term "wake window," don't worry — with time it'll become a constant phrase in your vocabulary. A wake window is the period of time an infant can stay awake in between naps without getting overtired. Since newborn babies are unable to self-regulate their sleep patterns, it's easier for them to become overtired instead of simply just falling asleep.

Each baby is different; however, most newborns can't stay awake longer than 45 minutes, and the average wake window for a four-week-old baby is 30 minutes. During this time, you can change their diaper, feed them, bathe them, do some tummy time, read, sing, or engage in whatever way you'd like before it's time for them to catch some zzz's again.

Sleep tips for 4 week old babies

Newborns make their own schedule for the most part. Developing a solid sleep schedule can take a few weeks (or longer) to take hold. You may even notice your baby gets themselves on their own regular routine after two or three weeks, and you can take their lead if it works for your family.

Your four-week-old doesn't yet know the difference between night and day. Keeping things quiet, dim, and calm during those nighttime feedings and diaper changes can help them recognize it's still time to sleep.

Remember, try not to keep your baby awake if they don't want to be. An overly tired newborn can have trouble settling down and falling asleep at all, even if they're exhausted.

  • Always place your baby on their back to sleep, not on the stomach or side. This helps to reduce the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and Sudden Unexplained Infant Death (SUID). The American Academy of Pediatrics initiated the "Back to Sleep" movement in 1992, and rates of SIDS/SUID have decreased dramatically since.
  • Do not put anything else in the crib or bassinet. Keep plush toys, pillows, blankets, loose sheets, and bumpers out of your baby's crib or bassinet for similar reasons as above.
  • Avoid overheating. Even though they're itty-bitty babies, you can dress them according to the room's temperature. Don't over-swaddle or over-layer their clothing.
  • Try a pacifier. If they reject it, that's OK. If it falls out, that's OK. If you're breastfeeding, you may want to wait until baby is comfortable with latching and effectively nursing before introducing a pacifier.
  • Use a white noise machine. Whether your house is quiet as a mouse, or you've got other kids running around making noise, a white noise machine can help your baby feel soothed (and possibly tune out) in their surroundings.
  • Snuggle it up. Your newborn wants your cuddles as much as you want to give them—especially if they're fussy. Swaddle them up snugly, then rock them until they quiet down. There's no such thing as holding a newborn too much (for safety reasons, don't fall asleep with them in your arms).

For more baby sleep schedules and baby sleep tips click here.

5 week old baby sleep

"How much sleep does my five-week-old baby need?" is an age-old question for new moms and dads everywhere. The short answer? A LOT. If you're worried your baby is sleeping too much or not sleeping enough, we've created a week-by-week guide to help you find the answers you need and develop a newborn sleep schedule that works for your baby and your family. The first step to a healthy sleep pattern is a regular sleep schedule—we've got you covered, mama.

How much sleep does a five-week-old baby need?

At five weeks old, your baby is still considered to be a newborn for a few more weeks but is likely growing bigger and stronger every day. And your baby is growing so well because you, mama, are doing everything right.

Your baby won't be sleeping through the night just yet, but they're likely having longer wake times and sleep stretches—hooray! Much like those first few weeks, your baby still needs to sleep for an average of 16 hours in a 24-hour-period. Remember, all babies are different and they all develop at their own pace—that includes sleeping, too!

"At five weeks old, your baby has likely given you at least one stretch of sleep at night over 4 hours, which can feel life-changing! Continue to focus on full feeds throughout the day to ensure that your baby is able to sleep longer stretches at night without a feed. It is still normal though for your baby to need anywhere from 1-3 feeds overnight in this stage," says Rachel Mitchell, founder of My Sweet Sleeper. "Remember that inconsistent naps are still developmentally normal, but keep attempting naps every 60-90 minutes and make sure to watch your baby's sleep cues closely to see if they may need to go to sleep sooner. All babies vary in their awake windows which is why we provide a range, so you may see your baby is on the shorter end or higher end of the range."

When it comes to developing a solid daily routine, your five-week-old likely already has one. Babies are great at adapting to predictability and often end up sleeping, waking, and eating at similar times each day. If you're looking to establish a more set routine for your five-week-old, here's a sample sleep schedule of what one 24-hour period with a five-week-old baby would look like.

(Note: this is meant to be a rough guide of what you can expect your baby to do; however, this is not meant to be a strict sleep schedule to adhere to.)

What are wake windows and why are they important?

wake window is the period of time a baby can stay awake in between naps without being overtired. Since newborn babies can't self-regulate their own sleep patterns, they can become overtired instead of simply just falling asleep.Wake windows for a five-week-old

For a five-week-old, the average wake window is still 30-45 minutes. During these wake windows, you can change their diaper, sing to them, talk to them, snuggle, set them down safely in a swing, or do whatever you want to do with them before it's time for them to catch some zzz's again.

For more baby sleep schedules and baby sleep tips click here.

6 week old baby sleep

You've made it to week six, and if your baby's an early learner they might have gifted you with that first precious social smile. If not, don't worry! Most infants hit this milestone between six to eight weeks. As you continue to get into a groove with your baby, you may be wondering if there's supposed to be some sort of pattern with sleep at this age (because it seems like they're snoozing constantly, yet you somehow never sleep).

How much sleep does a six-week-old baby need?

You may be sleep-deprived these days, but your new baby needs lots of zzz's. According to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, a newborn should get 12-16 hours of sleep per 24 hours.

"At six weeks old your baby is likely going through their first major development leap and you may start to see longer stretches of sleep at night (between 4-6 hours) more consistently," says Rachel Mitchell, founder of My Sweet Sleeper. "Your baby will also start to become more alert and aware of their surroundings during the day, which means those 3-hour naps may start to become less frequent."

With so much time dedicated to sleep, you may be wondering when you'll have time to feed, change, bath and engage with your little one. That's where we come in. We've put together a sample sleep schedule of what one 24-hour period with a six-week-old baby would look like. (Note: this is meant to be a rough guide of what you can expect a day to look like, but it is not meant to be a sleep schedule you put your baby on.)

"This is also the time that your baby's peak fussy period can start which can cause them to become really fussy in the evening and you may see they start to fight the last nap of the day. If this is happening, it is completely OK to hold or babywear for that last nap," says Mitchell. "Continue to practice a later bedtime (between 7:30-9:30 pm) and make sure that you are consistent with your nightly routine. Offering a luke-warm bath, dimming the lights, and turning on white noise in the evening can also help with your baby's fussy periods as well as nursing or feeding if needed. Remember that nursing to sleep in this stage is still completely normal and encouraged on occasion, especially if it helps settle your baby during this fussy period."

6 week old wake windows

If you're not yet familiar with the term "wake window," it's the period of time a baby can stay awake in between naps without getting overtired. Newborns are unable to self-regulate their sleep patterns, so instead of simply just falling asleep, they can become overtired. And that's not good for anyone!

Though each baby is different, most newborns can't stay awake longer than 45 minutes (the average wake window for a six-week-old baby is 30 minutes). This is the time where you'll be able to change their diaper, feed them, bathe them, and/or stimulate them with songs, books, tummy time, or whatever you'd like before it's time to snooze again.

Sleep tips for newborns:

As you work on creating a daytime and evening sleep schedule for your baby, establish a bedtime routine and hopefully get a bit more sleep yourself.

For more baby sleep schedules and baby sleep tips click here.

7 week old baby sleep

Your baby's seven weeks old! If they're an early learner, they may be able to lift their head and give you a heart-melting gummy social smile, but if not don't worry! Those milestones will come in the following weeks. As you and your little one continue to get adjusted to your new lives together, you may be wondering what newborn sleep schedules are supposed to look like (and when you'll ever get to sleep again).

How much sleep does a seven-week-old baby need?

Your newborn needs sleep, and lots of it: according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, a newborn should get 12-16 hours of sleep per 24 hours.

"At 7 weeks old, you may notice that your baby's naps are starting to become a bit shorter, which is normal. Because newborn sleep cycles only last between 30-40 minutes or so, it is common to see a lot of naps that only last this long. In this case, it is fine to help your baby go back to sleep by replacing their pacifier or picking them up and rocking them back to sleep," says Rachel Mitchell, founder of My Sweet Sleeper. "If you notice that your baby is only taking short naps, you can practice a held nap for at least one nap per day, if that helps your baby connect sleep cycles. You just want to make sure to do this safely and to still attempt crib naps for the majority of naps throughout the day."

With most hours of the day dedicated to snoozing, you may be wondering about when you'll have time to feed, change, bath and engage with your little sweetie. We've put together a sample sleep schedule of what one 24-hour period with a seven-week-old baby could look like. (Note: this is meant to be a rough guide of what you can expect a day with your baby to look like; however, it is not meant to be a sleep schedule you put your baby on.)

"Peak fussiness will likely continue through this stage, tapering off in a few weeks so continue to practice a later bedtime, unless it seems that your baby does better with an earlier one. This sometimes takes a bit of trial and error to find their sweet spot for bedtime!" says Mitchell.

Wake windows for a seven-week-old

Though each baby is different, most newborns can't stay awake longer than 45 minutes. The average wake window for a seven-week-old baby is 30 minutes. During this time you can change their diaper, feed them, bathe them, stimulate them with some tummy time, books, or songs, or engage in any other activity you'd like before it's time to catch some zzz's again.

For more baby sleep schedules and baby sleep tips click here.

8 week old baby sleep

For new parents, sleep is a precious and rare commodity. By eight weeks, most parents are going on two full months of no sleep. The highs of new parenthood have potentially worn off while the feelings of sheer exhaustion take over. It was around the eight-week mark I remember questioning if I would ever sleep through the night again.

How much sleep does an eight-week-old baby need?

Newborns need a ton of sleep: according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, a newborn should get 12-16 hours of sleep per 24 hours.

"Congratulations, your baby is now officially 2 months old! By this [stage] your baby has likely given you several long stretches of night sleep and naps are becoming more pronounced, although they are still going to vary for a while. Night sleep almost always organizes before day sleep so it is not uncommon for your baby to take consistent stretches at night but then to take two 40 minutes naps, and then a 2.5-hour nap. Typically I recommend waking your baby at the 2.5-3 hour mark though to ensure they aren't missing a feed, and their naps are being distributed properly throughout the day," says Rachel Mitchell, founder of My Sweet Sleeper.

Your newborn will spend at least half, but usually more, of the days catching some zzzs. You're probably wondering when the baby eats if they are sleeping so much. We've put together an example of a sleep schedule for an 8-week-old baby.

Below is what your schedule may look like over the course of a 24-hour day. (Keep in Mind: This is a rough guide of what you can expect from your baby. It's not meant to be a sleep schedule you put in place for your baby.)

"This is also around the time that your baby is seeming a lot more alert and possibly even getting distracted by their surroundings. Because of this, I recommend feeding in a low stimulating environment and making sure to give your baby plenty of transition time from activities to sleep periods so they have time to wind down. You are still following 60-90 minute awake windows at this point but you may notice that your baby can stay awake a little longer than they could just a few weeks ago. Continue to watch sleepy cues to help determine the optimal time for your baby to sleep," says Mitchell.

Wake windows for a 2-month-old baby

Newborn babies can't self-regulate their sleep patterns. By eight weeks, mom or dad will probably start picking up on cues that indicate the baby is tired. And it's imperative we pay attention to those cues because an overtired baby tends to have a hard time falling asleep and staying asleep.

Babies tend to have wake windows; a period of time a baby can stay awake in between naps without being overtired. Every baby is different, but on average, newborns can't stay awake for longer than 45 minutes. The average wake window for an 8-week-old newborn is between 45 and 90 minutes at a time. During this time, you can change their diaper, talk to them, rock them or do whatever you want to do with them before it's time to sleep again.

For more baby sleep schedules and baby sleep tips click here.

9 week old baby sleep

"Are you getting any sleep yet?" That's one of the most common questions a new parent gets. And when the baby is nine weeks old, it's a question most parents probably don't want to hear.

It's unlikely your baby will sleep through the night by nine weeks. But that doesn't mean you have to have completely sleepless nights. There are many ways to navigate these early weeks of newborn sleep. And we've put together a simple sleep schedule including how much time your nine-week-old is sleeping and tips on those early days.

How much sleep does a nine-week-old baby need?

Your new baby needs lots of sleep: a newborn should get 14-17 hours of sleep per 24 hours, according to the National Sleep Foundation.

"At nine weeks, you should see a pattern start to emerge with 3-4 naps per day, and at least two of those naps are ideally longer than 1-1.5 hours. If short naps persist and you notice that your baby isn't taking ANY long naps, you want to make sure that all of your baby's sleep foundations are in place. You can do this by focusing on full feeds every three hours throughout the day (with 1-2 feeds at night), a consistent nap and bedtime routine, practicing a consistent sleep environment that is promoting of sleep, and following 60-90 minute awake windows," says Rachel Mitchell, founder of My Sweet Sleeper. If short naps continue to persist, keep practicing one assisted nap of the day."

There's a reason people say all newborns do is eat, sleep and poop. While every baby is different, the majority of newborns sleep on and off most of the day. And when they aren't sleeping, they are eating.

To get yourself in a routine, we've put together a 24-hour mock sleep schedule for your 9-week old baby. (Note: this is meant to be an example of what you can expect your baby to do, however this is not meant to be a sleep schedule to attempt to put your baby on.)

"You will also notice that the less day sleep your baby gets, the more likely they are to wake up throughout the night. This is because sleep promotes sleep, so keep working on those naps and be as consistent as you can. You can continue to practice a later bedtime in this stage, unless you notice that your baby does better with an earlier bedtime. This is fine as long as bedtime isn't before 630pm," says Mitchell.

Wake windows for a nine-week-old

The average wake window for a nine-week-old newborn is 60-90 minutes at a time. During wake windows, you can do anything you want with the baby, including singing to them, playing with them, talking to them, taking them for a walk, changing their diapers or feeding them. By nine weeks, your wake windows are getting longer, so you can do a little more before it's time for the baby to hit the hay again.

For more baby sleep schedules and baby sleep tips click here.

10 week old baby sleep

At this point, you are 10 weeks postpartum and probably still waking up in the middle of the night. Don't stress about it. That's expected. But even though you knew you were going to run on months of sleepless nights, the exhaustion is starting to catch up.

How much sleep does a 10-week-old baby need?

Your newborn will spend most of his or her time sleeping: according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, a newborn should get 12-16 hours of sleep per 24 hours.

"At 10 weeks, the amount of naps and overall sleep totals remain the same. But at this stage, it becomes more realistic to start to practice putting your baby down awake instead of completely asleep," says Rachel Mitchell, founder my My Sweet Sleeper. "Remember, though, it is just practice and it will take time for your baby to learn this skill. I continue to recommend the use of the pacifier, white noise, swaddling and ensuring the room is dark for all naps and night sleep."

With all that sleep, you may be wondering when your baby will eat. Basically, when a baby isn't sleeping, he or she is eating. To make your life as easy as possible, we've put together an example of what a 24-hour sleep schedule will look like for a 10-week-old infant. (Note: This is a rough guide of what you can expect from your baby. It's not meant to be a sleep schedule you put in place for your baby.)

"You can also start to think about moving bedtime slightly earlier by moving it up about 30 minutes each day and seeing how your baby responds. If they struggle with this, it is OK to hold off for a bit longer, as melatonin isn't quite producing yet so an earlier bedtime might still be tough for your baby," says Mitchell.

Wake windows for a 10-week-old

Babies usually eat during their wake windows. A wake window is the period of time when the baby is awake in between nap times. They are important to know about because an overtired baby struggles to fall asleep.

The average wake window for a 10-week-old infant is 45-60 minutes. This is the sweet spot of how long your baby should be awake so they aren't too tired. During the baby's wake window, you can feed the baby, change the diaper, play with the baby or do anything you want. But don't try to keep the baby up longer than their wake window, otherwise, you could end up with a fussy baby who isn't getting enough sleep.

For more baby sleep schedules and baby sleep tips click here.

11 week old baby sleep

newborn's sleep schedule can sometimes be difficult to decipher: How much sleep does your baby actually need? And are they getting enough sleep? If you're wondering about how much sleep your 11-week-old baby should be getting each day, we've got some answers for you. Because sleep is so vitally important for your baby (and you, too, for that matter!), we've created a helpful week-by-week guide to assist you in navigating the early months of your baby's sleep journey. You've got this, mama.

How much sleep does an 11-week-old baby need?

According to The Baby Sleep Site, at 11 weeks old your baby will be sleeping about 14-16 hours total each day—about 10 hours at night, and 4-6 hours total during the day. By eleven weeks, your baby will even be ready for a more predictable bedtime and bedtime routine, too. While this can be flexible, an 11-week-old's bedtime should fall somewhere between 7 and 10 pm. The first step in creating a difference between baby's nighttime sleep and daytime sleep is having an official bedtime, which will aid in baby's development.

In creating a bedtime routine, keep it short (babies can become overtired otherwise). Consider relaxing activities, like singing a lullaby and reading a simple bedtime story. While some babies do find an evening bath soothing, others tend to get excited during baths, which is the opposite effect you are going for at bedtime.

"Your baby has almost graduated from the newborn stage and, hopefully at this point, you are starting to see a bit more consistency in their sleep patterns. If you still feel like your baby's sleep is chaotic and unpredictable, don't panic! It is still developmentally normal for sleep to be disorganized," says Rachel Mitchell, founder of My Sweet Sleeper. "You may also notice that your baby doesn't need to be fed as frequently overnight. The average amount of night feedings in this stage is between 1-2 as long as your baby is getting adequate nutrition throughout the day. Typically, I recommend trying to book feeds at each end of the night. For example, feeding about 4 hours after your baby has gone to sleep (between 10-1130pm) and then again sometime between 4-530am. All babies are going to vary when it comes to feeds in this stage and you want to ensure that your baby is continuing to gain weight and speak with your pediatrician before you decide to drop a night feed."

To assist in determining baby's schedule, while keeping in mind bedtime and the evolving differentiation between nighttime sleep and daytime sleep, The Baby Sleep Site offers a sample sleep schedule of what one 24-hour period with an 11-week-old baby would look like. (Note: this is meant to be a rough guide of what you can expect your baby to do; however, this is not meant to be a strict sleep schedule to adhere to.)

Wake windows for an 11-week-old

The average wake window for an eleven-week-old newborn is 1 to 1.5 hours, according to Amy Motroni, a baby and toddler sleep consultant. While baby is awake, it's time to for eating, playing and getting a diaper change. As your baby approaches 3 months old, they will likely be staying awake a bit more during the day, while some naps may be getting shorter.

For more baby sleep schedules and baby sleep tips click here.

12 week old baby sleep

As your baby approaches the 12-week mark, you may be wondering if there is any hope for more sleep in your future. We have good news: there totally is!

Twelve weeks marks an important milestone in your baby's development when they start moving towards a more regular sleep-and-wake pattern. Translation? More sleep is on the horizon, mama, we promise. Of course, like all things with parenting, every baby is different and you may need a little help navigating sleep with your growing baby.

By week 12, your baby might be giving you some longer stretches of sleep (yay!). Read on for advice on what a sleep schedule for a 12-week-old should look like, along with tips for catching more zzz's.

How much sleep does a 12-week-old baby need?

Your baby still needs a lot of sleep: according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, a newborn should get 12-16 hours of sleep per 24 hours.

"Your baby is no longer considered a newborn in this stage, and they don't need quite as much sleep as they did prior. My recommendation for total sleep is between 3.5-5.5 hours of day sleep and between 10-12 hours of night sleep," says Rachel Mitchell, founder of My Sweet Sleeper. "Ideally, your baby is taking 3-4 naps with 1-2 long naps and sleeping between 10-12 hours at night. This doesn't necessarily mean they will sleep 10-12 hours straight, but the goal is for 10-12 hours overall throughout the night. Awake windows will also lengthen slightly in this stage from 60-90 minutes to 60-120 minutes. I recommend continuing to follow 60-90 minute awake windows in between naps and no more than 2 hours before bed, if your baby can handle it."

Twelve weeks marks a big shift in your baby's sleep, as they start to develop more of a normal wake and sleep pattern instead of the party-all-night attitude they may have shown so far. As those patterns begin to emerge, you may notice more regular wake windows during the day–and more clear signs that your baby is sleepy.

You'll want to pay attention to your baby's sleep cues and help them learn how to sleep (yes, learning to sleep is a skill that can be taught!) by practicing a regular sleep schedule. Every baby and family is different, but here's an example of a sleep schedule that may be helpful for a twelve-week-old.

"At this stage, a lot of parents start to see consistent stretches of night sleep, so if you are still seeing that your baby is waking frequently throughout the night, take a look at their foundations and see if there is something that may be preventing them from sleeping well at night such as going to bed overtired or lack of daytime nutrition," says Mitchell.

Wake windows for a 12-week-old

Wake windows are the amount of time your baby can stay awake during the day before she needs a nap. At twelve weeks old, that length of awake time should start to stretch out more. The National Sleep Foundation recommends 14-17 hours of sleep per day for babies 0-3 months old, but that number drops to 12-15 hours around twelve weeks. That means your baby's wake window will gradually start to increase to a couple of hours between naps.

Sleep tips for 12 week old babies

Week 12 marks an exciting–and important–development in babies, as the first signs of a natural circadian rhythm begin to emerge. Some babies may even start to sleep through the night at this age, which, so you're one of the lucky ones to experience this, enjoy it! Of course, that doesn't mean that all babies will be sleeping soundly through the night by this age, but it does mean you might notice longer stretches of sleep in your little one.

You can support the development of your baby's circadian rhythm at this age by establishing a clear bedtime routine, like a bath followed by a special story, to signal to your baby that it's time for sleep. Here are some more tips for encouraging your baby to sleep at twelve weeks old:

  • Always place your baby on their back to sleep, not on the stomach or side. This helps to reduce the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and Sudden Unexplained Infant Death (SUID). The American Academy of Pediatrics initiated the "Back to Sleep" movement in 1992, and rates of SIDS/SUID have decreased dramatically since.
  • Do not put anything else in the crib or bassinet. Keep plush toys, pillows, blankets, loose sheets, and bumpers out of your baby's crib or bassinet for similar reasons as above.
  • Avoid overheating. Even though they're itty-bitty babies, you can dress them according to the room's temperature. Don't over-swaddle or over-layer their clothing.
  • Try a pacifier. If they reject it, that's OK. If it falls out, that's OK. If you're breastfeeding, you may want to wait until baby is comfortable with latching and effectively nursing before introducing a pacifier.
  • Use a white noise machine. Whether your house is quiet as a mouse, or you've got other kids running around making noise, a white noise machine can help your baby feel soothed (and possibly tune out) in their surroundings.
  • Snuggle it up. Your newborn wants your cuddles as much as you want to give them—especially if they're fussy. Swaddle them up snugly, then rock them until they quiet down. There's no such thing as holding a newborn too much (for safety reasons, don't fall asleep with them in your arms).

For more baby sleep schedules and baby sleep tips click here.

13 week old baby sleep

If you have a baby, chances are you spend A LOT of time thinking about their sleep habits. Are they getting enough? How much do they really need? Will they ever sleep through the night, or is that just a parenting mirage?

If you're worried about your baby's sleep routine, we've created a week-by-week guide to help you find the answers you need and develop an infant sleep schedule that works for your baby and your family. The first step to a healthy sleep pattern is a regular sleep schedule—we've got you covered, mama.

How much sleep does a 13-week-old baby need?

Infants up to three months old should be getting 14-17 hours of sleep within a 24-hour period, according to the National Sleep Foundation. By three months of age, many babies will have settled into a predictable sleep routine. Your baby likely takes two to three naps during the daytime, with longer stretches of nighttime sleep compared to those early newborn weeks.

Remember, all babies are different and they all develop at their own pace—that includes sleeping, too!

"This is the stage I recommend parents start to really think about moving their baby's bedtime up if they were on a later bedtime. You can do this by gradually adjusting their bedtime 20-25 minutes each night and adjusting the last nap of the day if needed to close that gap," says Rachel Mitchell, founder of My Sweet Sleeper. "You may also be wondering when you can start 'sleep training' or teaching those independent skills. Their internal sleep clock is still forming and your baby still relies on you to help them self-regulate, but you can definitely start gradually introducing more independence by continuing to put your baby down awake, and pausing a bit longer before responding to your baby for wake-ups."

At three months old, your baby can be placed in their crib while awake, but drowsy and ready for bed. Rocking or nursing your baby to sleep is fine, of course! If that's what works for you, that's what works for you. Though your baby will likely come to expect sleep assistance from you the longer you provide it.

If you're looking to make sure your sleep routine for your 13-week-old is a solid one, here's a sample sleep schedule of what one 24-hour period with a 13-week-old baby would look like. (Note: this is meant to be a rough guide of what you can expect your baby to do; however, this is not meant to be a strict sleep schedule to adhere to.)

OPTION 1: Early bedtime routine, starting at 6:15 pm, with baby asleep by 6:45 pm.

OPTION 2: Offer a nap at 6:15 pm. Wake up baby at 7 pm, with an 8:45 pm final bedtime.

What are wake windows and why are they important?

wake window is the period of time a baby can stay awake in between naps without being overtired. Wake windows for a 13-week-old.

For a 13-week-old infant, wake windows could be as long as an hour or longer. Though they're likely only spending seven to 10 hours awake within a 24-hour period, and they're still too little to stay awake for that many hours in a row (and will be for a very long time)!

During your infant's wake window, you can play with baby toys, sing to them, cuddle, work on tummy time, let them enjoy a baby mat while lying flat on their back, or have some swing time while you putz around the house. Whatever you want to do with your little one is up to you!

Sleep tips for infants

Developing a solid sleep schedule and daily routine is important for your baby and your entire family. By now, your baby likely already has one—they're creatures of habit that way. Remember, flexibility is key for both you and your baby.

Remember, try not to keep your baby awake if they don't want to be. An overly tired infant can have trouble settling down and falling asleep at all, even if they're exhausted. Keeping them awake longer does not mean they'll sleep longer (and this remains true for the duration of childhood).

For more help on sleep schedules and tips for 13-month-old babies click here.

14 week old baby sleep

At 14 weeks old, your baby is inching toward leaving the newborn stage behind (but don't worry–you can totally keep saying you "just" had a baby all the way until they turn 21—it's a mom rule.)

As your little one continues to grow and develop, one of the most eagerly-anticipated milestones parents can look forward to is more sleep. Babies can be all over the map with their sleep patterns in the newborn weeks, but by 14 weeks old, some patterns may be beginning to emerge. Your baby is getting older, they are eating on a more predictable schedule and they may even be learning how to self-soothe in some instances—and all that translates into hopefully more sleep for all of you.

How much sleep does a 14-week-old baby need?

Although your little one is growing older, your baby still requires a lot of sleep: a newborn should get 14-17 hours of sleep per 24 hours, according to the National Sleep Foundation.

"By 14 weeks, your baby is nearing what most parents refer to as the 'four-month sleep regression,'" says Rachel Mitchell, a certified pediatric and maternity sleep consultant. "This can feel scary if you are anticipating your baby's sleep to become worse, but remember what is actually happening is that your baby is progressing. While this progression can affect sleep, it doesn't affect all babies in the same way. For some it is a very subtle shift and for others, it is more noticeable. Some babies also start this progression a bit early, so if you notice that your baby starts to wake up more frequently at night, or suddenly take short naps, it is possible they are moving through this progression. The best thing you can do for your baby is to stay consistent and keep addressing the foundations of sleep. Try not to panic or change too many things at once, as this can cause your baby to take longer to move through this progression and potentially create additional habits along the way."

Fourteen-week-old baby sleep schedule

By 14 weeks old, your baby may have started to put herself on her own sleep schedule—many babies start to develop natural circadian rhythms sometime around three months old. However, not all babies are the same and some may need a little extra encouragement to find the perfect sleep schedule that leaves you all feeling a little more rested.

The right sleep schedule can actually encourage your baby to sleep more, and get better quality sleep. Every baby is different and it's important to follow your baby's sleep cues whenever possible, but to help guide you along the way, here's what a sample sleep schedule for a 14-week-old baby might look like. (Keep in mind that this is just a sample and your own schedule might look a little different.)

Wake windows for a 14-week-old

By 14 weeks old, your baby's wake window will start to gradually increase to around two to four hours between naps. However, it is important to keep in mind that even if your baby can stay awake for longer periods of time, it doesn't always mean they should.

At this age, babies still can't always regulate their own sleep patterns and may simply stay awake instead of falling asleep when they're tired. That's why understanding your baby's sleep cues and sticking to a pretty regular sleep schedule (although sometimes, life happens, we know!) can be helpful.

Sleep tips for 14 week old babies

Fourteen weeks can be a somewhat difficult stage as far as sleep goes, because some babies will still be hanging around the newborn sleep phase where anything goes, while others will be tiptoeing into more "normal" sleep and wake patterns.

The most important thing to remember at this age is that every baby develops differently, so don't get discouraged if your friend's three-month-old is snoozing soundly through the night while yours is still waking up every hour to eat. Try to learn your baby's cues to recognize when they are getting sleepy before they get overtired, stay consistent with sleep routines and focus on getting rest when you can if your baby is still not quite there yet. (But they'll get there–we promise!)

15 week old baby sleep

As the early weeks go by, your newborn's sleep schedule can sometimes be tricky to figure out: how much sleep does your baby actually need anyway? And are they getting enough sleep? If you're wondering about how much sleep your 15-week-old baby should be getting each day, you've come to the right place. Because sleep is so vitally important for both you and your baby, we've created a helpful week-by-week guide to assist you in navigating the early months of your baby's sleep journey. You've got this, mama.

How much sleep does a 15-week-old baby need?

Your new baby needs lots of sleep: according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, a newborn should get 12-16 hours of sleep per 24 hours. And according to the Baby Sleep Site, at just shy of four months old, your baby will fit well within that timeframe, as they should be getting 11-12 hours of sleep at night and 3-4 hours during the day.

"At 15 weeks your baby is nearly 4 months, which is a huge milestone for your baby. Your baby's melatonin is starting to ramp up, their circadian rhythm is kicking in, and they are starting to develop more predictable patterns. In this stage, I recommend parents try to follow a 12-hour cycle, so 6-6, 7-7, or 8-8. For example, if your baby is waking for the day at 7 am, their ideal bedtime would be 7 pm," says Rachel Mitchell, founder of My Sweet Sleeper.

During weeks 14-16, the Baby Sleep Site suggests beginning to develop a consistent sleep routine, reviewing your baby's schedule, consider gentle sleep coaching/training (if necessary), create a sleep plan for your family, gather support from your village (so important!) and prepare for sleep regression, which can occur around four months of age.

I know this sounds like a lot (after all, babies need to eat, poop and play, too!), so we've put together a sample sleep schedule of what one 24-hour period with a 15-week-old baby would look like. (Note: this is meant to be a rough guide of what you can expect your baby to do; however, this is not meant to be a sleep schedule to attempt to put your baby on.)

OPTION 1: Early bedtime routine, starting at 6:15 pm, with baby asleep by 6:45 pm.

OPTION 2: Offer a nap at 6:15 pm. Wake up baby at 7 pm, with an 8:45 pm final bedtime.

"While awake windows still take priority over a sleep schedule, you can aim for this as your goal each day, just don't worry if it doesn't end up following this pattern perfectly. Continue to work on moving up bedtime and gradually introducing more independent soothing skills," says Mitchell.

Wake windows for a 15 week old baby

A wake window is the period of time a baby can stay awake in between naps without becoming overtired (because newborn babies are unable to self-regulate their own sleep patterns, they can become overtired instead of simply just falling asleep).

The average wake window for a 15-week-old newborn is about 2 hours, according to Amy Motroni, a baby and toddler sleep consultant. While baby is awake, it's time to for eating, playing and getting a diaper change. As your baby approaches 4 months old, they will likely be staying awake more during the day, while some naps may be getting shorter.

For more baby sleep tips, guides and help, click here.

16 week old baby sleep

Somebody get a cake, because it's your baby's sweet sixteen! No, they aren't asking for your keys to hit the road (yet), but your baby is turning sixteen weeks old, which, in the infant world, is kind of a big deal.

Sixteen weeks is when your baby officially moves from "newborn" to "infant," which means that the unpredictable newborn sleep schedule of mixed-up nights and days should be coming to an end. Of course, all babies are different and parenting always comes with some sort of sleep deprivation (flash forward once again to those teen driving years, yikes!), but there is hope on the horizon when it comes to catching some zzzzz's again.

The four-month mark brings a lot of exciting developments and changes, especially in the sleep department. Read on for what a sleep schedule with your new 4-month-old might look like, along with some sleep tips to get you there.

How much sleep does a 16-week-old baby need?

At 16 weeks old, your baby still requires lots of sleep, but not as much as a newborn: a baby this age should get 12-15 hours of sleep per 24 hours, according to the National Sleep Foundation.

"Yay, your baby is now 4 months old! At this point their sleep needs are slightly less, with the recommendation between 3.5-5 hours of day sleep and between 10-12 hours of night sleep," says Rachel Mitchell, a certified pediatric and maternity sleep consultant. "At four months, your baby's sleep starts to change quite a bit. Melatonin really starts to produce, their circadian rhythm is driving sleep patterns, and their bedtime should be on the earlier side (ideally between 7-830 pm.). This is a lot for your baby to go through at once, so consistency in this stage is key."

Mitchell says naps should also follow a pattern: "Your baby is hopefully following a consistent pattern of 3-4 naps per day, with two of those naps at least 1-2 hours. If your baby is napping more than 2.5 hours in this stage, you want to wake them up. If the last nap of the day starts to blend with bedtime, then wake your baby up sooner to give them adequate awake time before bed (at least 2 hours)."

16 week old baby sleep schedule

With baby graduating past the newborn stage, that's not to say that every baby will magically start sleeping through the night at 16 weeks old or that all babies will follow the same pace of development. That just means that, ready or not, your baby is already starting to grow up and that means adjusting to some new sleep patterns along the way. Here's what a sample sleep schedule for a sixteen-week-old might look like.

Sleep tips for 16 week old babies

Although your baby may be on a more regular sleep schedule–or at least moving in that direction–by sixteen weeks, there will still be plenty of things that could interfere with her sleep in the coming months.

From teething to minor illnesses to growth spurts, you can expect that your baby's sleep will be interrupted from time to time, and that's okay. As long as you stick to a pretty regular sleep schedule and work to establish sleep cues and self-soothing techniques as appropriate for your baby's development, you can hopefully create positive sleep habits that will benefit both you and your baby.

For more baby sleep tips, guides and help, click here.

4 month old baby sleep

Four months is a sweet time in your baby's life—it's one of my favorite ages as a mom, when your baby is just discovering the world around them and is full of smiles, snuggles and cute baby coos.

As adorable as this age is, however, it also comes with a not-so-sweet milestone: the four-month sleep regression (shudder). If your once-sound sleeper is suddenly having trouble at night or naptime, don't worry: a sleep regression is normal at this age and there are things you can do to get you both back to the rest you need. Or at least Netflix at night while the baby sleeps because we don't judge here.

How much sleep does a four-month-old baby need?

Your baby needs lots of sleep: according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, a baby this age should get 12-16 hours of sleep per 24 hours.

At four months old, your baby has hit a pretty big milestone: they are officially no longer classified as a newborn! Instead, they move into the "infant" category of sleep. That's a bittersweet one, right?

Newborn sleep, according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) can't really be classified because it's so scattered. But once your baby is four months old, some more clear patterns for sleep and wake times do start to emerge. The AASM notes that, on average, infants aged 4-12 months need 12-16 hours of sleep per day, including naps.

Related: Baby Feeding Guides & Schedules

"At four months old, your baby is officially no longer a newborn, and their sleep starts to change quite a bit," Rachel Mitchell, a certified pediatric and maternal sleep consultant and founder of My Sweet Sleeper, explains. She adds that at four months old, your baby will need less sleep than they did in the newborn stage, requiring 3.5 to 5 hours of day sleep and between 10 to 12 hours of night sleep.

According to Mitchell, one of the big changes that happens this month is the production of the sleep hormone melatonin. And while that big shift can come with some big changes, sleep-wise, Mitchell urges parents not to panic.

"This is often the stage that parents start to dread the anticipated 'four month sleep regression,' but what is actually happening is that your baby is making big leaps developmentally and this is more of a progression," she says. "While progressions will likely affect your child's sleep habits, there is no need to panic. This is a lot for your baby to go through at once, so consistency in this stage is key."

And just how do you get–and keep–that consistency? Starting a baby sleep schedule can help you both learn to adjust and follow sleep cues that will establish healthy sleep habits. Here's a sample sleep schedule that Mitchell recommends.

Four-month-old baby sleep schedule

You'll notice in this sleep schedule that bedtimes are fairly early–that's because at four months old, your baby is just establishing melatonin and a circadian rhythm.

"The circadian rhythm more efficiently drives sleep patterns, so bedtime should be on the earlier side, ideally between 7 p.m. and 8:30 p.m.," Mitchell explains.

4 month old baby sleep schedule

She also adds that naps should follow a consistent pattern of 3 to 4 naps per day, with 2 of those naps lasting at least 1 to 2 hours. "If your baby is napping more than 2.5 hours in this stage, you'll want to wake them up," she says. "If the last nap of the day starts to blend with bedtime, then wake your baby up sooner to give them adequate awake time before bed—at least 2 hours before they go down for the night."

Related: 4-month-old baby milestones

Wake windows for a 4 month old

Wake windows for a four-month-old baby are ideally only between 90 and 120 minutes, says Mitchell, and the first awake window of the day should always be the shortest. To help make the most of those wake times—and ensure your little one is properly pooped out for the next nap—it's important to pack in as much playtime as possible while they're awake. "Do your best to ensure your baby gets enough activity, especially tummy time, during awake windows," Mitchell suggests.

Sleep tips for 4 month old babies

While you might notice some sleep regressions at this age, it's important to keep in mind that there is a reason for any sleep disruptions your baby is going through. In fact, it's a sign that they are developing and growing appropriately, so in a way, sleep regressions are a good thing. Even if it doesn't feel that way at 2 a.m., we get it.

With that in mind, sleep is still a precious thing and it can be difficult when you're not getting enough of it, so here are some tips to help you both get the sleep you need:

  • Stay consistent, but be flexible. The key to getting through a sleep regression is to stay consistent with your baby's sleep schedule and to be aware of their own sleep cues so you can adjust the schedule as needed. For instance, if your baby needs to sleep a little earlier than the schedule recommends, that's okay! Every baby is different, and sometimes, babies who are growing or fighting off a cold may need more sleep.
  • Consider eliminating one night feeding. According to Mitchell, four months is also the time that you can start to consider helping your baby to learn to sleep longer stretches at night by eliminating a night feeding. "You may start to think about dropping to one night feed if it seems like your baby is ready," she says. (Just be sure to clear this with a doctor first, especially if there is any concern about your baby's weight gain.)
  • Try sleep training. Another strategy that may help? Sleep training. "This is also the time you can start to think about sleep training, as long as your baby's foundations of sleep are in place," Mitchell suggests.
  • Ditch the swaddle if your baby is rolling. The other important aspect to consider with sleep at four months is safety. Four-month-old babies may be starting to become more mobile, which means you'll have to make some adjustments for safe sleep. "If you notice your baby is starting to roll over onto their tummy, make sure to stop swaddling at naps and bedtime immediately," Mitchell says. "You can move to a sleep sack, but once your baby can roll, it is no longer safe to swaddle."

Four months brings a lot of change for both you and your baby, especially in the sleep department, so if you are struggling, be sure to reach out for help if you need it. Sleep is a skill and all of us need help learning new skills, right? "If you are feeling overwhelmed by all the changes your baby is experiencing in this stage, or you are not sure where to start, feel free to reach out to chat with a sleep consultant about your options," Mitchell says.

For more baby sleep tips, guides and help, click here

5 month old baby sleep

By five months old, your baby has hopefully passed through the dreaded four-month sleep regression and is well on her way to better nights of sleep. Although every baby is different, of course, babies at this age can start to show more regular sleep patterns. And things like being more active during the day, being curious about new things around him and starting to reach more physical milestones, like rolling over, can certainly help tucker out your little explorer.

However, your five-month-old baby's sleep may not be exactly what you're hoping for just yet. Your baby is still growing (and learning) all about the world around them, including how to sleep.

Here are some things you can expect from your five month old in the sleep department, along with some tips for an ideal sleep schedule to keep you both well-rested.

How much sleep does a five-month-old baby need?

As the American Academy of Sleep Medicine explains, a 5-month-old baby should get between 12-16 hours of sleep per 24 hours. This is generally broken up into nighttime sleep and between 2-4 naps during the day. Rachel Mitchell, a certified pediatric and maternal sleep consultant and founder of My Sweet Sleeper, tells Motherly that you may notice that as your baby reaches five months of age, their daytime and nighttime sleep habits are becoming more consistent.

She notes that most babies have moved through the four-month sleep progression (thank goodness!) and are transitioning from four naps down to three around this stage. "Your baby will still likely be on three to four naps per day, but you may find that the fourth nap is no longer needed if your baby is taking three naps that are one hour or longer," Mitchell explains.

Related: Baby Feeding Guides & Schedules

Sleep at night will be more consistent, but she also adds that it's still very normal for a five-month-old baby to wake up once a night to eat, so if that happens, you should feed your baby and lay them back down. If you're dealing with a lot of nighttime wake-ups, there may be something else going on. "If your baby is waking more frequently than once a night and won't go back down without a feed, it's possible that they need more calories during the day," Mitchell adds. Optimizing sleep at night often starts with the right daytime sleep routine too, so here are Mitchell's suggestions for a sleep schedule for success.

Five-month-old baby sleep schedule

Interestingly enough, the most important part of a sleep schedule for a five-month-old baby is actually when you time putting your baby to bed, says Mitchell. Waiting too long can throw off the whole schedule, but putting your baby to bed too early may also not be ideal. It can be difficult at this age, because babies are still growing and developing and may tucker themselves right out earlier some days. So you can pay attention to your baby's cues and offer them an earlier bedtime on the days they do seem to need it.

"The ideal bedtime in this stage is between 7 pm and 8 p.m., but you may find that some days your baby needs to go to bed between 6 p.m. and 7 p.m.," Mitchell explains. "It is generally better in this stage to offer an early bedtime than it is to offer a late cat nap and push bedtime later."

Wake windows for a five month old

Wake windows are also key at this stage—wake windows are the length of time that your baby is awake between naps. During awake windows, you can play with your baby, let them have tummy time, or eat.

And while awake windows can be packed with activity, it's also important to time them appropriately to help your baby sleep better. Mitchell explains that wake windows start to increase at this age, now that your baby is a little bit older, and they should decrease in length from the start of the day to the end of the day.

Related: 5-month-old baby milestones

For example, the first wake window of the day should be the shortest, while the last of the day should be the longest to promote a deeper sleep at night.

"At this stage, awake windows will start to lengthen to about 1.75 to 2.5 hours, with the first awake window being the shortest and the last awake window before bed being the longest (assuming the last nap is adequate)," she says.

Sleep tips for 5-month-old babies

Along with timing that awake time and bedtime to just the right moments so you can both get the optimum amount of sleep, here are a few more sleep tips for your five month old.

  • Assess the swaddle. If your baby is rolling from front-to-back or back-to-front now, it's time to ditch the swaddle. You can switch to a sleep sack for babies who are able to roll, but just be sure their arms are free so they don't get trapped if they roll over in their crib. Some babies may need more time than others adjusting to all of that freedom, but don't worry--we promise they'll get the hang of it eventually!
  • Introduce those sleep cues. Five months old is a great time to introduce some more visual sleep cues if you haven't already. Your baby might enjoy looking at pictures in a book with you, or hearing your voice read the same story at nighttime. Establishing clear sleep cues at nap and bedtime can help get you both in a routine for better sleep.
  • Nap times are key. It might sound confusing, but an adequate amount of nap time during the day is crucial to your baby's overall sleep success. Mitchell explains that your baby needs between 3.5-4.5 hours of sleep per day. If they aren't getting that, it will interfere with their sleep at night too. "If your baby is getting less than 3.5 hours, you will likely find that night sleep may be disrupted as well," she says.
  • Go with the flow. We know there's a lot of talk about schedules and times and not missing those sleep windows. But it's also important to remember that all babies are different and also, life happens! If your sleep schedule gets completely disrupted one day, it doesn't mean all hope is lost. Just try to stick to consistent routines the majority of the time, and those good habits will eventually pay off.

For more baby sleep tips, guides and help, click here

6 month old baby sleep

It's probably hard to believe you have a six-month-old, but somehow, here you are. Gone are the newborn days and in are the sitting-up, ready-for-solids, how-did-you-get-so-big days.

Your baby will grow and change a lot this month, and so will their sleep. Thanks to all of the exciting new changes your baby will undergo this month, their sleep might change too—but in a totally good way. Your baby will be settling into more regular sleep patterns and is capable of both sleeping longer stretches at a time and self-soothing for those times they do wake up at night with you. It's a whole new (six-month-old!) world, parents!

How much sleep does a six-month-old baby need?

According to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, babies under one year should get 12-16 hours of sleep per 24 hours. The Journal of Nature and Science of Sleep also adds that most commonly, sleep for a six-month-old baby averages more in the 13-14 hour per day range. However, all babies are different and some six-month-olds may still need those extra few hours of sleep!Rachel Mitchell, a certified pediatric and maternal sleep consultant and founder of My Sweet Sleeper, also confirms that babies at six months will start decreasing the amount of sleep they need.

"There's a lot going on with your baby at six months of age," Mitchell says. "This is typically the stage that your little one will officially drop to three naps, and their day sleep naturally starts to consolidate."

Related: Baby Feeding Guides & Schedules

She also adds that some babies may still need more sleep at this stage, and that's okay—what's important is to follow your baby's own sleep cues and support their individual development, instead of sticking to a rigid schedule. "In this stage your baby is ideally still getting between 3/3.5 to 4 hours of day sleep, or slightly more if your baby is what we call a 'high sleep needs baby," she explains. (Serious question: can a mom be considered 'high sleep needs' because if so, that's me.)

But speaking of schedules, knowing the ideal sleep schedule for your six-month-old baby can be extremely helpful. It can guide you to knowing how long your baby should be awake between naps, when to time naps and what an ideal bedtime will look like. Because babies can all be so different and are changing so much at this age, having a sleep schedule to customize can be a game-changer, so here's one that Mitchell suggests parents can look at.

Six-month-old baby sleep schedule

six-month-baby-sleep-schedule

The most important change that Mitchell says parents should be aware of is that a six-month-old baby has the capability to sleep longer stretches, which is a hugely exciting milestone. She also notes that babies can likely start to self-soothe on their own, so you can start to experiment with letting them explore some methods (safely, of course!) that they are able to practice self-soothing.

Wake windows for a six month old

At six months old, Mitchell notes that your approach to wake windows for your baby should shift a little bit.

"At this stage, you should still be following awake windows vs. a by-the-clock schedule and your baby may be ready to extend awake windows slightly to 2 to 3 hours," she explains.

Following your baby's own awake windows means that you will also time their naps during the day accordingly. Just like last month, you'll want to decrease the length of your baby's nap times during the day. For instance, you should aim to time your baby's first two naps to be between 1.5 to 2 hours and their last nap between 45 minutes to 1 hour.

"The last nap of the day at this point should really just be a bridge to bedtime, which is ideally between 7 p.m. and 8 p.m.," Mitchell adds.

Related: 6-month-old baby milestones

Sleep tips for 6 month olds

The biggest sleep tip for babies at six months old? Introducing solid foods may just help your little one sleep better.

Mitchell points out that a big growth spurt often occurs around this time, which could lead to sleep disruptions if their nutritional needs are not being met. Solids during the day can help bridge that gap as your baby grows and she also adds that a temporary nighttime wake-up call for a feeding is normal too.

"This is the age that I recommend gradually starting to introduce solids, and you may notice that your baby is hungrier than usual in this stage, which can be due to a growth spurt that often occurs around this time," she explains. "If you have already dropped the night feed, but you notice your child is suddenly waking up and needing a feed, know that it's OK to bring it back temporarily."

For more baby sleep tips, guides and help, click here

7 month old baby sleep

Your seven-month-old baby is probably having all sorts of fun these days—they may be crawling, sitting up and basically be a food connoisseur of sorts by now. But while you might think that all of the newfound discoveries and activities happening in your little one's life would mean that sleep at this age would be a no-brainer, the opposite is actually true. Thanks to all the new commotion and fun around them, your baby may actually have more trouble falling asleep. Weird, right? But babies need guidance to learn how to sleep, and that's where you come in.

Here are some tips from a sleep expert on how to ensure your seven-month-old baby doesn't lose track of the sleep progress you've made.

How much sleep does a seven-month-old baby need?

According to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, at seven months old, your baby still needs around 12-16 hours of sleep per 24 hours. Some babies naturally start to fall more into a pattern of needing only closer to 13-14 hours of sleep per day, but every baby is different and even different stages can require more sleep too.

"At seven months old, your baby is starting to become more active and interested in the world around them, which is exciting!" notes Rachel Mitchell, a certified pediatric and maternal sleep consultant and founder of My Sweet Sleeper. But all of the excitement around them can actually be a little too exciting for some babies—and cause them to get confused when it comes to sleep. "Because of this new phenomenon, you may notice that they become more easily distracted, which can sometimes interfere with sleep," Mitchell points out.

Related: Baby Feeding Guides & Schedules

Fear not, however, because Mitchell is here to guide the way to better sleep for both your seven month old and you. She stresses that the right amount of sleep per day and night is crucial to development, as well as continuing healthy sleep habits that have already been established.

"Your child should be getting about 3 to 4 hours of day sleep and 10 to 12 hours of night sleep in this stage," she explains. "If they are getting less, it's important to address any underlying issues or challenges that may be present, as the right amount of sleep is crucial for their brain development."

To help make sure your baby is getting the right amount of sleep, Mitchell recommends sticking to a sleep schedule that can be customized to your baby's own needs. Here's a sample one.

Seven-month-old baby sleep schedule

7 month old baby sleep schedule

One of the key things to note about your baby's sleep at seven months old, according to Mitchell, is that your baby should no longer need to wake up at night to eat. I know—it's a huge change, right?

You're probably so used to getting up at night this might seem hard to believe, but it's true. Instead of automatically offering a bottle or the breast at night, if your baby does wake up, Mitchell assures us that it's okay to switch things up and try new techniques for getting them back to sleep.

"At seven months, your child shouldn't need a night feed as long as they are getting adequate nutrition during the day," Mitchell explains. "So if your baby still wakes up looking for a feed, try to allow them to self-soothe or respond with other soothing techniques."

Related: 7-month-old baby milestones

Wake windows for a seven month old

By seven months old, your baby's wake windows are slowly increasing, but Mitchell cautions that you should continue to take it slow. It might be tempting to let your baby play and explore, because it's fun and exciting for both of you, but keep in mind, trying to "tire" a baby out will usually just backfire.

Instead of causing them to sleep more, keeping a baby awake can actually just disrupt their sleep even more. So, to help your baby get the best sleep possible, she recommends sticking to your sleep routine as best you can and keeping wake windows to between 2 and 3.5 hours for a seven-month-old baby. "Remember to pay close attention to your little one's sleepy cues, as not all babies can handle a 3.5 hour awake window before bed just yet," she says.

Sleep tips for 7 month old babies

What else can you do to set your seven-month-old baby up for sleep success? There are a few additional tips that Mitchell offers:

  • Try sleep training. If you haven't already incorporated sleep training into your routine yet, Mitchell says 7 months is a great time to start implementing some sleep training methods. There are several different methods and strategies you can try, so remember that you can do what works for your family and try out a few methods to find something that feels right.
  • Keep sleep spaces dark. It might not seem like it matters that much for babies, but Mitchell encourages parents to keep sleep environments dark. Your baby is undergoing a lot of commotion during the day and their brain is basically exploding with development, so switching to calm, quiet, and darkened spaces for sleeping can help cue them that it's time for rest.
  • Wake windows are key. Once again, Mitchell also stresses that awake windows are key. Just like Goldilocks's porridge, you have to aim for the right amount—too much or too little and you can miss that precious sleep window. Aim for awake times of more than 2 but less than 3.5 hours.

For more baby sleep tips, guides and help, click here

8 month old baby sleep

We have good news and bad news about your eight-month-old baby's sleep: first, the good news: Your baby is well on their way to better sleep. In fact, many babies learn to sleep through the night by six months of age.

But now, the bad news: Around eight months, many babies tend to experience what can be a pretty intense sleep regression. A sleep regression can be a difficult thing to go through with your baby, especially when you may have been celebrating them (finally!) sleeping through the night, but sleep regressions aren't actually a bad thing.

In fact, sleep regressions are a sign that your baby is developing and growing properly. That may be hard to remember at 2 a.m., but it's true!

We'll talk more about what's behind your eight-month-old's sleep regression, and how to navigate those sleep disruptions.

How much sleep does an 8-month-old baby need?

The American Academy of Sleep Medicine notes that at 8 months old, your baby should be getting between 12-16 hours of sleep per 24 hours. Many babies around this age will be hovering closer to the 13-14 hour per day territory, and that's okay. Every baby is different and by now, you'll probably know if your baby is the type who requires more or less sleep.

The big news with an eight-month-old baby is that most likely, your baby will be going through a major sleep regression. In fact, Rachel Mitchell, a certified pediatric and maternal sleep consultant and founder of My Sweet Sleeper, explains that the eight-month-old sleep regression is considered a "true" sleep regression because it coincides with a progression and developmental leap.

Related: Baby Feeding Guides & Schedules

"You can thank teething for this, along with crawling and increased mobility, such as sitting up and rolling a lot," she notes.

Sleep regressions tend to occur alongside major developmental leaps—such as sitting up and crawling—in your baby, so while they do represent the positive fact that your baby is developing appropriately, those sudden wake-ups or unwillingness to go back to sleep may not feel so positive.

The best thing you can do to make it through a sleep regression with your baby, says Mitchell, is to maintain the sleep cues and routines that you have already set up—and to avoid making any sudden shifts to your schedule. "Try to stay as consistent as possible and don't make any major changes during this time," she suggests.

One way you can stay consistent is to stick to your baby's sleep and wake schedule. Mitchell recommends the following schedule to help guide you through the eight-month-old sleep regression.

8-month-old baby sleep schedule

Another important aspect to keep in mind about your eight-month-old baby's sleep is that while consistency and sticking to a routine is important, so is taking the time to realize that your baby is going to need different things from you at different stages.

And right now, at eight months old, your baby is going through enormous changes and may be quite physically uncomfortable from growth and teething. So it's okay (and necessary) to take extra care with your little one this month, even if that means some missed sleep for both of you.

"Though sleep regressions can be hard to navigate, you might need to be a bit more gentle in your approach and respond to wake-ups or any crying a bit sooner than normal," Mitchell says.

Related: 8-month-old baby milestones

Wake windows for an eight month old

According to Mitchell, an eight-month-old baby will be sleeping 10-12 hours at night and around 3-4 hours during the day. (Keep in mind that's not always consecutive, of course.)

Wake windows for an eight-month-old baby can be tricky, Mitchell explains. She notes that many babies' wake windows will get longer at this age—usually between 2.5 to 3.5 hours—but others will have shorter wake windows when they are going through a progression and accompanying regression.

Mitchell also says that many babies at this age might start moving towards adopting a two-a-day nap schedule instead of three or four shorter naps. However, you might want to hold off before you officially transition them.

"I typically recommend holding off until around 9 or 10 months of age, once it is clear that your baby is truly ready," she says. "There is no need to rush this transition if your baby is doing well with naps and night sleep."

Sleep tips for 8 month old babies

Sleep at this stage might feel like something you have to elbow your way through, and if we're being honest with you: that's okay. Not every part of parenting is Instagram-worthy, and going through a sleep regression can be, well, terrible. Hey, we're honest about motherhood here. But we also promise that it will get better. Focus on taking care of yourself this month, maybe treat yourself to a fancy drink at Starbucks and stick to the safe sleep habits and bedtime routines you've already established. That will help both of you make it through this stage and focus on sleep strategies that will work.

Additionally, here are some other tips to keep in mind:

  • Tame teething. Since teething tends to be one of the primary culprits behind the eight-month sleep regression, Mitchell recommends trying some strategies to tame the teething monster. "If you notice that your baby is having a hard time with teething and losing sleep, consider using safe teething devices like a cold chewing object," she suggests.
  • Keep it safe. While teething can be a beast and might make you feel like desperate times call for desperate measures, be sure to know how to keep your baby safe with teething remedies too, Mitchell cautions. For instance, she does not recommend teething necklaces or numbing gels for safety reasons.
  • Talk to a pediatrician. You don't have to tackle teething alone! If you are really struggling with sleep at this age, or feel like your child is having a lot of pain from teething, or just don't know what to do, reach out for help. "Speak with your child's pediatrician about other pain management tools and techniques," Mitchell advises.

For more baby sleep tips, guides and help, click here

9 month old baby sleep

By nine months old, hopefully you and your baby have made it through the dreaded true sleep regression that went down at eight months. (Shudder.) If you're still navigating the transition, our thoughts and strongest coffees are with you. Stay strong, consistent in your routines and provide extra snuggles to your baby when they need it, because they're going through a lot of changes.

But if you've made it to the other side of sleep at nine months old, here's what to expect.

How much sleep does a nine-month-old baby need?

Although you've officially reached the nine months in/nine months out milestone, meaning that the newborn days are long behind you, your baby still needs a lot of sleep. According to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, babies under one should get 12-16 hours of sleep per 24 hours. Many babies around this age tend to get closer to 13-14 hours of sleep, but all babies are different, so you may have a baby who is on the higher range for sleep, or one who requires less sleep. (Lucky you, right?)

The big sleep milestone at nine months old is that your baby might be officially ready to switch to a two-a-day nap schedule, instead of three or even four smaller naps.

Related: Baby Feeding Guides & Schedules

"Your baby might be ready for two naps if they are showing strong and consistent signs that they are ready for this transition," explains Rachel Mitchell, a certified pediatric and maternal sleep consultant and founder of My Sweet Sleeper.

Some of these signs include:

  • Rejecting the third nap outright for 10-14 consecutive days
  • Fulfilling their sleep needs in their first two naps, causing the last nap to be too late,
  • Sudden night wakings or early risings

If you notice these signs in your baby, you can start transitioning them to a more structured two-a-day nap schedule, which consists of a morning nap and an afternoon nap. This may take some time for your baby to fully adjust and as your baby nears this transition, bedtime will also need to change.

"Bedtime will likely shift a bit earlier, ideally between 7 to 8 p.m. at the latest," says Mitchell

That's a lot to take in, but don't worry—Mitchell also has a sample sleep schedule to help guide you through making that transition, including when to time nap times and bedtime.

9-month-old baby sleep schedule

9-month-old-sleep-schedule

Wake windows for a nine month old

The total sleep needs and wake windows of a nine-month-old baby is about the same as an eight-month-old, explains Mitchell. That boils down to about 10-12 hours a night and 3-4 hours per day (not usually consecutive, of course.)

Wake windows—the period of time your baby should be awake between naps and before bedtime—can still be pretty variable at this age too. Mitchell notes that some babies will only be able to tolerate shorter wake times, such as 2.5 hours, while others may be able to go for longer periods of time, up to 3.5 hours.

Try to pay attention to your baby's own sleep cues and signs that they are tired in order to figure out what your baby's optimal wake window is. And be sure to aim to have the longest wake window of the day (ideally, no more than 3.5 hours), be right before bedtime.

Related: 9-month-old baby milestones

Sleep tips for 9 month old babies

If you dealt with sleep regressions last month, this month should be all about catching up on lost sleep for you and continuing those sleep habits and routines that you set into place. (We told you it would pay off!)

By this month, your baby should be able to go back to sleep at night without eating, so keep that in mind if there are any wake-ups. Most babies by this age are capable of sleeping through the night, so here are some additional tips for sleep with a nine-month-old:

  • Mix it up during the day. Making sure your baby is stimulated adequately during the day with appropriate amounts of activity. And if you find yourself both in a rut, consider mixing up your daytime routines. For instance, you could try taking a walk outside together or taking a baby music class together.
  • Assess your sleep environment. Your baby will respond to cues in their sleep environment, so if you're still struggling with sleep, take a look around. Is the place you're trying to put your baby to sleep a calming environment? Are there bright lights around? Is it noisy? If there are any changes that you could make to make the sleep environment more calming, take them and see if it makes a difference.
  • Don't force it. Although many babies will be past the eight-month-old sleep regression and moving into a two-a-day nap schedule, some babies won't be there just yet. So don't force it! Follow your baby's cues and let them lead the way for you when it comes to sleep.
  • Try sleep training. Once your baby is past the sleep regression of eight months, you can implement more sleep training techniques. Just be sure you don't try to implement any major changes during a regression, says Mitchell.

For more baby sleep tips, guides and help, click here

10 month old baby sleep

Your baby is inching toward that first birthday milestone, which might feel both impossible and also wildly exciting. But if you're a parent who is still struggling with getting your baby to sleep, every second of those 10 months is probably weighing heavily on you.

First things first, let me just say: you're not alone. As the mother of a baby who refused to sleep more than 10 minutes at a time as a baby, the struggle is real. Some babies need more guidance in the sleep department than others.

But at 10 months, there are a few strategies you can take to support healthy sleep habits.

How much sleep does a 10-month-old baby need?

Any baby under the age of 12 months requires anywhere between 12-16 hours of sleep per day, according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

Rachel Mitchell, a certified pediatric and maternal sleep consultant and founder of My Sweet Sleeper, explains that the biggest shift that happens around 10 months is that your baby is likely taking two consistent naps.

"This means you are able to follow a more predictable daily schedule with them, although you are still tracking awake windows and adjusting as needed," she notes.

Related: Baby Feeding Guides & Schedules

An ideal two-nap schedule will look something like this: 7 a.m. wakeup, nap #1 around 9:30 a.m. - 11/11:30 a.m., a second nap 2/2:30 to 3:30/4 p.m., then finally, a 7/7:30 p.m. bedtime.

"Once your baby makes this transition they should still be getting a minimum of 3 to 3.5 hours of day sleep, and for many babies closer to 4 hours," Mitchel adds.

Here's a more detailed look at what a 10-month-old baby schedule can be.

10-month-old baby sleep schedule

Wake windows for a 10 month old

Wake windows for a 10-month-old vary from 2.5-3.5 hours. That means that the maximum amount of time your baby should be awake before taking a nap or going to bed for the night should never be more than 3.5 hours. Ideally, the wake times during the earlier parts of the day will be shorter, while the last wake window of the day—that occurs right before bedtime—will be the longest, at 3.5 hours. This helps promote a regular sleep pattern and sets your baby up for success to sleep a longer stretch at night.

As Michell reminds us, it's also very important to pay attention to your baby's own sleep cues to uncover what the ideal wake windows are for you. Some babies will need shorter wake windows, while others may need longer wake windows. You should never force your baby to stay awake or go to sleep just to stick to a schedule—instead, try to learn their own sleep cues and adjust your sleep schedule to fit your baby's needs.

Related: 10-month-old baby milestones

Sleep tips for 10 month old babies

Sleep with a 10-month-old can be full of twists and turns. It might seem like just as you're getting used to one stage of sleep, it's time to switch things up.

As you've probably figured out by now, a lot of navigating baby sleep is about balancing going with the flow with set patterns and routines that support your little one's sleep habits. This month, you'll probably need to be somewhat flexible as your baby establishes a firm two-nap sleep habit and starts to become more active as well. Here are some other sleep tips to keep in mind:

  • Do nothing. Sounds strange, right? But this one is important, because Mitchell explains that around 10 months old, your baby enters the stage of more exploration. For instance, you may find that your baby is starting to pull up on things and stand in their crib. And if you're worried about how all that exploration will affect their sleep, Mitchell advises you to just let it go. "If you notice your baby is doing this and it is interfering with sleep, try to give your baby the space to practice this skill on their own without intervening too frequently," she suggests.
  • Try sleep training. 10 month can be a great time to try sleep training if you haven't already—your baby should be well past the sleep regression stage and if they've already been settled in the two-nap schedule for a while, it might be a sign they're ready for some additional sleep training at night. And remember: there are many different methods of sleep training, so you don't have to do anything that doesn't feel right for your family.
  • Don't let your baby nap on the go. This one can be a challenge, but whenever possible, try to avoid having your baby sleep in places outside of their crib at home. Naps in the car or on-the-go are probably not going to be giving your baby the benefit and rest of a full sleep cycle like they'd have at home, and may actually disrupt their routine.

For more baby sleep tips, guides and help, click here

11 month old baby sleep

Not yet a toddler, not yet a baby—at 11 months old, your baby is teetering right on the edge of toddlerhood, yet you're probably holding on to that sweet babyhood with all that you have. We don't blame you there, mama, and the good news is that your baby will always be your baby.

But if your baby is giving you a run for your money in the sleep department, we've got some tips and tricks to help your soon-to-be one-year-old snooze a little better.

How much sleep does an 11-month-old baby need?

According to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, babies under the age of 12 month need 12-16 hours of sleep per 24 hours. After one, that sleep requirement drops down to 11-14 hours of sleep, so there can definitely be some variance at this age. In general, you can count on your baby needing at least somewhere between 12-13 hours of sleep.

The reason that there can be a lot of differences in how much sleep babies will need at this stage is because of the enormous amount of changes babies are going through at 11 months old.

Related: Baby Feeding Guides & Schedules

"At this stage, your baby is going through a lot developmentally and is likely starting to show signs of trying to walk, increased verbal communication, and increased interest in foods," explains Rachel Mitchell, a certified pediatric and maternal sleep consultant and founder of My Sweet Sleeper. "All of these things can start to affect sleep, although not always in a negative way."

You and your baby may have settled into a good sleep routine by now, but if you need a refresher—or reassurance that you're on the right track, Mitchell provides an example of what an 11-month-old baby sleep schedule should look like:

11-month-old baby sleep schedule

One of the most important things that parents should be aware of when it comes to an 11-month-old baby and sleep, says Mitchell, is that sleep disturbances could actually be a sign that your baby is overtired.

"If you notice your baby is taking short naps or waking frequently at night, this can actually be a sign that they are overtired or struggling to self-soothe," she explains. "If this is happening, I recommend you go back to the foundations of sleep and ensure that you are meeting your baby where they are developmentally."

Wake windows for an 11 month old

According to Mitchell, your baby's sleep needs are similar to 10 months with awake windows ranging from 2.5 to 4 hours. And as you might notice, there's a pretty big difference between 2.5 hours and 4 hours, which means it's important for you to try to learn your baby's sleep cues so you can time their wake windows appropriately.

"It is continually important to pay attention to your baby's sleepy cues and make sure that you're following awake windows that work well for your baby," she suggests.

Related: 11-month-old baby milestones

Sleepy cues can include:

  • Rubbing their eyes
  • No longer wanting to "play"
  • Appearing to stare off into space
  • Red around the eyes
  • Looking tired
  • Not really showing interest in activities
  • Increased irritability and fussiness

Sleep tips for 11 month old babies

As Mitchell pointed out, it might be tempting to add in a lot of new activities to your baby's schedule as they get older, but it's still really important to realize that even an 11-month-old can't tolerate being awake for extended periods of time.

Try your best to stick to a schedule that allows for regular nap times in your baby's own crib (stroller naps and car seat naps aren't giving them the high-quality sleep they need) and focus on sleep routines that are predictable. Even if doing the same things, like reading the same book every day at nap time, seems boring, it's teaching your baby's brain that it's time to sleep—and that's a beautiful thing.

For more baby sleep tips, guides and help, click here

1 year old sleep

Your baby is now 12 months old—an official, full-fledged toddler! There is a lot that happens at this age, and we're not just talking about the cake. (Although really, is there ever a bad time to talk about cake?)

Turning 12 months old means a lot of change for your baby, and that can definitely affect their sleep. You might even notice some sleep disturbances at this age, but fear not—Rachel Mitchell, a certified pediatric and maternal sleep consultant and founder of My Sweet Sleeper, explains that there is no reason to panic. Your baby is just going through some major developmental milestones and sleep help is on the horizon.

Here's more about what you can expect from your newly-minted one-year-old and sleep.

How much sleep does a 12-month-old baby need?

According to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, your baby's sleep needs shift from 12-16 hours of sleep to 11-14 hours of sleep around the age of 12 months.

Of course, there is no magical sleep fairy that waves a wand over your baby and makes that change happen, so the shift could happen a little before 12 months old, or a little after. The most important thing to keep in mind is that your baby's sleep will most likely be shifting a bit as they grow and adjust into toddlerhood.

"The 12-month mark is such an exciting milestone for both of you," notes Mitchell. "A major progression can happen at this stage, which is related to specific leaps as well as generally increased independence and physical growth."

Related: Baby Feeding Guides & Schedules

She explains that because your baby is making some major developmental strides this month, such as walking and talking, their sleep habits may start to shift with all the increased activity.

"While not all babies are negatively affected by this progression, I do often see that babies may suddenly start waking up at night or start to take short naps—but if this is happening, try not to panic," Mitchell adds. "It typically lasts only a week or so and as long as you remain consistent in your approach, then you should see that your baby moves through this just fine."

Phew. A week only of distributed sleep is definitely good news. But because staying consistent is key to getting a toddler back on track, here's what Mitchell recommends for a sleep schedule for a 12-month-old.

12-month-old baby sleep schedule

As you probably noticed, by 12 months old, your baby should be pretty well set in a two-a-day nap schedule. If they're not there yet, Mitchell recommends that you transition your baby there—and keep them there.

"I recommend remaining on a two-nap schedule as long as possible, and at minimum until 14 months (ideally closer to 18 months)," she says.

Wake windows for a 12 month old

Your baby is getting older, which means they can stay awake a lot longer during the day than they used to. Mitchell explains that by 12 months old, your baby's wake window can stretch as long as 4 hours. Just think of all the things you can do together in that 4-hour window!

Of course, not all babies will be ready to party hard for 4 straight hours and some babies may still be stuck in the 2.5 hour wake window. The important thing to remember is that all babies are different, and you should follow what suits your baby the best. At minimum, however, Mitchell stresses that your baby needs 3 hours of day sleep and 10 to 12 hours of sleep at night.

Related: 12-month-old baby milestones

Sleep tips for 1 year old babies

You've been through a lot this first year together, but Mitchell notes that if getting consistent sleep is something that you and your baby are both still struggling with, there is no shame in asking for help. By 12 months old, most babies should be pretty established in a regular sleep routine that includes two daily naps and a solid stretch at night--and that's a stage that they will stay in for several months. If your baby isn't there, it might be time to talk to your pediatrician and consult a sleep coach who can help assess your baby's needs and suggest some strategies that can help.

Because while 12 months may mark the end of the infant stage, that doesn't mean your baby will automatically be ready to leave sleep troubles behind.

"If you notice your baby is struggling to move through this progression, I would suggest you reach out for additional one-on-one assistance," Mitchel says.

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This post was originally published in 2015. It has been updated.